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The effectiveness of post-reading word-focused activities and their associations with working memory

Published on Nov 1, 2017in System 1.93
· DOI :10.1016/j.system.2017.09.012
Yingli Yang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UIBE: Beijing Institute of Foreign Trade),
Natsuko Shintani13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Auckland)
+ 1 AuthorsYingyi Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UIBE: Beijing Institute of Foreign Trade)
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Abstract
Abstract The study investigates the effects of post-reading word-focused activities on vocabulary acquisition and the extent to which the effects are mediated by learners' working memory. Eighty-one university students were assigned to three experimental groups (Gap-fill, Sentence-writing, Comprehension-only) and a Control group. After completing a reading comprehension task, the Gap-fill and Sentence-writing groups completed word-focused activities, and the Comprehension-only group answered an essay question without receiving any form-focused instruction; the Control group only completed the tests. The Vocabulary Knowledge Scale developed by Paribakht and Wesche (1997) was employed to measure treatment effects, and a reading span test was used to measure the learners’ working memory capacities. The results show that on the immediate post-test, the Sentence-writing group performed the best, followed by Gap-fill, Comprehension-only, and Control. On the delayed post-test, the Sentence writing and Gap-fill groups equally outperformed the two other groups. Linear regression analysis revealed that working memory significantly predicted the gain scores of the Comprehension-only and the Gap-fill groups on the immediate post-test. Our results partially confirm the Task Involvement Load Hypothesis and suggest an interaction between working memory and the effects of different types of vocabulary instruction.
  • References (41)
  • Citations (2)
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References41
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Language Testing in Asia
Yan Jin4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University),
Zunmin Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(BNU: Beijing Normal University)
+ 1 AuthorsWeiwei Song1
Estimated H-index: 1
Background A project has recently been proposed by the National Education Examinations Authority, P. R. China, to develop a national framework of reference for English language education, provisionally called China Standards of English (CSE). In this article, we argue for the necessity of developing the framework of reference in China and challenges facing such an important endeavor.
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Language Testing in Asia
Wen Zhao1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northeastern University),
Boran Wang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northeastern University)
+ 1 AuthorsBingxue Xie1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northeastern University)
Background The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) (Council of Europe 2001) has, over the past decade, come to be widely used as a reference tool for teaching, learning and assessment (Alderson 2002; North 2014). The focus of the current study is on scaling the China Standards of English (CSE) vocabulary descriptors for College English education in Mainland China, where College English education refers to English language education for non-English major students at tertiary level. A re...
Published on Feb 23, 2017
Shaofeng Li16
Estimated H-index: 16
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Applied Linguistics 3.04
Natsuko Shintani13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Auckland)
This article reports a meta-analysis of 42 experiments in 33 published studies involving processing instruction (PI) and production-based instruction (PB) used in the PI studies. The comparative effectiveness of PI and PB showed that although PI was more effective than PB for developing receptive knowledge, PB was just as effective as PI for productive knowledge. Furthermore, the PB proved superior to the PI for productive knowledge when both groups received the same explicit information. The mo...
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 3.70
Jared A. Linck9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park),
Peter Osthus1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael F. Bunting14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
Although working memory (WM) figures centrally in many theories of second language (L2) proficiency development and processing, some have argued that the importance of WM is overstated (e.g., Juffs, Transactions of the Philological Society, 102, 199–225, 2004). Despite many studies over the past two decades, the literature lacks a quantitative synthesis of the extant results. In this article, we report a meta-analysis of data from 79 samples involving 3,707 participants providing 748 effect size...
Published on Sep 1, 2013in The Modern Language Journal 3.76
Shaofeng Li16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Auckland)
This study investigated the interactions between two types of feedback (implicit vs. explicit) and two aptitude components (language analytic ability and working memory) in second language Chinese learning. Seventy-eight L2 Chinese learners from two large U.S. universities were assigned to three dyadic NS-NNS interaction conditions and received implicit (recasts), explicit (metalinguistic correction), or no feedback (control) in response to their non-target-like oral production of Chinese classi...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in The Modern Language Journal 3.76
Shufen Huang3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Victor L. Willson25
Estimated H-index: 25
(A&M: Texas A&M University),
Zohreh R. Eslami13
Estimated H-index: 13
(A&M: Texas A&M University)
This meta-analytic study provides a systematic statistical synthesis of the effects of output tasks on second or foreign incidental vocabulary learning. A total of 12 studies were included in this meta-analysis. Five mediator variables were examined: design quality, types of output task, time on task, genres of text, and text-target word ratios. Results show that language learners who completed an output task outperformed those who only read a text. Results also support the involvement load hypo...
Published on Sep 1, 2012in Studies in Second Language Acquisition 2.60
Katherine I. Martin3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UM: University of Michigan),
Nick C. Ellis51
Estimated H-index: 51
(UM: University of Michigan)
Cited By2
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in TESOL Quarterly 2.72
Chi‐Duc Nguyen , Frank Boers22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UWO: University of Western Ontario)
Published on Jul 12, 2018in Frontiers in Psychology 2.13
Simón Ruiz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Tübingen),
Simón Ruiz2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Tübingen)
+ 0 AuthorsPatrick Rebuschat14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Tübingen)
This study examined the simultaneous acquisition of vocabulary and grammar by adult learners and the role of exposure condition and declarative memory. Most experimental studies investigating the acquisition of artificial or natural languages focus on either vocabulary or grammar, but not both. However, a systematic investigation of the simultaneous learning of multiple linguistic features is important given that it mirrors language learning outside the lab. Native English speakers were exposed ...