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Computers in Human Behavior
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Papers 6597
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#1Maya B. Mathur (Stanford University)H-Index: 10
#2David B. Reichling (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 32
Last.Brandy Bessette-Symons (Ithaca College)H-Index: 2
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Abstract Android robots that resemble humans closely, but not perfectly, can provoke negative feelings of dislike and eeriness in humans (the “Uncanny Valley” effect). We investigated whether category confusion between the perceptual categories of “robot” and “human” contributes to Uncanny Valley aversion. Using a novel, validated corpus of 182 images of real robot and human faces, we precisely estimated the shape of the Uncanny Valley and the location of the perceived robot/human boundary. To i...
#1Young-Jae Cha (SNU: Seoul National University)H-Index: 1
#2Sojung Baek (SNU: Seoul National University)H-Index: 1
Last.Dayk Jang (SNU: Seoul National University)H-Index: 2
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Human-machine intellectual comparisons increasingly threaten the distinctiveness of humans. Drawing on social identity theory, we assume that people will compensate for the loss of human distinctiveness in a given area by valuing “alternative” human attributes (i.e., social creativity strategy). A preliminary study found that the defeat of a human go champion by an artificial intelligence threatened the rationality and refinement of humanity (i.e., threatened dimensions). Studies 1–3 fo...
#1Yee Man Margaret Ng (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Abstract This study proposes a conceptual framework for innovation post-adoption behavior. The model emphasizes that innovation discontinuance is not the end of the innovation diffusion process but one of the stages. The post-adoption process is portrayed in a manner analogous to Rogers's innovation adoption process, but depending on the type of discontinuance—intermittent or permanent—the respective decision-making process could be quite different. For intermittent discontinuers, the movement t...
Abstract Research indicates that using social network sites as a source for news increases perceived knowledge even if, objectively, people fail to acquire knowledge. This might result from the frequent repetition of topics in news posts caused by multiple news outlets posting about the same news topics and the algorithm that favors similar postings. These repeated encounters can have a positive effect on the perception of knowing more, even if actual learning hardly occurs. An experiment (N = 8...
#1Yueli Zheng (CCNU: Central China Normal University)
#2Xiu-Juan Yang (CCNU: Central China Normal University)H-Index: 3
Last.Zong-Kui Zhou (CCNU: Central China Normal University)
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Abstract Although perceived stress has been shown to be related to online compulsive buying among women, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this association. The present study examined the mediating role of negative coping and the moderating role of self-esteem in the association between perceived stress and online compulsive buying. A sample of 548 female consumers (M age = 21.41 years, SD = 4.40) completed questionnaire measures of perceived stress, self-esteem, negative coping...
#1Xun Zhu (UND: University of North Dakota)
#2Youllee Kim (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 1
Last.Haseon Park (UND: University of North Dakota)
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Abstract Research examining the information diffusion on social media focused on the size of diffusion but has largely missed the speed by which information spreads over time. To fill this void, this study explores what intrinsic message characteristics drive information not only to reach many people but also to spread fast across social networks. Using a computational social science approach, this study collected all the original tweets from the official Twitter account of the Centers for Disea...
#1Lutz WartbergH-Index: 9
#2Levente Kriston (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 28
Last.Rainer Thomasius (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 19
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Abstract Background Problematic use of computer games was incorporated in the DSM-5 (so-called Internet Gaming Disorder, IGD) and the ICD-11. Knowledge on problematic social media use (PSMU) is scarcer. This is the first study that investigates both IGD and PSMU in a representative sample. Methods A sample of 1001 German 12- to 17-year olds (483 girls, 518 boys) was surveyed on IGD, PSMU, depressive symptoms and further psychosocial aspects (standardized questionnaires: IGDS, SMDS, DesTeen, KUSI...
Abstract The present study examined the underlying mechanism of self-presentation on emerging social networking sites (SNSs) where features facilitating simulation of real-life communication are plenty. Although previous scholars have examined self-presentation on social media, very few have investigated the combined influences of extrinsic media features and intrinsic personality trait in orchestrating self-presentation on Instagram, a platform that is highly popular among young adults. Specifi...
#1Lara N. Wolfersa (University of Hohenheim)
#2Sophie Kitzmannb (University of Hohenheim)
Last.Nina Sommerb (University of Hohenheim)
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Abstract Smartphone use has become an “always-on” activity. Caring for children and being sensitive to their needs seems to conflict with this immersive and time-consuming activity. Building on John Bowlby’s Attachment Theory, we focused on how mothers' smartphone use is related to maternal sensitivity. Using the Mini-Maternal Behavior Q-Sort method and a post-observation questionnaire, we collected data from 89 mother-child dyads on playgrounds. Our results showed that mothers who used their sm...
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