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Social media and loneliness

Published on Sep 1, 2016in Computers in Human Behavior 4.31
· DOI :10.1016/j.chb.2016.03.084
Matthew Pittman5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UO: University of Oregon),
Brandon Reich3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UO: University of Oregon)
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Abstract
Social media use continues to grow and is especially prevalent among young adults. It is surprising then that, in spite of this enhanced interconnectivity, young adults may be lonelier than other age groups, and that the current generation may be the loneliest ever. We propose that only image-based platforms (e.g., Instagram, Snapchat) have the potential to ameliorate loneliness due to the enhanced intimacy they offer. In contrast, text-based platforms (e.g., Twitter, Yik Yak) offer little intimacy and should have no effect on loneliness. This study (Nź=ź253) uses a mixed-design survey to test this possibility. Quantitative results suggest that loneliness may decrease, while happiness and satisfaction with life may increase, as a function of image-based social media use. In contrast, text-based media use appears ineffectual. Qualitative results suggest that the observed effects may be due to the enhanced intimacy offered by image-based (versus text-based) social media use. Loneliness remains pervasive in societies where social media usage is highest.Interconnectedness offered by social media usage should attenuate loneliness.Image-based social media may attenuate loneliness due to increased social presence.We examine psychological well-being of a sample of young adult social media users.Only image-based social media usage attenuates loneliness in a linear pattern.
  • References (60)
  • Citations (84)
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References60
Newest
Published on Nov 11, 2016
Shannon Greenwood1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Andrew Perrin2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Maeve Duggan8
Estimated H-index: 8
Over the past decade, Pew Research Center has documented the wide variety of ways in which Americans use social media to seek out information and interact with others. A majority of Americans now say they get news via social media, and half of the public has turned to these sites to learn about the 2016 presidential election. Americans are using social media in the context of work (whether to take a mental break on the job or to seek out employment), while also engaging in an ongoing effort to n...
372 Citations
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Communication Research 3.09
Brendan R. Watson8
Estimated H-index: 8
This study compares Gulf Coast journalists and Twitter users’ coverage of the BP oil spill. In addition to examining authors’ attitudes toward and coverage of the BP oil spill, the study examines community-level variables that shaped attitudes and coverage. The community structure literature has suggested that news media in smaller, more homogeneous communities, which are economically dependent on a polluting industry (as are many communities along the Gulf Coast), are more reticent to be critic...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Telematics and Informatics 3.71
Aqdas Malik4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Aalto University),
Amandeep Dhir13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Aalto University),
Marko Nieminen10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Aalto University)
Applying Uses and Gratification theory, the current study examines gratifications for sharing photos on Facebook.An online survey completed by 368 respondents identified six gratifications.Affection, attention seeking, disclosure, information sharing, habit, and social influence are identified.Age was in positive correlation with disclosure and social influence gratifications.Gender differences are identified in habit and disclosure gratifications.Number of photos shared are negatively correlate...
81 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 20, 2015in Social media and society
Matthew Pittman5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UO: University of Oregon)
This study explores the relationship between social media attitudes and behaviors and loneliness among college students. The study looks at the interaction of loneliness with three popular social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram), as well as how often those students create and/or consume content within each platform. A survey administered to 432 undergraduates at two universities in the Pacific Northwest identified a significant relationship between social media attitudes and be...
8 Citations
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Computers in Human Behavior 4.31
Yang Yu8
Estimated H-index: 8
(RIT: Rochester Institute of Technology),
Xiao Wang10
Estimated H-index: 10
(RIT: Rochester Institute of Technology)
We used a big data approach to analyze U.S. soccer fans' sentiments in their tweets.Tweets were used to express joy and anticipation and to express emotions.U.S. fans' fear and anger were common and reflected U.S. team's goals or losses.Emotions in two non-U.S. games were unclear.This paper provides support for disposition theory of sport and sentiment analysis. The present project collected real-time tweets from U.S. soccer fans during five 2014 FIFA World Cup games (three games between the U.S...
58 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 25, 2015in First Monday
Matthew Pittman5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UO: University of Oregon),
Alec C. Tefertiller1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UO: University of Oregon)
Social networking services like Twitter have changed the way people engage with traditional broadcast media. But how social is “second screen” activity? The purpose of this study is to determine if patterns of connected viewing (augmenting television consumption with a second screen) and co-viewing (watching television together) are different for traditionally broadcast, “appointment” television shows versus streaming, asynchronous television releases. This study explores this phenomena of “co-c...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2015
Aaron Smith16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Kyley McGeeney1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Maeve Duggan8
Estimated H-index: 8
Key Themes of This Report 10% of Americans own a smartphone but do not have broadband at home, and 15% own a smartphone but say that they have a limited number of options for going online other than their cell phone. Those with relatively low income and educational attainment levels, younger adults, and non-whites are especially likely to be “smartphone-dependent.” Smartphones are widely used for navigating numerous important life activities, from researching a health condition to accessing educ...
138 Citations
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Perspectives on Psychological Science 8.19
Julianne Holt-Lunstad22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Timothy B. Smith21
Estimated H-index: 21
(BYU: Brigham Young University)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid Stephenson1
Estimated H-index: 1
Actual and perceived social isolation are both associated with increased risk for early mortality. In this meta-analytic review, our objective is to establish the overall and relative magnitude of social isolation and loneliness and to examine possible moderators. We conducted a literature search of studies (January 1980 to February 2014) using MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Social Work Abstracts, and Google Scholar. The included studies provided quantitative data on mortality as affected by lonelin...
533 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Richard Basilisco1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Kyung Jin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Kangwon National University)
Facebook is considered as the leading social network that has attracted millions of users across countries. However, the motivations for using Facebook may differ with each country. This study is an attempt to examine the motives that motivates Filipinos to use Facebook and the impact of their usage to their social capital and life satisfaction. The findings of the study suggest a significant degree on the identified motivations of seeking friends, entertainment, information, and convenience, so...
10 Citations
Cited By84
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2020
Malinda Desjarlais5
Estimated H-index: 5
(MRU: Mount Royal University)
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Published on Apr 5, 2019in BMC Psychology
Tasuku Igarashi8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Nagoya University)
Background Loneliness is a major risk factor for mental and physical health worldwide. The Three-Item Loneliness Scale (TIL Scale; Hughes et al., 2004) has been widely applied to measure loneliness in a simplified format, but no validated Japanese version has been developed. This study adapted the TIL Scale into Japanese and tested its reliability and validity.
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Published on May 1, 2019in Computers in Human Behavior 4.31
Huanyou Chai , Geng-Feng Niu6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 2 AuthorsXiao-Jun Sun (CCNU: Central China Normal University)
Abstract Considering the popularity of social networking sites (SNSs) and the inconsistent results regarding the effect of SNS use on subjective well-being, this study intended to address the question “why SNS fails to predict subjective well-being” by investigating the suppressing role of social overload and moderating role of fear of missing out (FoMO). A sample of 1319 Chinese adolescents was recruited to complete measures on SNS use, social overload, FoMO and subjective well-being. Results s...
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Published on Dec 11, 2018
Annukka K. Lindell18
Estimated H-index: 18
(La Trobe University)
ABSTRACTIn social media’s attention economy “likes” are currency; photos showing faces attract more “likes.” Previous research has established a left cheek bias in photos uploaded to social media, but whether left cheek poses induce more engagement than right cheek poses remains to be determined. The present study thus examined whether pose orientation influences the number of “likes” and comments garnered by photos uploaded to Instagram. The top 20 single-user Instagram accounts were identified...
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Published on Feb 19, 2018in Information, Communication & Society 4.12
Elmira Djafarova4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Northumbria University),
Oxana Trofimenko2
Estimated H-index: 2
(RANEPA: Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration)
Companies increasingly use micro-celebrities for product endorsement. However, there are concerns around the self-presentation and credibility of this source of information online. This study examines the relationships between source credibility, self-presentation, and consumer behavior towards micro-celebrity endorsements. In-depth interviews were conducted with 38 female active users of Instagram, from Russia, to explore the impact of micro-celebrities’ credibility and self-presentation upon c...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2019in Journal of Youth and Adolescence 3.26
Anna Vannucci14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Christine McCauley Ohannessian20
Estimated H-index: 20
Despite the salience of the social media context to psychosocial development, little is known about social media use patterns and how they relate to psychological and social functioning over time during early adolescence. This longitudinal study, therefore, identified subgroups of early adolescents based on their social media use and examined whether these subgroups predicted psychosocial functioning. Adolescents (N = 1205; 11–14 years; 51% female; 51% white) completed surveys at baseline and a ...
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Published on Jul 15, 2019in JAMA Pediatrics 12.00
Elroy Boers (UdeM: Université de Montréal), Mohammad H. Afzali3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UdeM: Université de Montréal)
+ 1 AuthorsSherry H. Stewart Patricia J. Conrod Miche78
Estimated H-index: 78
(UdeM: Université de Montréal)
Importance Increases in screen time have been found to be associated with increases in depressive symptoms. However, longitudinal studies are lacking. Objective To repeatedly measure the association between screen time and depression to test 3 explanatory hypotheses: displacement, upward social comparison, and reinforcing spirals. Design, Setting, and Participants This secondary analysis used data from a randomized clinical trial assessing the 4-year efficacy of a personality-targeted drug and a...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 13, 2019
Holly Scott2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Glas.: University of Glasgow),
Heather Cleland Woods4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Glas.: University of Glasgow)
Purpose of Review Sleep and mental health researchers are increasingly recognising the need to update our approaches to understanding the unique social, emotional and cognitive aspects of social media use, rather than simply considering it as just another hour of total daily “screen time”. In this review, we highlight some recent developments in this area, discuss ongoing challenges facing this field and offer recommendations for future steps.
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