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Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by biocontrol yeasts

Published on Sep 1, 2019in Food Microbiology 4.09
· DOI :10.1016/j.fm.2019.01.008
Rosaria Contarino (University of Catania), Selina Brighina2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Catania)
+ 3 AuthorsCristina Restuccia21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Catania)
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Abstract
Abstract The Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by biocontrol yeast strains which belong to the Wickerhamomyces anomalus , Metschnikowia pulcherrima , Aureobasidium pullulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae species were identified by solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Alcohols (ethyl alcohol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and phenylethyl alcohol) and esters (ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate) were found to be the main VOCs emitted by the yeast strains, which had different production rate over a 16-day period. In addition, the tested yeast strains showed a remarkable ability to consume oxygen and to produce high percentages of carbon dioxide over a 5 days incubation period in a model system. The yeast strains, which were proven to very efficiently suppress in vivo the growth of postharvest fungal by VOCs, also quickly produced high percentages of ethyl acetate and carbon dioxide. . For all these reasons, we believe that the level of yeast biocontrol efficacy through the production of volatiles could be the result of a synergistic effect between VOCs and carbon dioxide in the packaging environment.
  • References (29)
  • Citations (1)
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References29
Newest
Published on May 1, 2017in Microbial Ecology 3.61
Lucia Parafati4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Catania),
G. Cirvilleri13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Catania)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael Wisniewski51
Estimated H-index: 51
(USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)
The use of yeasts, including Wickerhamomyces anomalus, as biocontrol agents of fungi responsible for postharvest diseases of fruits and vegetables has been investigated for the past two decades. Among a variety of mechanisms, the production of glucanases coded by the “killer genes” WaEXG1 and WaEXG2 have been reported to play a role in the ability of yeast to inhibit other fungi. The objective of the present study was to determine the expression of these genes by RT-qPCR, utilizing gene-specific...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Food Microbiology 4.09
Lucia Parafati4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Catania),
Alessandro Vitale23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Catania)
+ 1 AuthorsG. Cirvilleri13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Catania)
Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Aureobasidium pullulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts were tested for their ability to survive and synthesize antifungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both in vitro and in vivo conditions when immobilized on commercial hydrogel spheres. The results showed a good survival of all yeasts on hydrogel spheres up to 10 days of incubation. Moreover, VOCs produced in vitro by tested yeasts inhibited Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium digitatum an...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Food Microbiology 4.09
Monika Grzegorczyk1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences),
Barbara Żarowska8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsG. Cirvilleri13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Catania)
Abstract The antagonistic effects of Debaryomyces hansenii KI2a, D. hansenii MI1a and Wickerhamomyces anomalus BS91 were tested against Monilinia fructigena and Monilinia fructicola in in vitro and in vivo trials. All yeast strains demonstrated antifungal activity at different levels depending on species, strain and pathogen. D hansenii KI2a and W. anomalus BS91 showed the highest biocontrol activity in vitro ; the production of hydrolytic enzymes, killer toxins and volatile organic compounds (V...
23 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Food Microbiology 4.09
Lucia Parafati4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Catania),
Alessandro Vitale23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Catania)
+ 1 AuthorsG. Cirvilleri13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Catania)
Abstract Strains belonging to Wickerhamomyces anomalus , Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans species were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic molds Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum . Moreover, studies aimed at screening the antifungal activity of selected yeast strains in vivo conditions against P. digitatum and P. italicum , and investigated the efficacy of a polysaccharidic matrix, locust bean gum (LBG), enriched with ...
23 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Trends in Food Science and Technology 8.52
D. Spadaro25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UNITO: University of Turin),
Samir Droby47
Estimated H-index: 47
Abstracts Background Impressive progress was made in the last decade in development, registration and commercialization of biocontrol products based on yeast to manage postharvest pathogens of fruit. To successfully inhibit the pathogen infection and development, several possible mechanisms operate in a tritrophic host-pathogen-antagonist interaction system. Scope and Approach The current reviews focuses on the recent knowledge on the mechanisms by which yeast biocontrol agents (BCAs) interact w...
101 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2015in The ISME Journal 9.49
Ruth Schmidt7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Viviane Cordovez6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 2 AuthorsPaolina Garbeva22
Estimated H-index: 22
Microorganisms are important factors in shaping our environment. One key characteristic that has been neglected for a long time is the ability of microorganisms to release chemically diverse volatile compounds. At present, it is clear that the blend of volatiles released by microorganisms can be very complex and often includes many unknown compounds for which the chemical structures remain to be elucidated. The biggest challenge now is to unravel the biological and ecological functions of these ...
104 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 10, 2015
Serena Muccilli5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Cristina Restuccia21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Catania)
The yeasts constitute a large group of microorganisms characterized by the ability to grow and survive in different and stressful conditions and then to colonize a wide range of environmental and human ecosystems. The competitive traits against other microorganisms have attracted increasing attention from scientists, who proposed their successful application as bioprotective agents in the agricultural, food and medical sectors. These antagonistic activities rely on the competition for nutrients,...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2015in Food Microbiology 4.09
Lucia Parafati4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Catania),
Alessandro Vitale23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Catania)
+ 1 AuthorsG. Cirvilleri13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Catania)
Abstract Strains belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Wickerhamomyces anomalus , Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans , isolated from different food sources, were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic mold Botrytis cinerea . All yeast strains demonstrated antifungal activity at different levels depending on species and medium. Killer strains of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae showed the highest biocontrol in vitro activity, ...
87 Citations Source Cite
Huan-Chen Zhai4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Henan University of Technology),
Shuai-Bing Zhang5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Henan University of Technology)
+ 1 AuthorsJing-Ping Cai4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Henan University of Technology)
The growth of toxigenic fungi can adversely affect grain quality and even produce mycotoxins of food safety concern, which should be sensitively monitored and controlled during grain storage. To establish the relationship between the growth of toxigenic fungi and their carbon dioxide (CO2) production, the pattern of CO2 concentration changes was studied during the fungal growth in grain. The results showed the CO2 concentrations increased exponentially (r ≥ 0.96) during the growth of toxigenic f...
3 Citations Source Cite