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Diverse feather shape evolution enabled by coupling anisotropic signalling modules with self-organizing branching programme

Published on Apr 1, 2017in Nature Communications11.88
· DOI :10.1038/ncomms14139
Ang Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Seth Figueroa2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 4 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
Cite
Abstract
Asymmetric feather vane shape was a critical innovation in feather evolution and adaptation for flight. Here, Li and colleagues characterize the multi-module regulatory network that controls feather vane shape and underlies feather diversification.
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  • References (42)
  • Citations (12)
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References42
Newest
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Developmental Dynamics2.85
Ang Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
(SC: University of Southern California),
Yung-Chih Lai5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SC: University of Southern California)
+ 5 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
(SC: University of Southern California)
Background: How tissue patterns form in development and regeneration is a fundamental issue remaining to be fully understood. The integument often forms repetitive units in space (periodic patterning) and time (cyclic renewal), such as feathers and hairs. Integument patterns are visible and experimentally manipulatable, helping us reveal pattern formative processes. Variability is seen in regional phenotypic specificities and temporal cycling at different physiological stages. Results: Here we s...
Published on Feb 11, 2015
Teresa J. Feo8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Yale University),
Daniel J. Field13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Yale University),
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Yale University)
The geometry of feather barbs (barb length and barb angle) determines feather vane asymmetry and vane rigidity, which are both critical to a feather's aerodynamic performance. Here, we describe the relationship between barb geometry and aerodynamic function across the evolutionary history of asymmetrical flight feathers, from Mesozoic taxa outside of modern avian diversity (Microraptor, Archaeopteryx, Sapeornis, Confuciusornis and the enantiornithine Eopengornis) to an extensive sample of modern...
Published on Feb 16, 2015in Annual Review of Animal Biosciences5.20
Chih-Feng Chen15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NCHU: National Chung Hsing University),
John Foley19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 5 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
(SC: University of Southern California)
The feather is a complex ectodermal organ with hierarchical branching patterns. It provides functions in endothermy, communication, and flight. Studies of feather growth, cycling, and health are of fundamental importance to avian biology and poultry science. In addition, feathers are an excellent model for morphogenesis studies because of their accessibility, and their distinct patterns can be used to assay the roles of specific molecular pathways. Here we review the progress in aspects of devel...
Published on Dec 12, 2014in Science41.04
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsDavid J. Varricchio28
Estimated H-index: 28
(MSU: Montana State University)
Research on the origin and evolution of birds has gathered pace in recent years, aided by a continuous stream of new fossil finds as well as molecular phylogenies. Bird origins, in particular, are now better understood than those of mammals, for which the early fossil record is relatively poor compared with that of birds. Xu et al. review progress in tracing the origins of birds from theropod dinosaurs, focusing especially on recent fossil finds of feathered dinosaurs of northeastern China. They...
Published on Jun 1, 2014in Journal of Experimental Zoology1.72
Teresa J. Feo8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Yale University),
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Yale University)
Asymmetry in flight feather vane width is a major functional innovation associated with the evolutionof flightintheancestorsofbirds.However,thedevelopmentalandmorphologicalbasisof feathershapeisnotsimple, andthedevelopmental processesinvolved invanewidthasymmetry are poorly understood. We present a theoretical model of feather morphology and development that describes the possible ways to modify feather development and produce vane asymmetry. Our model finds that the theoretical morphospace of f...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Nature Communications11.88
Gareth J. Dyke28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Southampton),
Roeland de Kat12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 3 AuthorsBharathram Ganapathisubramani23
Estimated H-index: 23
Some early flying dinosaurs, such as the Early Creataceous Microraptor, possessed four wings, but their aerodynamic performance is poorly understood. Dyke et al. show that Microraptor did not require sophisticated wing morphology to undertake effective glides, supporting the view that the origin of feathers in dinosaurs is not associated with flight.
Published on May 15, 2013in Development5.76
Rushikesh Sheth8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Damien Grégoire3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 6 AuthorsMarie Kmita20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UdeM: Université de Montréal)
Limb development relies on an exquisite coordination between growth and patterning, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Anterior-posterior and proximal-distal specification initiates in early limb bud concomitantly with the proliferative expansion of limb cells. Previous studies have shown that limb bud growth initially relies on fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) produced in the apical ectodermal ridge (AER-FGFs), the maintenance of which relies on a positive-feedback loop involving son...
Published on Apr 25, 2013in PLOS Genetics5.22
Henner F. Farin19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Hochschule Hannover),
Timo H.-W. Lüdtke8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Hochschule Hannover)
+ 5 AuthorsAndreas Kispert63
Estimated H-index: 63
(Hochschule Hannover)
Vertebrate limb outgrowth is driven by a positive feedback loop that involves Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Gremlin1 (Grem1) in the posterior limb bud mesenchyme and Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) in the overlying epithelium. Proper spatio-temporal control of these signaling activities is required to avoid limb malformations such as polydactyly. Here we show that, in Tbx2-deficient hindlimbs, Shh/Fgf4 signaling is prolonged, resulting in increased limb bud size and duplication of digit 4. In turn, ...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Developmental Biology2.94
Zhicao Yue10
Estimated H-index: 10
(SC: University of Southern California),
Ting Xin Jiang17
Estimated H-index: 17
(SC: University of Southern California)
+ 2 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
(SC: University of Southern California)
In a feather, there are distinct morphologies along the proximal–distal axis. The proximal part is a cylindrical stalk (calamus), whereas the distal part has barb and barbule branches. Here we focus on what molecular signaling activity can modulate feather stem cells to generate these distinct morphologies. We demonstrate the drastic tissue remodeling during feather cycling which includes initiation, growth and resting phases. In the growth phase, epithelial components undergo progressive change...
Published on Jul 19, 2012in PLOS Genetics5.22
Chen Siang Ng9
Estimated H-index: 9
(AS: Academia Sinica),
Ping Wu23
Estimated H-index: 23
(SC: University of Southern California)
+ 13 AuthorsChih Feng Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NCHU: National Chung Hsing University)
Feathers have complex forms and are an excellent model to study the development and evolution of morphologies. Existing chicken feather mutants are especially useful for identifying genetic determinants of feather formation. This study focused on the gene F, underlying the frizzle feather trait that has a characteristic curled feather rachis and barbs in domestic chickens. Our developmental biology studies identified defects in feather medulla formation, and physical studies revealed that the fr...
Cited By12
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Trends in Ecology and Evolution15.24
Michael J. Benton66
Estimated H-index: 66
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Danielle Dhouailly25
Estimated H-index: 25
+ 1 AuthorsMaria E. McNamara12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UCC: University College Cork)
Feathers have long been regarded as the innovation that drove the success of birds. However, feathers have been reported from close dinosaurian relatives of birds, and now from ornithischian dinosaurs and pterosaurs, the cousins of dinosaurs. Incomplete preservation makes these reports controversial. If true, these findings shift the origin of feathers back 80 million years before the origin of birds. Gene regulatory networks show the deep homology of scales, feathers, and hairs. Hair and feathe...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Experimental Dermatology2.87
Dong-Won Kim4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Johns Hopkins University),
Luis A. Garza9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Johns Hopkins University)
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications11.88
Dongyang Cheng1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FZU: Fuzhou University),
Xiaoli Yan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FZU: Fuzhou University)
+ 11 AuthorsWanzhong He1
Estimated H-index: 1
Branching morphogenesis is a general mechanism that increases the surface area of an organ. In chicken feathers, the flat epithelial sheath at the base of the follicle is transformed into periodic branches. How exactly the keratinocytes are organized into this pattern remains unclear. Here we show that in the feather follicle, the pre-branch basal keratinocytes have extensive filopodia, which contract and smooth out after branching. Manipulating the filopodia via small GTPases RhoA/Cdc42 also re...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Genomics3.50
Jingyang24
Estimated H-index: 24
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Yanhua Qu18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsFumin Lei31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Background Feathers with complex and fine structure are hallmark avian integument appendages, which have contributed significantly to the survival and breeding for birds. Here, we aimed to explore the differentiation, morphogenesis and development of diverse feathers in the domestic duck.
Published on Dec 1, 2018
Mao Kondo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Tohoku University),
Tomoe Sekine (Tohoku University)+ 5 AuthorsKoji Tamura34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Tohoku University)
Flight feathers, a type of feather that is unique to extant/extinct birds and some non-avian dinosaurs, are the most evolutionally advanced type of feather. In general, feather types are formed in the second or later generation of feathers at the first and following molting, and the first molting begins at around two weeks post hatching in chicken. However, it has been stated in some previous reports that the first molting from the natal down feathers to the flight feathers is much earlier than ...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Genome Biology and Evolution3.73
Chen Siang Ng9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NTHU: National Tsing Hua University),
Wen-Hsiung Li94
Estimated H-index: 94
(U of C: University of Chicago)
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Anatomical Science International1.57
Lorenzo Alibardi27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UNIBO: University of Bologna)
The molting cycle of feathers includes an anagen (growth) stage, a likely catagen stage where the feather follicles degenerate, and a resting stage where fully grown feathers remain in their follicles and are functional before molting. However, the cytological changes involved in the resting and molting stages are poorly known, so the results of an ultrastructural analysis of these processes in adult chick feathers are presented here. The study showed that the dermal papilla shrinks, and numerou...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Development5.76
Jianqiong Lin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FZU: Fuzhou University),
Zhicao Yue1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FZU: Fuzhou University)
ABSTRACT Sensing a global directional cue to orient cell growth is crucial in tissue morphogenesis. An anterior-posterior gradient of Wnt signaling controls the helical growth of feather branches (barbs), and thus the formation of bilateral feathers. However, it remains unclear how the keratinocytes sense this gradient and orient barb growth. Here, we show that in chicken, owing to feather branching, the global Wnt gradient is subdivided into periodic barbs. Within each barb, the anterior barbul...
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