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Samuel Hanig
University of Waterloo
7Publications
4H-index
63Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Navio Kwok (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 2
#2Samuel Hanig (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 4
Last.Winny Shen (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 13
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Contemporary theories on leadership development emphasize the importance of having a leader identity in building leadership skills and functioning effectively as leaders. We build on this approach by unpacking the role leader identity plays in the leader emergence process. Taking the perspective that leadership is a dynamic social process between group members, we propose a social network-based process model whereby leader role identity predicts network centrality (i.e., betweenness and...
3 CitationsSource
#1Lindie H. Liang (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 6
#2Samuel Hanig (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 4
Last.Huiwen Lian (UK: University of Kentucky)H-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Lindie H. LiangH-Index: 6
#2Lisa M. KeepingH-Index: 14
Last.Huiwen LianH-Index: 11
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Lindie H. Liang (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 6
#2Douglas J. Brown (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 32
Last.Lisa M. Keeping (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 14
view all 6 authors...
Abstract When a subordinate receives abusive treatment from a supervisor, a natural response is to retaliate against the supervisor. Although retaliation is dysfunctional and should be discouraged, we examine the potential functional role retaliation plays in terms of alleviating the negative consequences of abusive supervision on subordinate justice perceptions. Based on the notion that retaliation following mistreatment can restore justice for victims, we propose a model whereby retaliation fo...
4 CitationsSource
#1Lindie H. Liang (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 6
#2Douglas J. Brown (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 32
Last.Lisa M. Keeping (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 14
view all 6 authors...
On the basis of the notion that the ability to exert self-control is critical to the regulation of aggressive behaviors, we suggest that mindfulness, an aspect of the self-control process, plays a key role in curbing workplace aggression. In particular, we note the conceptual and empirical distinctions between dimensions of mindfulness (i.e., mindful awareness and mindful acceptance) and investigate their respective abilities to regulate workplace aggression. In an experimental study (Study 1), ...
6 CitationsSource
#1Lindie H. Liang (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 6
#2Huiwen Lian (HKUST: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 11
Last.Lisa M. Keeping (WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)H-Index: 14
view all 6 authors...
Building on prior work which has shown that abusive supervision is a reaction to subordinates’ poor performance, we develop a self-control framework to outline when and why supervisors abuse poor-performing subordinates. In particular, we argue that poor-performing subordinates instill in supervisors a sense of hostility toward the subordinate, which in turn leads to engaging in abusive supervision. Within this self-control framework, poor performance is more likely to lead to abusive supervisio...
46 CitationsSource
#1Samuel HanigH-Index: 4
#2Lindie H. LiangH-Index: 6
Last.Douglas J. BrownH-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
Supervisor-directed deviance is a well-established consequence of abusive supervision. In the present research we use social network methods to integrate and extend existing accounts of the psychol...
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