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Effect of the volume and intensity of exercise training on insulin sensitivity

Published on Jan 1, 2004in Journal of Applied Physiology3.14
· DOI :10.1152/japplphysiol.00707.2003
Joseph A. Houmard57
Estimated H-index: 57
,
Charles J. Tanner26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 3 AuthorsWilliam E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
Cite
Abstract
Physical activity enhances insulin action in obese/overweight individuals. However, the exercise prescription required for the optimal enhancement is not known. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training consisting of vigorous-intensity activity would enhance insulin sensitivity more substantially than moderate-intensity activity. Sedentary, overweight/obese subjects (n = 154) were randomly assigned to either control or an exercise group for 6 mo: 1) low-volume/moderate-intensity group [∼12 miles walking/wk at 40–55% peak O2 consumption (Vo2 peak)], 2) low-volume/high-intensity group (∼12 miles jogging/wk at 65–80% Vo2 peak), and 3) high-volume/high-intensity group (∼20 miles jogging/wk at 65–80% Vo2 peak). Training volume (miles/wk) was achieved by exercising ∼115 min/wk (low-volume/high-intensity group) or ∼170 min/wk (low-volume/moderate-intensity and high-volume/high-intensity groups). Insulin action was measured with an insulin sensitivity index (SI) from an intrav...
  • References (28)
  • Citations (389)
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References28
Newest
Published on Nov 7, 2002in The New England Journal of Medicine70.67
William E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
,
Joseph A. Houmard57
Estimated H-index: 57
+ 9 AuthorsCris A. Slentz35
Estimated H-index: 35
Background Increased physical activity is related to reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, possibly because it leads to improvement in the lipoprotein profile. However, the amount of exercise training required for optimal benefit is unknown. In a prospective, randomized study, we investigated the effects of the amount and intensity of exercise on lipoproteins. Methods A total of 111 sedentary, overweight men and women with mild-to-moderate dyslipidemia were randomly assigned to participate for...
Published on Aug 1, 2002in Journal of Applied Physiology3.14
Erik J. Henriksen43
Estimated H-index: 43
Insulin resistance of skeletal muscle glucose transport is a key defect in the development of impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes. It is well established that both an acute bout of exercise and chronic endurance exercise training can have beneficial effects on insulin action in insulin-resistant states. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding these effects in the obese Zucker rat, a widely used rodent model of obesity-associated insulin resistance, and in insul...
Published on Aug 1, 2002in International Journal of Obesity4.51
Jørn Wulff Helge39
Estimated H-index: 39
Prolonged adaptation to fat-rich diet and training; effects on body fat stores and insulin resistance in man
Published on Oct 1, 2001in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise4.48
William E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
,
Carol E. Torgan7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 8 AuthorsJoseph A. Houmard57
Estimated H-index: 57
KRAUS, W. E., C. E. TORGAN, B. D. DUSCHA, J. NORRIS, S. A. BROWN, F. R. COBB, C. W. BALES, B. H. ANNEX, G. P. SAMSA, J. A. HOUMARD, and C. A. SLENTZ. Studies of a targeted risk reduction intervention through defined exercise (STRRIDE). Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 33, No. 10, 2001, pp. 1774–1784. P
Published on Mar 4, 1998in JAMA51.27
Elizabeth J. Mayer-Davis65
Estimated H-index: 65
,
Ralph B. D'Agostino189
Estimated H-index: 189
(Wake Forest University)
+ 4 AuthorsRichard N. Bergman103
Estimated H-index: 103
(SC: University of Southern California)
Context.—Exercise training is associated with improved insulin sensitivity (SI), but the potential impact of habitual, nonvigorous activity is uncertain.Objective.—To determine whether habitual, nonvigorous physical activity, as well as vigorous and overall activity, is associated with better SI.Design.—A multicultural epidemiologic study.Setting.—The Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study, conducted in Oakland, Calif; Los Angeles, Calif; the San Luis Valley, Colo; and San Antonio, Tex.Partici...
Published on Feb 1, 1998in Annual Review of Medicine10.09
Laurie J. Goodyear79
Estimated H-index: 79
,
Barbara B. Kahn109
Estimated H-index: 109
Physical exercise can be an important adjunct in the treatment of both non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Over the past several years, considerable progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis for these clinically important effects of physical exercise. Similarly to insulin, a single bout of exercise increases the rate of glucose uptake into the contracting skeletal muscles, a process that is regulated by the translocation of GLUT4 glu...
Published on Jul 1, 1996in Journal of Applied Physiology3.14
Donald R. Dengel37
Estimated H-index: 37
,
Richard E. Pratley17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 2 AuthorsAndrew P. Goldberg60
Estimated H-index: 60
The decline in glucose homeostasis with aging may be due to the physical deconditioning and obesity that often develop with aging. The independent and combined effects of aerobic exercise training (AEX) and weight loss (WL) on glucose metabolism were studied in 47 nondiabetic sedentary older men. There were 14 men in a weekly behavioral modification/WL program, 10 in a 3 times/wk AEX program, 14 in an AEX+WL program, and 9 in the control (Con) group. The 10-mo intervention increased maximal oxyg...
Published on Apr 1, 1996in Diabetes Care15.27
Jie Kang38
Estimated H-index: 38
,
Robert Robertson41
Estimated H-index: 41
+ 5 AuthorsAlan C. Utter37
Estimated H-index: 37
OBJECTIVE The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the acute effect of exercise of differing intensity on plasma glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Six obese men and six obese men with NIDDM of similar age, weight, percentage body fat, and Vo 2peak participated in the study. Each subject underwent two 7-day exercise programs in a counterbalanced order at 2-week intervals. During each 7-day exercise period, the subjects cycled every da...
Published on Jan 1, 1996in JAMA51.27
Russell V. Luepker74
Estimated H-index: 74
,
Suzanne Bennett Johnson33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 10 AuthorsP. E. McBride1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Cited By389
Newest
Published on Sep 16, 2019in Nutrients4.17
There is a wealth of research lauding the benefits of exercise to oppose cardiometabolic disease such as diabetes, CVD and hypertension. However, in the great majority of these studies, the nutritional context (energy balance, deficit, or surplus) has been ignored, despite its profound effect on responses to both exercise and inactivity. Even a minor energy deficit or surplus can strongly modulate the magnitude and duration of the metabolic responses to an intervention; therefore, failure to acc...
Published on Sep 9, 2019in Physiotherapy Research International
Daniela Bassi‐Dibai , Almir Vieira Dibai-Filho8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UFMA: Federal University of Maranhão)
+ 5 AuthorsAudrey Borghi-Silva23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UFSCar: Federal University of São Carlos)
Published on 2019in Frontiers in Physiology3.20
Dominique D. Gagnon (Laurentian University), Sandra C. Dorman4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Northern Ontario School of Medicine)
+ 4 AuthorsKarl-Heinz Herzig46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Oulu)
Background: Oxidative stress results in lipid, protein and DNA oxidation, resulting in telomere erosion, chromosomal damage, and accelerated cellular aging. Training promotes healthy metabolic and oxidative profiles whereas the effects of multi-day, prolonged and continuous exercise, are unknown. This study investigated the effects of multi-day prolonged exercise on metabolic and oxidative stress as well as telomere integrity in healthy adults. Methods: Fifteen participants performed a 14-day, 2...
Published on Mar 16, 2019in British Journal of Sports Medicine11.64
Martin Bæk Blond1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Mads Rosenkilde11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 4 AuthorsBente Stallknecht34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Objectives To evaluate effects of active bike commuting or leisure-time exercise of two intensities on peripheral insulin sensitivity (primary outcome), cardiorespiratory fitness and intra-abdominal adipose tissue mass (secondary outcomes). Methods 188 physically inactive, healthy women and men (20-45 years) with overweight or class 1 obesity were recruited. In the 6-month trial, 130 participants were randomised to either: no intervention (CON), active commuting (BIKE) or leisure-time exercise o...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Science & Sports0.68
G. Marinari (University of Montpellier), C. Espitalier-Rivière (ICM Partners)+ 3 AuthorsJ.-F. Brun24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Montpellier)
Resume Introduction et objectif Selon le Centre international de recherche sur le cancer (CIRC) on peut estimer que dans l’Union Europeenne, 13 000 cas de cancer du sein (CDS) pourraient etre evites annuellement par un maintien a la normale du poids corporel. Cette revue a pour objectif d’analyser la relation entre l’Activite physique (AP) et le CDS, cette derniere etant une maladie associee au surpoids et a l’obesite. Actualite L’AP est impliquee dans la relation liant le surpoids et l’obesite ...
Published on Aug 29, 2019in International Journal of Obesity4.51
Timo Kern2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Martin Bæk Blond1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
+ 6 AuthorsBente Stallknecht34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Studies suggest that exercise affects the composition and function of the human gut microbiota, yet this has not been investigated in a randomized controlled trial. The primary aim of this study was to assess if exercise alters the diversity, composition and functional potential of the gut microbiota in free-living humans. A secondary aim was to test whether alpha diversity was associated with phenotypical outcomes. Eighty eight participants with overweight or obesity completed a 6-month randomi...
Published on May 11, 2019in European Journal of Applied Physiology3.06
Todd Castleberry1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Todd Castleberry (TCU: Texas Christian University)+ 5 AuthorsVic Ben-Ezra6
Estimated H-index: 6
Purpose It is reported that a single bout of exercise can lower insulin responses 12–24 h post-exercise; however, the insulin responses to alternate or consecutive bouts of exercise is unknown. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise pattern on post-exercise insulin and glucose responses following a glucose challenge.
Published on May 7, 2019in PLOS ONE2.78
Saima Afaq7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Khyber Medical University),
Angad S. Kooner (Hillingdon Hospital)+ 2 AuthorsJohn Chambers88
Estimated H-index: 88
Background Insulin resistance and related metabolic disturbances are major risk factors for the higher T2D risk and associated morbidity and mortality amongst South Asians. The contribution of physical activity to the increased prevalence of insulin resistance and related disturbances amongst South Asians is unknown. Methods We recruited 902 South Asian and European men and women, aged 35–85 years from the ongoing LOLIPOP study. Clinical characterisation comprised standardised questionnaire and ...
Published on May 1, 2019in Diabetes & Metabolism4.01
Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCLM: University of Castilla–La Mancha),
Juan F. Ortega11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UCLM: University of Castilla–La Mancha)
+ 2 AuthorsFelix Morales-Palomo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCLM: University of Castilla–La Mancha)
Abstract Aim To determine whether exercise training improves insulin actions through concomitant body weight loss (BWL). Methods Subjects (aged 55 ± 8 years) with metabolic syndrome (MetS), prediabetes (fasting blood glucose: 111 ± 2 mg·dL −1 , HbA1c: 5.85 ± 0.05%) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference: 104 ± 7.9 cm) were randomly allocated to either a group performing aerobic interval training (EXER; n = 76) or a sedentary group receiving lifestyle counselling (CONT; n = 20) for 16 weeks. ...
Published on Apr 16, 2019in Frontiers in Physiology3.20
Johanna L. Johnson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Duke University),
Cris A. Slentz35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Duke University)
+ 2 AuthorsWilliam E. Kraus76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Duke University)
Background: STRRIDE (Studies Targeting Risk Reduction Interventions through Defined Exercise) was an eight-month exercise study conducted from 1998-2003. Subjects were randomized to control or one of three exercise groups differing in intensity and amount. To determine if there were legacy effects, we invited 161 individuals who completed the intervention phase to return for a 10-year Reunion study. Methods: Subjects completed medical history and physical activity questionnaires. Height, body we...
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