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Why is your boss making you sick? A longitudinal investigation modeling time‐lagged relations between abusive supervision and employee physical health

Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Organizational Behavior 5.00
· DOI :10.1002/job.2248
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University),
Samuel Hanig2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UW: University of Waterloo)
+ 2 AuthorsHuiwen Lian11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UK: University of Kentucky)
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  • References (98)
  • Citations (2)
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References98
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Journal of Management 9.06
Thomas Fischer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNIL: University of Lausanne),
Joerg Dietz19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UNIL: University of Lausanne),
John Antonakis30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UNIL: University of Lausanne)
In organizational research, studying “processes” is important for uncovering and understanding the underlying causal mechanisms in a predictor-mediator-outcome logic. Processes answer “how” and “why” questions and provide more complete explanations about phenomena. Our focus in this review is on studies of leadership processes, which we systematically analyze to report on the state of the science. In doing so, we present a two-dimensional target-centric taxonomy to integrate previous research: T...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Journal of Management 9.06
Lisa E. Baranik9
Estimated H-index: 9
(ECU: East Carolina University),
Mo Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UF: University of Florida)
+ 1 AuthorsJunqi Shi24
Estimated H-index: 24
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
The current study examined employee outcomes associated with customer mistreatment, conceptualizing customer mistreatment as signaling failure regarding employees’ pursuit of task and social goals at work. We argue that employees make internal attributions when experiencing customer mistreatment and are likely to engage in rumination because of this perceived goal failure. The goal of this article was to test this conceptualization and examine the outcomes of customer mistreatment–induced rumina...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Academy of Management Journal 7.19
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UW: University of Waterloo),
Huiwen Lian11
Estimated H-index: 11
(HKUST: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa M. Keeping14
Estimated H-index: 14
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
Building on prior work which has shown that abusive supervision is a reaction to subordinates’ poor performance, we develop a self-control framework to outline when and why supervisors abuse poor-performing subordinates. In particular, we argue that poor-performing subordinates instill in supervisors a sense of hostility toward the subordinate, which in turn leads to engaging in abusive supervision. Within this self-control framework, poor performance is more likely to lead to abusive supervisio...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Applied Psychology 3.27
Yihao Liu9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UF: University of Florida),
Shenjiang Mo6
Estimated H-index: 6
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
+ 1 AuthorsMo Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UF: University of Florida)
There is an increasing call for the collection of longitudinal data and the use of longitudinal analysis in occupational health psychology research. Some useful and popular longitudinal analysis techniques include the cross-lagged model, the latent growth model, and the latent change score model. However, previous reviews and discussions on these modeling techniques are quite generic and often overlook the connections among these techniques. Therefore, in the current article, we first reviewed t...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Applied Psychology 5.07
Kai Chi Yam11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NUS: National University of Singapore),
Ryan Fehr12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UW: University of Washington)
+ 2 AuthorsScott J. Reynolds16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UW: University of Washington)
In this study, we examined how leaders' customer interactions influence their tendency to abuse their followers. Specifically, we drew from ego-depletion theory to suggest that surface acting during customer interactions depletes leaders of their self-control resources, resulting in elevated levels of abusive supervision. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the effect of surface acting on abusive supervision is moderated by leaders' trait self-control, such that leaders with high trait self-contro...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology 5.13
Wong Jh1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Saint Mary's University),
Kelloway Ek6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Saint Mary's University)
We investigated the relationship between workplace supervisory social interactions and blood pressure outcomes using hourly diary entries and ambulatory blood pressure data from an experience sampling study of 55 long-term care employees. After accounting for relevant cardiovascular controls, significant effects of supervisory interactions on cardiovascular reactivity and recovery were found. Multilevel analyses revealed that negatively perceived supervisory interactions predicted higher systoli...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Applied Psychology 5.07
Lauren S. Simon10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Charlice Hurst7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 1 AuthorsTimothy A. Judge98
Estimated H-index: 98
Fundamental to the definition of abusive supervision is the notion that subordinates are often victims of a pattern of mistreatment (Tepper, 2000). However, little research has examined the processes through which such destructive relational patterns emerge. In this study, we draw from and extend the multimotive model of reactions to interpersonal threat (Smart Richman & Leary, 2009) to formulate and test hypotheses about how employees' emotional and behavioral responses may ameliorate or worsen...
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Administrative Science Quarterly 8.02
Michael S. Christian16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Noah Eisenkraft11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Chaitali Paresh Kapadia1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Using data from two experience-sampling studies, this paper investigates the dynamic relationships between discretionary behaviors at work—voluntary tasks that employees perform—and internal somatic complaints, focusing specifically on a person’s pain fluctuations. Integrating theories of human energy with evidence from the organizational, psychological, and medical sciences, we argue that pain both depletes and redirects the allocation of employees’ energy. We hypothesize that somatic pain is a...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Applied Psychology 5.07
Frank Walter16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Giessen),
Catherine K. Lam10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CityU: City University of Hong Kong)
+ 2 AuthorsQing Miao13
Estimated H-index: 13
(ZJU: Zhejiang University)
Drawing from moral exclusion theory, this article examines outcome dependence and interpersonal liking as key boundary conditions for the linkage between perceived subordinate performance and abusive supervision. Moreover, it investigates the role of abusive supervision for subordinates’ subsequent, objective work performance. Across 2 independent studies, an experimental scenario study (N = 157; Study 1) and a time-lagged field study (N = 169; Study 2), the negative relationship between perceiv...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Applied Psychology 5.07
Erin Cooke Long1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Michael S. Christian16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
We investigate the role of mindfulness as a regulatory factor by examining whether it mitigates the relationship between justice and retaliation. Drawing on theories of self-regulation, we integrate work on justice with emerging frameworks that identify mindfulness as an important work-related regulatory variable (Glomb, Duffy, Bono, & Yang, 2011). Specifically, we identify the role of mindfulness as a buffer of the ruminative thoughts and negative emotions that link injustice to retaliation. We...
Cited By2
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Organizational Behavior 5.00
Tim Vantilborgh10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel),
Joeri Hofmans19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vrije Universiteit Brussel),
Timothy A. Judge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Max M. Fisher College of Business)
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Leadership Quarterly 5.63
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University),
Douglas J. Brown29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UW: University of Waterloo)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa M. Keeping14
Estimated H-index: 14
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
Abstract When a subordinate receives abusive treatment from a supervisor, a natural response is to retaliate against the supervisor. Although retaliation is dysfunctional and should be discouraged, we examine the potential functional role retaliation plays in terms of alleviating the negative consequences of abusive supervision on subordinate justice perceptions. Based on the notion that retaliation following mistreatment can restore justice for victims, we propose a model whereby retaliation fo...