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The application of repeated testing and monoexponential regressions to classify individual cardiorespiratory fitness responses to exercise training

Published on Apr 1, 2019in European Journal of Applied Physiology 3.06
· DOI :10.1007/s00421-019-04078-w
Jacob T. Bonafiglia5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Queen's University),
Robert Ross47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Queen's University),
Brendon J. Gurd25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Queen's University)
Cite
Abstract
Purpose We tested the hypothesis that monoexponential regressions will increase the certainty in response estimates and confidence in classification of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) responses compared to a recently proposed linear regression approach.
  • References (36)
  • Citations (1)
Cite
References36
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Physiological Reports
Jacob T. Bonafiglia5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Queen's University),
Matthew William Nelms2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Queen's University)
+ 6 AuthorsBrendon J. Gurd25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Queen's University)
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 3.46
James P. Raleigh3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Queen's University),
Matthew D. Giles3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Queen's University)
+ 9 AuthorsCraig A. Simpson6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Queen's University)
The current study examined the contribution of central and peripheral adaptations to changes in maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max) following sprint interval training (SIT). Twenty-three males completed four weekly SIT sessions (8 x 20 second cycling bouts at ~170% of work rate at VO 2 max, 10 second recovery) for four weeks. Following completion of training, the relationship between changes in VO 2 max and changes in central (cardiac output) and peripheral (a-vO 2 diff, muscle capillary density, o...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Journal of Applied Physiology 3.14
Anne Hecksteden10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Saarland University),
Werner Pitsch9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Saarland University)
+ 1 AuthorsTim Meyer26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Saarland University)
Observed response to regular exercise training differs widely between individuals even in tightly controlled research settings. However, the respective contributions of random error and true interindividual differences as well as the relative frequency of non-responders are disputed. Specific challenges of analyses on the individual level as well as a striking heterogeneity in definitions may partly explain these inconsistent results. Repeated testing during the training phase specifically addre...
Published on May 28, 2018in Frontiers in Nutrition
Paul Alan Swinton9
Estimated H-index: 9
(RMIT: RMIT University),
Benedict Stephens Hemingway1
Estimated H-index: 1
(RMIT: RMIT University)
+ 2 AuthorsEimear Dolan4
Estimated H-index: 4
(USP: University of São Paulo)
The concept of personalised nutrition and exercise prescription represents a topical and exciting progression for the discipline given the large inter-individual variability that exists in response to virtually all performance and health related interventions. Appropriate interpretation of intervention-based data from an individual or group of individuals requires practitioners and researchers to consider a range of concepts including the confounding influence of measurement error and biological...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in The Journal of Physiology
David Montero14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Carsten Lundby39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UZH: University of Zurich)
Key points The prevalence of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) non-response gradually declines in healthy individuals exercising 60, 120, 180, 240 or 300 min per week for 6 weeks. Following a successive identical 6-week training period but comprising 120 min of additional exercise per week, CRF non-response is universally abolished. The magnitude of CRF improvement is primarily attributed to changes in haemoglobin mass. The potential for CRF improvement may be present and unveiled with appropriate...
Published on Dec 13, 2016in Circulation 23.05
Robert Ross47
Estimated H-index: 47
,
Steven N. Blair140
Estimated H-index: 140
+ 13 AuthorsCarl J. Lavie82
Estimated H-index: 82
Mounting evidence has firmly established that low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and mortality rates attributable to various cancers. A growing body of epidemiological and clinical evidence demonstrates not only that CRF is a potentially stronger predictor of mortality than established risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but that the addition of CRF t...
Published on Dec 9, 2016in PLOS ONE 2.78
Jacob T. Bonafiglia5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Queen's University),
Mario P. Rotundo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Queen's University)
+ 3 AuthorsBrendon J. Gurd25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Queen's University)
The current study examined the adaptive response to both endurance (END) and sprint interval training (SIT) in a group of twenty-one recreationally active adults. All participants completed three weeks (four days/ week) of both END (30 minutes at ~65% VO2peak work rate (WR) and SIT (eight, 20-second intervals at ~170% VO2peak WR separated by 10 seconds of active rest) following a randomized crossover study design with a three-month washout period between training interventions. While a main effe...
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Sports Medicine 7.58
Philip Williamson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Teesside University),
Greg Atkinson55
Estimated H-index: 55
(Teesside University),
Alan M. Batterham37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Teesside University)
It has recently been reported how to quantify inter-individual differences in the response to an exercise intervention using the standard deviation of the change scores, as well as how to appraise these differences for clinical relevance. In a parallel-group randomised controlled trial, the key trigger for further investigation into inter-individual responses is when the standard deviation of change in the intervention sample is substantially larger than the same standard deviation derived from ...
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 3.46
James P. Raleigh3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Matthew D. Giles3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 5 AuthorsBrendon J. Gurd25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Queen's University)
High-intensity interval training (HIIT) improves peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics, however, it is unknown whether an optimal intensity of HIIT exists for eliciting improvements in these measures of whole-body oxidative metabolism. The purpose of this study was to (i) investigate the effect of interval intensity on training-induced adaptations in VO2peak and VO2 kinetics, and (ii) examine the impact of interval intensity on the frequency of nonresponders in VO2peak. T...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 3.46
Brendon J. Gurd25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Matthew D. Giles3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 5 AuthorsTrisha D. Scribbans9
Estimated H-index: 9
The current study sought to explore the incidence of nonresponders for maximal or submaximal performance following a variety of sprint interval training (SIT) protocols. Data from 63 young adults from 5 previously published studies were utilized in the current analysis. Nonresponders were identified using 2 times the typical error (TE) of measurement for peak oxygen uptake (2 × TE = 1.74 mL/(kg·min)), lactate threshold (2 × TE = 15.7 W), or 500 kcal time-to-completion (TTC; 2 × TE = 306 s) trial...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Physiological Reports
Jacob T. Bonafiglia5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Queen's University),
Andrea M. Brennan3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Queen's University)
+ 1 AuthorsBrendon J. Gurd25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Queen's University)
Published on May 22, 2019in Experimental Physiology 2.62
Greg Atkinson55
Estimated H-index: 55
(Teesside University),
Philip Williamson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Hull)
+ 0 AuthorsAlan M. Batterham37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Teesside University)