Lida Xing
Chinese Academy of Sciences
137Publications
18H-index
1,184Citations
Publications 137
Newest
Published on Jan 30, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.12
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Kansas)
+ 3 AuthorsLuis M. Chiappe42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. ...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Andrew J. Ross14
Estimated H-index: 14
(National Museum of Scotland)
+ 2 AuthorsRyan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
Abstract Gastropods are generally rare in amber. In this paper we describe an example of exceptional soft-bodied preservation in a fossil terrestrial mollusk-a snail shell with some tissue, including part of the cephalic region (head) with a tentacle and inferred eye stalk, and potentially part of the foot and operculum. The snail, a probable juvenile, is preserved in Burmese amber (Burmite) from Myanmar, of earliest Cenomanian age. Morphological evidence suggests a cyclophoroidean ancestry and ...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Kui Tong (Chengdu University of Technology)+ 6 AuthorsShan Jiang2
Estimated H-index: 2
The rapid rate of discovery of Lower Cretaceous tetrapod tracksites in terrestrial sequences on the Sichuan Basin area is such that the 2016 report of 21 sites in the Xiaoba, Feitianshan and Jiaguan Formations is now increased by ∼24%–26 sites. Of these seven occur in the Xiaoba Formation, including two new sites (Luogan and Apuruha) described here. Likewise, there has been a similar increase in reports of sites from the Jiaguan Formation, from 12 to 15 sites (=25%) in the same period. The total...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Geoscience frontiers 4.05
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Dongjie Tang (China University of Geosciences)+ 4 AuthorsBaoqiao Hao2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract The newly discovered large (350 m 2 ) Yantan dinosaur tracksite, in the Lower Jurassic Ziliujing Formation of Guizhou Province, China, reveals at least 250 footprints of which ∼97 can be resolved into trackways of sauropodomorphs. All the trackways are sub parallel likely indicating gregarious behavior. One theropod track (cf. Grallator ) was recorded. The sauropodomorph tracks predominantly represent quadrupedal progression (Morphotype A), and footprint morphology is similar to the ich...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
Lei Mao (China University of Geosciences), Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 2 AuthorsDonghao Wang (China University of Geosciences)
ABSTRACTThe Lufeng area is a key locality for Early and Middle Jurassic Chinese dinosaurs. This region is perhaps best known internationally for the co-occurrence of basal sauropodomorph-eusauropod dinosaurs and has therefore been an important research area since the 1930s. We review on a series of palaeoecological analyses in this paper and assess biomass, in particular, using skeletal fossils from this region and analyses of large living terrestrial vertebrates as well as new sporopollenin and...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Qing He1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Anhui University),
Qin Jiang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Anhui University)
+ 5 AuthorsQifeng Yin (Anhui University)
Abstract We analyzed identified oospecies and associated geochemical characteristics of newly discovered dinosaur eggs from the Cretaceous Hekou Formation in Yudu District, Jiangxi Province, China. Results reveal that the Yudu eggs can be identified as representatives of the known oospecies Macroolithus rugustus within Elongatoolithidae based on external shape, size, ornamentation, and internal microstructure between the columnar and cone layers. The major element found in Macroolithus rugustus ...
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Published on Feb 26, 2019in Journal of Palaeogeography
Da-Qing Li (Gansu Agricultural University), Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 3 AuthorsLongfeng Li (Gansu Agricultural University)
A new Middle Jurassic tracksite dominated by non-avian theropod footprints from the Wangjiashan Formation in Pingchuan District, Baojishan Basin, Gansu Province has yielded a unique trackway with four consecutive manus-pes sets. Only three previous examples, all Early Jurassic in age, of theropod trackways are known with convincing examples of manus tracks and in each case, only two tracks were recorded in association with pes tracks with metatarsal impressions and pelvic traces indicating crouc...
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Published on Mar 5, 2019in Acta Geologica Sinica-english Edition 2.51
Qing He (Anhui University), Shukang Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsSen Yang (Anhui University)
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Daqing Li12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 5 AuthorsWenze You
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xing Xu39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The vertebrate track Laiyangpus liui , from the Lower Cretaceous of Shandong Province in China has been the subject of misunderstanding and misinterpretation since it was discovered and named in 1960, and reposited in the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology collections in Beijing. It was initially misinterpreted as evidence of a coelurosaurian (non-avian theropod) trackmaker supposedly showing evidence of tridactyl manus and tetradactyl pes. This discredited concl...
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