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The Impact of Different Forms of #fitspiration Imagery on Body Image, Mood, and Self-Objectification among Young Women

Published on Sep 12, 2017in Sex Roles 2.02
· DOI :10.1007/s11199-017-0830-3
Ivanka Prichard11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Flinders University),
Annabel C. McLachlan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Flinders University)
+ 1 AuthorsMarika Tiggemann74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Flinders University)
Abstract
The present study experimentally examined the impact of different forms of inspirational fitness images (“fitspiration”) on women’s body image. Australian female participants (n = 152, 17–30 years-old; M age = 21.55, SD = 3.94) were randomly assigned to view fitspiration media which depicted the body in a functional (performing exercise) or non-functional (posed) way, with or without accompanying appearance-focused text. There were no main effects of image type or text presence for body satisfaction, mood, or state self-objectification. However, state body satisfaction decreased and negative mood increased over time following exposure to the fitspiration images. Trait self-objectification moderated the impact of image type and text on state body satisfaction, such that viewing functional images presented with appearance-focused text resulted in poorer body satisfaction for women with higher trait self-objectification, but not for those with lower self-objectification. The findings demonstrate that irrespective of focus or presence of text, exposure to fitspiration images decreases body satisfaction and increases negative mood, highlighting the potential negative consequences of engaging with fitspiration media.
  • References (37)
  • Citations (9)
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References37
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Journal of Health Psychology 2.04
Marika Tiggemann74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Flinders University),
Mia Zaccardo3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Flinders University)
‘Fitspiration’ is an online trend designed to inspire viewers towards a healthier lifestyle by promoting exercise and healthy food. This study provides a content analysis of fitspiration imagery on the social networking site Instagram. A set of 600 images were coded for body type, activity, objectification and textual elements. Results showed that the majority of images of women contained only one body type: thin and toned. In addition, most images contained objectifying elements. Accordingly, w...
49 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of Health Psychology 2.04
Kate E. Mulgrew6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of the Sunshine Coast),
Marika Tiggemann74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Flinders University)
We examined whether shifting young women’s (N =322) attention toward functionality components of media-portrayed idealized images would protect against body dissatisfaction. Image type was manipulated via images of models in either an objectified body-as-object form or active body-as-process form; viewing focus was manipulated via questions about the appearance or functionality of the models. Social comparison was examined as a moderator. Negative outcomes were most pronounced within the process...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Body Image 3.60
Lily Robinson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Flinders University),
Ivanka Prichard11
Estimated H-index: 11
(RMIT: RMIT University)
+ 3 AuthorsMarika Tiggemann74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Flinders University)
Abstract Recent studies have documented a shift in the cultural ideal of physical attractiveness, with women subscribing to a visibly toned ideal that emphasises health and fitness. The present study experimentally investigated the impact of athletic and muscular fitness-idealised images compared to traditional thin ideal images on women’s body dissatisfaction and exercise behaviour, under the framework of Social Comparison Theory. Participants were 106 female undergraduate students randomly ass...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 29, 2017in Journal of Medical Internet Research 4.67
Elise R. Carrotte8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Burnet Institute),
Ivanka Prichard11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Flinders University),
Megan S. C. Lim20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Burnet Institute)
Background: “Fitspiration” (also known as “fitspo”) aims to inspire individuals to exercise and be healthy, but emerging research indicates exposure can negatively impact female body image. Fitspiration is frequently accessed on social media; however, it is currently unclear the degree to which messages about body image and exercise differ by gender of the subject. Objective: The aim of our study was to conduct a content analysis to identify the characteristics of fitspiration content posted acr...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in International Journal of Eating Disorders 3.90
Grace Holland2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Flinders University),
Marika Tiggemann74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Flinders University)
35 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Leisure Studies 2.25
Stephanie T. Jong2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Flinders University),
Murray Drummond16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Flinders University)
AbstractWhile previous studies have investigated online health communities and health-seeking behaviours, less attention has been directed at the growing impact of the online fitness movement. This paper draws on the concept of biopedagogies to examine the messages transmitted within fitness culture on social networking sites (SNSs), and their role as a channel for health and fitness information. To explore this, a multi-method approach was conducted. The two methods included a netnography (onli...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 15, 2016in International Journal of Eating Disorders 3.90
Grace Holland BPsych1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Flinders University),
Marika Tiggemann Ba1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Flinders University)
Objective Fitspiration is a recent Internet trend designed to motivate people to eat healthily and to exercise. The aim of the study was to investigate disordered eating and exercise in women who post fitspiration on Instagram. Method Participants were 101 women who post fitspiration images on Instagram and a comparison group of 102 women who post travel images. Both groups completed measures of disordered eating and compulsive exercise. Results Women who post fitspiration images scored signific...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Body Image 3.60
Jessica M. Alleva9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
J.R. Veldhuis9
Estimated H-index: 9
(VU: VU University Amsterdam),
Carolien Martijn19
Estimated H-index: 19
This pilot study explored whether focusing on body functionality (i.e., everything the body can do) can protect women from potential harmful effects of exposure to thin-ideal images. Seventy women (Mage=20.61) completed an assignment wherein they either described the functionality of their body or the routes that they often travel (control). Afterward, participants were exposed to a series of thin-ideal images. Appearance and functionality satisfaction were measured before the assignment; appear...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Body Image 3.60
Leah Boepple3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USF: University of South Florida),
Rheanna N. Ata5
Estimated H-index: 5
(USF: University of South Florida)
+ 1 AuthorsJ. Kevin Thompson70
Estimated H-index: 70
(USF: University of South Florida)
Abstract “Fitspiration” websites are media that aim to inspire people to live healthy and fit lifestyles through motivating images and text related to exercise and diet. Given the link between similar Internet content (i.e., healthy living blogs) and problematic messages, we hypothesized that content on these sites would over-emphasize appearance and promote problematic messages regarding exercise and diet. Keywords “fitspo” and “fitspiration” were entered into search engines. The first 10 image...
36 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016in International Journal of Eating Disorders 3.90
Leah Boepple3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USF: University of South Florida),
J. Kevin Thompson70
Estimated H-index: 70
(USF: University of South Florida)
Objective “Pro-ana” or Thinspiration websites are internet sites that support weight loss and eating disorders. Fitspiration websites are a newer type of site that supposedly advocates a fit and healthy lifestyle. Method The first 10 images from a sample of 50 Fitspiration and 50 Thinspiration websites, chosen using a standard internet search protocol, were rated on a variety of weight, eating, and appearance characteristics. χ2 analyses were conducted to compare website content. Results Thinspi...
57 Citations Source Cite
Cited By9
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Body Image 3.60
Diana E. Betz3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Loyola University Maryland),
Natalie J. Sabik6
Estimated H-index: 6
(URI: University of Rhode Island),
Laura R. Ramsey9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Bridgewater State University)
Abstract Body dissatisfaction and self-objectification can arise when women view idealized thin bodies, as well as idealized athletic or curvy bodies. State-level social comparisons have been shown to mediate such effects, with mixed evidence for the moderating role of trait-level social comparison. An experiment tested the hypotheses that viewing messages idealizing thin, athletic, and curvy bodies would be associated with greater state social comparison as compared to a body acceptance conditi...
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Published on May 4, 2019in Fat Studies
Jennifer B. Webb12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte),
Erin Vinoski Thomas1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)
+ 3 AuthorsDavina Y. Putz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNCC: University of North Carolina at Charlotte)
ABSTRACTContemporary fat studies scholarship seeks to challenge and critique the normative weightist lens through which modern social media for example stereotypically represent the embodiment of higher-weight individuals or the typical underrepresentation of body diversity in the cases of mainstream Fitspiration and yoga lifestyle media. Simultaneously, proponents of the fat acceptance/body positivity movement are currently at odds over the increasingly expansive appropriation of the term curvy...
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Alice Beatrice Prefit (International Institute of Minnesota), Diana-Mirela Cândea1
Estimated H-index: 1
(International Institute of Minnesota),
Aurora Szentágotai-Tătar3
Estimated H-index: 3
(International Institute of Minnesota)
Background In recent years, research has increasingly focused on body dissatisfaction, which is associated with numerous negative psychological and physical health consequences and, more importantly, with the development and maintenance of eating pathology.
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in New Media & Society 3.12
Scott J. Fatt1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Jasmine Fardouly9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Ronald M. Rapee75
Estimated H-index: 75
Exposure to fitspiration content via social media can influence women’s body satisfaction and exercise inspiration, but fitspiration exposure has not been investigated in men. This study examined links between the frequency of viewing fitspiration content on Instagram, and men’s body satisfaction, appearance-based exercise motivation and health-based exercise motivation, and whether those relationships were mediated by muscular-ideal internalisation and/or appearance comparison tendency. Partici...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Public Health 2.42
Michelle Raggatt1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Burnet Institute),
Cassandra J. C. Wright6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Monash University)
+ 4 AuthorsMegan S. C. Lim20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Monash University)
Background Fitspiration is a popular social media trend containing images, quotes and advice related to exercise and healthy eating. This study aimed to 1) describe the types of fitspiration content that users access and how they engage with content, 2) investigate the disordered eating and exercise behaviours and psychological distress of individuals who access fitspiration, and 3) understand the perceived influence of fitspiration on health and wellbeing.
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Body Image 3.60
Scott Griffiths14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Melbourne),
David Castle56
Estimated H-index: 56
(University of Melbourne)
+ 3 AuthorsFiona Kate Barlow19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Abstract Thinspiration and fitspiration are classes of social media content characterised by idealised depictions of excessively thin and overtly fit/lean bodies, respectively. It is currently unknown whether and how exposure to thinspiration and fitspiration relates to symptom severity within high-risk clinical populations. Thus, in a clinical sample of individuals with eating disorders, we evaluated a model explaining how exposure to thinspiration and fitspiration relates to eating disorder sy...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 13, 2018in Frontiers in Psychology 2.09
Rotem Kahalon3
Estimated H-index: 3
(TAU: Tel Aviv University),
Nurit Shnabel15
Estimated H-index: 15
(TAU: Tel Aviv University),
Julia C. Becker21
Estimated H-index: 21
This paper provides an organizing framework for the experimental research on the effects of state self-objectification on women. We explain why this body of work, which had grown rapidly in the last 20 years, departs from the original formulation of objectification theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997). We compare the different operationalizations of state self-objectification and examine how they map onto its theoretical definition, concluding that the operationalizations have focused mostly on ...
1 Citations Source Cite