Icons / Logo / Facebook Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / Google Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / ORCID Created with Sketch. Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

The earliest direct evidence of frogs in wet tropical forests from Cretaceous Burmese amber

Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
· DOI :10.1038/s41598-018-26848-w
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Edward L. Stanley9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Florida Museum of Natural History)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid C. Blackburn20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Florida Museum of Natural History)
Cite
Abstract
Frogs are a familiar and diverse component of tropical forests around the world. Yet there is little direct evidence from the fossil record for the antiquity of this association. We describe four fossil frog specimens from mid-Cretaceous (~99 mya) amber deposits from Kachin State, Myanmar for which the associated fauna provides rich paleoenvironmental context. Microcomputed tomographic analysis provides detailed three-dimensional anatomy for these small frogs, which is generally unavailable for articulated anurans in the Mesozoic. These crown-group anuran specimens provide the earliest direct evidence for anurans in a wet tropical forest. Based on a distinct combination of skeletal characters, at least one specimen has clear similarities to living alytoid frogs as well as several Mesozoic taxa known from the Jehol Biota in China. Whereas many Mesozoic frogs are from seasonal and mesic paleoenvironments, these fossils provide the earliest direct evidence of anurans in wet tropical forests.
  • References (41)
  • Citations (1)
Cite
References41
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Benjamin Sames9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Vienna)
+ 3 AuthorsWANXiaoqiao14
Estimated H-index: 14
(China University of Geosciences)
The mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (~99 Ma, Myanmar), widely known for exquisite preservation of theropods, also yields microfossils, which can provide important contextual information on paleoenvironment and amber formation. We report the first Cretaceous ostracod in amber—the gigantic (12.9 mm) right valve of an exclusively marine group (Myodocopa: Myodocopida) preserved in Burmese amber. Ostracods are usually small (0.5–2 mm), with well-calcified carapaces that provide an excellent fossil recor...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Gondwana Research 6.48
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsMing Bai15
Estimated H-index: 15
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Burmese amber has recently provided some detailed glimpses of plumage, soft tissues, and osteology of juvenile enantiornithine birds, but these insights have been restricted to isolated wing apices. Here we describe nearly half of a hatchling individual, based on osteological and soft tissue data obtained from the skull, neck, feet, and wing, and identified as a member of the extinct avian clade Enantiornithes. Preserved soft tissue provides the unique opportunity to observe the externa...
Yan‐Jie Feng2
Estimated H-index: 2
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University),
David C. Blackburn20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Florida Museum of Natural History)
+ 4 AuthorsPeng Zhang20
Estimated H-index: 20
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
Abstract Frogs (Anura) are one of the most diverse groups of vertebrates and comprise nearly 90% of living amphibian species. Their worldwide distribution and diverse biology make them well-suited for assessing fundamental questions in evolution, ecology, and conservation. However, despite their scientific importance, the evolutionary history and tempo of frog diversification remain poorly understood. By using a molecular dataset of unprecedented size, including 88-kb characters from 95 nuclear ...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in The American Naturalist 3.85
Daniel S. Moen13
Estimated H-index: 13
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
John J. Wiens78
Estimated H-index: 78
AbstractA major goal of ecology and evolutionary biology is to explain patterns of species richness among clades. Differences in rates of net diversification (speciation minus extinction over time) may often explain these patterns, but the factors that drive variation in diversification rates remain uncertain. Three important candidates are climatic niche position (e.g., whether clades are primarily temperate or tropical), rates of climatic niche change among species within clades, and microhabi...
Published on Mar 14, 2017in American Museum Novitates 1.60
Ke-Qin Gao20
Estimated H-index: 20
(PKU: Peking University),
Jianye Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
ABSTRACT Based on 12 well-preserved skeletons of postmetamorphic individuals, a new crown-group frog taxon is named and described from the Lower Cretaceous Guanghua (upper part of Longjiang) Formation (stratigraphic equivalent of the world-famed Yixian Formation) exposed in Dayangshu Basin, Hulunbuir, in the far northeast of Inner Mongolia, China. The new taxon, Genibatrachus baoshanensis, documents another Early Cretaceous anuran having reduction of the presacral vertebrae to eight in number, s...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.19
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Evolution 3.57
Daniel M. Portik11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of California, Berkeley),
David C. Blackburn20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Florida Museum of Natural History)
The reproductive modes of anurans (frogs and toads) are the most diverse of terrestrial vertebrates, and a major challenge is identifying selective factors that promote the evolution or retention of reproductive modes across clades. Terrestrialized anuran breeding strategies have evolved repeatedly from the plesiomorphic fully aquatic reproductive mode, a process thought to occur through intermediate reproductive stages. Several selective forces have been proposed for the evolution of terrestria...
Published on Sep 1, 2016in The American Naturalist 3.85
Kelly R. Zamudio38
Estimated H-index: 38
,
Rayna C. Bell11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 2 AuthorsCynthia P. A. Prado13
Estimated H-index: 13
AbstractFrog reproductive modes are complex phenotypes that include egg/clutch characteristics, oviposition site, larval development, and sometimes, parental care. Two evident patterns in the evolution of these traits are the higher diversity of reproductive modes in the tropics and the apparent progression from aquatic to terrestrial reproduction, often attributed to higher fitness resulting from decreased predation on terrestrial eggs and tadpoles. Here, we propose that sexual selection—and no...
Published on Jun 14, 2016in Contributions to Zoology 2.14
Eduardo Ascarrunz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Paris),
Jean-Claude Rage26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Paris)
+ 1 AuthorsMichel Laurin32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Paris)
Triadobatrachus massinoti is a batrachian known from a single fossil from the Early Triassic of Madagascar that presents a combination of apomorphic salientian and plesiomorphic batrachian characters. Herein we offer a revised description of the specimen based on X-ray micro-tomography data. We report previously unknown caudal vertebrae, possible mentomeckelians, and hidden parts of other structures. We also confirm the presence of a ventrolateral ledge on the opisthotic, and we rectify some pre...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 2.12
Viktor Baranov7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Gunnar Mikalsen Kvifte6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsXimena E. Bernal12
Estimated H-index: 12
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 2.12
Ana María Báez16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UBA: University of Buenos Aires),
Raúl O. Gómez1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UBA: University of Buenos Aires)
Abstract The anuran Wealdenbatrachus jucarensis Fey, 1988 is represented by several specimens, each consisting of an association of disarticulated bones preserved on slabs from a lignite mine near the village of Una, Cuenca Province, Spain, from which remains of plants and other vertebrates also have been recovered. The bearing unit, La Huerguina Formation, is estimated to be late Barremian in age. Originally these anuran specimens were considered to represent a crown-group costatan closer to th...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Current Biology 9.19
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 5 AuthorsFuming Lei (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Summary Recent discoveries of vertebrate remains trapped in middle Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar [ 1 , 2 ] have provided insights into the morphology of soft-tissue structures in extinct animals [ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ], in particular, into the evolution and paleobiology of early birds [ 4 , 8 , 9 ]. So far, five bird specimens have been described from Burmese amber: two isolated wings, an isolated foot with wing fragment, and two partial skeletons [ 4 , 8 , 9 , 10 ]. Most of these specime...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Breviora
Juan D. Daza14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Aaron M. Bauer39
Estimated H-index: 39
+ 3 AuthorsJ. B. Losos
Abstract We report the discovery of a new genus and species of amber-preserved lizard from the mid-Cretaceous of Myanmar. The fossil is one of the smallest and most complete Cretaceous lizards ever found, preserving both the articulated skeleton and remains of the muscular system and other soft tissues. Despite its completeness, its state of preservation obscures important diagnostic features. We determined its taxonomic allocation using two approaches: we used previously identified autapomorphi...