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Orbitofrontal Cortex Activity and Connectivity Predict Future Depression Symptoms in Adolescence

Published on Oct 1, 2017in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
· DOI :10.1016/j.bpsc.2017.02.002
Jingwen Jin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Ananth Narayanan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 6 AuthorsAprajita Mohanty19
Estimated H-index: 19
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
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Abstract
Abstract Background Major depressive disorder is a leading cause of disability worldwide; however, little is known about pathological mechanisms involved in its development. Research in adolescent depression has focused on reward sensitivity and striatal mechanisms implementing it. The contribution of loss sensitivity to future depression, as well as the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) mechanisms critical for processing losses and rewards, remains unexplored. Furthermore, it is unclear whether OFC functioning interacts with familial history in predicting future depression. Methods In this longitudinal study, we recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging data while 229 female adolescents with or without parental history of depression completed a monetary gambling task. We examined whether OFC blood oxygen level–dependent response and functional connectivity during loss and win feedback was associated with depression symptoms concurrently and prospectively (9 months later) and whether this relationship was moderated by parental history of depression. Results Reduced OFC response during loss was associated with higher depression symptoms concurrently and prospectively, even after controlling for concurrent depression, specifically in adolescents with parental history of depression. Similarly, increased OFC-posterior insula connectivity during loss was associated with future depression symptoms, but this relationship was not moderated by parental history of depression. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence for loss-related alterations in OFC functioning and its interaction with familial history of depression as possible mechanisms in the development of depression. While the current functional magnetic resonance imaging literature has mainly focused on reward, the current findings underscore the need to include prefrontal loss processing in existing developmental models of depression.
  • References (73)
  • Citations (4)
Cite
References73
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2016in American Journal of Psychiatry13.65
Brady D. Nelson17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Greg Perlman12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
Objective:A blunted neural response to rewards has recently emerged as a potential mechanistic biomarker of adolescent depression. The reward positivity, an event-related potential elicited by feedback indicating monetary gain relative to loss, has been associated with risk for depression. The authors examined whether the reward positivity prospectively predicted the development of depression 18 months later in a large community sample of adolescent girls.Method:The sample included 444 girls 13....
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Biological Psychiatry11.50
Xiaoqian J. Chai14
Estimated H-index: 14
(McGovern Institute for Brain Research),
Dina R. Hirshfeld-Becker30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Harvard University)
+ 10 AuthorsElana Kagan5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Harvard University)
Abstract Background Neuroimaging studies of patients with major depression have revealed abnormal intrinsic functional connectivity measured during the resting state in multiple distributed networks. However, it is unclear whether these findings reflect the state of major depression or reflect trait neurobiological underpinnings of risk for major depression. Methods We compared resting-state functional connectivity, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging, between unaffected children...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Nature Neuroscience21.13
Jue Xie1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Camillo Padoa-Schioppa20
Estimated H-index: 20
Different neurons in orbitofrontal cortex encode the input and the output of economic decisions. The authors demonstrate that this neural circuit is both stable and flexible. When different goods are available for choice, individual neurons adapt to the new behavioral context while preserving their function in the decision circuit.
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Trends in Cognitive Sciences16.17
Katherine R. Luking11
Estimated H-index: 11
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
David Pagliaccio15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NIH: National Institutes of Health)
+ 1 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
Striatal response to reward has been of great interest in the typical development and psychopathology literatures. These parallel lines of inquiry demonstrate that although typically developing adolescents show robust striatal response to reward, adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) and those at high risk for MDD show a blunted response to reward. Understanding how these findings intersect is crucial for the development and application of early preventative interventions in at-risk c...
Katherine R. Luking11
Estimated H-index: 11
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
David Pagliaccio15
Estimated H-index: 15
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
+ 1 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
Objective Maternal major depressive disorder (MDD) increases risk for MDD and predicts reduced reward responding in adolescent offspring. However, it is unclear whether alterations in neural response to reward can be detected in school-aged children at high risk before the typical increase in reward response observed in adolescence. Method To assess relationships between neural response to gain/loss feedback, MDD risk, and child depressive symptoms, 47 psychiatrically healthy 7- to 10-year-old c...
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Scientific Reports4.01
Qing Gao12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Ke Zou7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 2 AuthorsHuafu Chen44
Estimated H-index: 44
Some efforts were done to investigate the disruption of brain causal connectivity networks involved in major depressive disorder (MDD) using Granger causality (GC) analysis. However, the homogenous hemodynamic response function (HRF) assumption over the brain may disturb the inference of temporal precedence. Here we applied a blind deconvolution approach to examine the altered HRF shape in first-episode, drug-naive MDD patients. The regions with abnormal HRF shape in patients were chosen as seed...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Frontiers in Psychology2.13
Tiffany C. Ho14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco),
Shunan Zhang9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
+ 6 AuthorsTony T. Yang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
While the extant literature has focused on major depressive disorder (MDD) as being characterized by abnormalities in processing affective stimuli (e.g., facial expressions), little is known regarding which specific aspects of cognition influence the evaluation of affective stimuli, and what are the underlying neural correlates. To investigate these issues, we assessed 26 adolescents diagnosed with MDD and 37 well-matched healthy controls (HCL) who completed an emotion identification task of dyn...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Emotion3.13
Katherine R. Luking11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
David Pagliaccio15
Estimated H-index: 15
+ 1 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
The large impact of loss of reward on behavior has been well documented in adult populations. However, whether responsiveness to loss relative to gain is similarly elevated in child versus adult populations remains unclear. It is also unclear whether relations between incentive behaviors and self-reported reward/punishment sensitivity are similar within different developmental stages. To investigate these questions, 7–10-year-old children (N=70) and young adults (N=70) completed the Behavioral I...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in American Journal of Psychiatry13.65
Argyris Stringaris31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Pablo Vidal-Ribas Belil1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 34 AuthorsMaren Struve17
Estimated H-index: 17
Objective:The authors examined whether alterations in the brain’s reward network operate as a mechanism across the spectrum of risk for depression. They then tested whether these alterations are specific to anhedonia as compared with low mood and whether they are predictive of depressive outcomes.Method:Functional MRI was used to collect blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses to anticipation of reward in the monetary incentive task in 1,576 adolescents in a community-based sample. Adolesc...
Published on Nov 11, 2015in The Journal of Neuroscience6.07
Jingwen Jin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Christina Zelano12
Estimated H-index: 12
(NU: Northwestern University)
+ 1 AuthorsAprajita Mohanty19
Estimated H-index: 19
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Although the amygdala is a major locus for hedonic processing, how it encodes valence information is poorly understood. Given the hedonic potency of odor stimuli and the amygdala9s anatomical proximity to the peripheral olfactory system, we combined high-resolution fMRI with pattern-based multivariate techniques to examine how valence information is encoded in the amygdala. Ten human subjects underwent fMRI scanning while smelling 9 odorants that systematically varied in perceived valence. Repre...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on 2019in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience4.92
Yara Toenders (University of Melbourne), Laura S. van Velzen (University of Melbourne)+ 3 AuthorsLianne Schmaal21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Melbourne)
Abstract Major depressive disorder (MDD) often emerges during adolescence with detrimental effects on development as well as lifetime consequences. Identifying neurobiological markers that are associated with the onset or course of this disorder in childhood and adolescence is important for early recognition and intervention and, potentially, for the prevention of illness onset. In this systematic review, 68 longitudinal neuroimaging studies, from 34 unique samples, that examined the association...
Published on Sep 16, 2019in Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports
Abigail Oliver ('KCL': King's College London), Victoria Pile4
Estimated H-index: 4
('KCL': King's College London)
+ 1 AuthorsJennifer Y. F. Lau31
Estimated H-index: 31
('KCL': King's College London)
Purpose of Review Adolescent depression is a major public health concern associated with severe outcomes. A lack of efficacious interventions has triggered an increase in cognitive neuropsychology research to identify relevant treatment targets for new interventions. This review summarises key neurocognitive findings in adolescent depression and explores the potential of neurocognitive markers as treatment targets in new interventions.
Published on Sep 12, 2019in Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry6.13
Jingwen Jin (SBU: Stony Brook University), Jared Van Snellenberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 4 AuthorsAprajita Mohanty19
Estimated H-index: 19
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Roselinde H. Kaiser11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Elena Peterson + 7 AuthorsDiego A. Pizzagalli57
Estimated H-index: 57
Abstract Background Adolescence is a developmental period in which depression and related mood syndromes often emerge, but few objective markers exist to guide diagnosis or predict symptoms. One potential mood marker is the functioning of frontoinsular networks, which undergo substantial development in adolescence and have been implicated in adult depression. To test this hypothesis, we used task-based neuroimaging to evaluate whether frontoinsular network dysfunction was linked to current and p...
Published on Apr 3, 2019in Psychophysiology3.38
Lauren Delaparte4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Elizabeth Bartlett2
Estimated H-index: 2
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 5 AuthorsRoman Kotov36
Estimated H-index: 36
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Published on May 22, 2018in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience2.87
Xuejuan Yang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Ministry of Education),
Ming Gao2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Fourth Military Medical University)
+ 6 AuthorsWei Qin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Ministry of Education)
Lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE) is a common male sexual dysfunction. Lack of active control for rapid ejaculation brought great distress to sexual harmony, and even fertility. Previous neurophysiology studies revealed an ejaculation-related control mechanism in the brain. However, it remains unclear whether this inhibitory network is altered in LPE patients. The present study investigated the central inhibitory network function of LPE patients by using stop signal task-related functional ma...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Birth defects research
Scott A. Jones3
Estimated H-index: 3
(OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University),
Angelica M. Morales8
Estimated H-index: 8
(OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)
+ 1 AuthorsBonnie J. Nagel33
Estimated H-index: 33
(OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)