Match!

Mindfulness as a predictor of cognitive-behavioral therapy outcomes in inner-city adults with posttraumatic stress and substance dependence.

Published on May 1, 2020in Addictive Behaviors2.963
路 DOI :10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106283
Anka A. Vujanovic13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UH: University of Houston),
Lia J. Smith5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UH: University of Houston)
+ 2 AuthorsJoy M. Schmitz37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston)
Abstract
Abstract The co-occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUD) is highly prevalent and difficult-to-treat. Mindfulness, defined as nonjudgmental attention to and awareness of present-moment experiences, represents a targetable mechanism with potential to predict and improve treatment outcomes for PTSD/SUD populations. We hypothesized that greater self-reported mindfulness at baseline (pre-treatment) would predict (a) lower end-of-treatment PTSD severity and (b) greater longest sustained abstinence during a 12-week cognitive-behavioral treatment program. Participants included 53 inner-city adults meeting at least four symptoms of DSM-5 PTSD and current (DSM-IV) substance dependence (51% women; 75.5% African American; Mage=45.42, SD=9.99). Hierarchical regression analysis results indicated that higher levels of baseline mindfulness predicted lower end-of-treatment PTSD severity but not longest sustained abstinence from the primary substance of choice. Post hoc exploration of end-of-treatment PTSD symptom clusters indicated that higher baseline mindfulness predicted lower intrusion, negative alterations in cognitions and mood, and arousal and reactivity symptoms but not avoidance symptoms. Clinical and research implications are discussed.
  • References (72)
  • Citations (0)
馃摉 Papers frequently viewed together
3 Citations
87 Citations
9 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References72
Newest
#2Tracy L. Simpson (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 31
Last. Mary E. Larimer (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 56
view all 7 authors...
A significant subset of college students experience PTSD symptoms, and many engage in problematic alcohol use. Some college students with PTSD symptoms may use alcohol and other substances to cope with their symptoms, and those with PTSD experience more negative alcohol and drug consequences than those without PTSD. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have been successfully utilized for individuals with PTSD or substance use disorders. However, to date, no studies have evaluated MBIs for coll...
1 CitationsSource
#1Anka A. Vujanovic (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 13
#2Lia J. Smith (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 5
Last. Joy M. Schmitz (University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston)H-Index: 37
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUD) are complex psychiatric conditions that commonly co-occur. No preferred, evidence-based treatments for PTSD/SUD comorbidity are presently available. Promising integrated treatments have combined prolonged exposure therapy with cognitive-behavioral relapse prevention therapy for SUD. We describe a case study that showcases a novel, integrated cognitive-behavioral treatment approach for PTSD/SUD, entitled Treatment of ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Eric C. Meyer (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 18
#2Yvette Z. Szabo (TU: Temple University)
Last. Sandra B. Morissette (UTSA: University of Texas at San Antonio)H-Index: 18
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a major challenge among war veterans. This study assessed the contribution of several interrelated, modifiable psychosocial factors to changes in PTSD symptom severity among combat-deployed post-9/11 Veterans. Data were drawn from a longitudinal study of predictors of mental health and functional outcomes among U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan war Veterans ( N =鈥117). This study assessed the unique contribution of psychological flexibility, mindfulness, ...
Source
#1Sudie E. Back (MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)H-Index: 35
#2Therese K. Killeen (MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)H-Index: 25
Last. Kathleen T. Brady (MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)H-Index: 75
view all 10 authors...
Abstract Objective A substantial amount of individuals with substance use disorders (SUD) also meet criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Prolonged Exposure (PE) is an effective, evidence-based treatment for PTSD, but there is limited data on its use among individuals with current alcohol or drug use disorders. This study evaluated the efficacy of an integrated treatment that incorporates PE (Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure or COPE) ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Thomas LyonsH-Index: 7
#2Veronica Y. Womack (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 4
Last. Thomas K. Kenemore (CSU: Chicago State University)H-Index: 3
view all 4 authors...
AbstractBackground: More than half of prisoners in the United States are estimated to suffer from a substance use disorder. Mindfulness involves attention to the present moment, and nonjudgmental a...
Source
#1Mostafa Jasbi (IAU: Islamic Azad University)H-Index: 1
#2Dena Sadeghi Bahmani (University of Basel)H-Index: 9
Last. Serge Brand (University of Basel)H-Index: 36
view all 9 authors...
AbstractEven 30 or more years after the end of a war, veterans can suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In the present study, we explored the influence on symptoms of PTSD among Iranian veterans of the Iran鈥揑raq war of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) as add-on to a standard treatment with citalopram. Forty-eight male veterans with PTSD (mean age: 52.97 years) took part in this eight-week intervention study. Standard treatment for all patients consisted of citalopram (30鈥...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jordan P. Davis (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 11
#2Daniel J. Berry (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 34
Last. Brent W. Roberts (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana鈥揅hampaign)H-Index: 68
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Objective Mindfulness based relapse prevention (MBRP) has demonstrated efficacy in alleviating substance use, stress, and craving but how MBRP works for marginalized young adults has not been investigated. The current study used a novel rolling group format for MBRP as an additional intervention for young adults in residential treatment. We tested the hypothesis that MBRP (plus Treatment as usual (TAU)) would reduce stress, craving, and substance use among young adults in residential tr...
7 CitationsSource
#1Lisa R. Fortuna (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 13
#2Michelle V. Porche (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 13
Last. Auralyd Padilla (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Objective Substance use is common among adolescents with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We aimed to develop and study an integrated treatment for adolescents with co-occurring disorders. Design This is a therapy development and open pilot trial study of a manualized therapy for adolescents with post-traumatic stress, depression, and substance use that uses a combination of cognitive therapy (CT) and mindfulness. Methods Descriptive statistics and paired sample t-tests were calculated to ...
8 CitationsSource
#1Anka A. Vujanovic (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 13
#2Lia J. Smith (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 5
Last. Joy M. Schmitz (University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston)H-Index: 37
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUD) are complex psychiatric conditions that commonly co-occur. No evidence-based, 鈥榞old standard鈥 treatments for PTSD/SUD comorbidity are currently available. The present pilot randomized clinical trial was designed to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a novel, integrated cognitive-behavioral treatment approach for PTSD/SUD, entitled Treatment of Integrated Posttraumatic Stress and Substance Use (TIPSS...
6 CitationsSource
#1Jenna E. Boyd (McMaster University)H-Index: 4
#2Ruth A. Lanius (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 46
Last. Margaret C. McKinnon (St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton)H-Index: 29
view all 3 authors...
20 CitationsSource
Cited By0
Newest