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References172
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Psychological Review 7.23
Morten Moshagen20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Ulm),
Benjamin E. Hilbig28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Koblenz and Landau),
Ingo Zettler23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Copenhagen)
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Journal of Business Ethics 2.92
Daphna Motro4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Arizona),
Lisa D. Ordóñez18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Arizona)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid T. Welsh7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Arizona State University)
Although emotion has become one of the most popular research areas within organizational scholarship, few studies have considered its connection with unethical behavior. Using dual-process theory, we expand on the rationalist perspective within the field of behavioral ethics by considering the process through which two discrete emotions, anger and guilt, influence unethical behavior. Across two studies using different methodologies, we found that anger increases unethical behavior whereas guilt ...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 1.30
Agne Kajackaite3
Estimated H-index: 3
I compare lying behavior in a real-effort task in which participants have control over outcomes and a task in which outcomes are determined by pure luck. Participants lie significantly more in the random-draw task than in the real-effort task, leading to the conclusion lying about luck is intrinsically less costly than lying about performance.
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Journal of Economic Surveys 2.30
Catrine Jacobsen4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Copenhagen),
Toke Reinholt Fosgaard6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Copenhagen),
David Pascual Ezama6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Complutense University of Madrid)
Over the last decade, a massive body of research has been devoted to uncovering human dishonesty. In the present paper, we review more than a hundred papers from this literature and provide a comprehensive overview by first listing the existing theoretical frameworks, and then covering the common empirical approaches, synthesizing the demographic and personal characteristics of those who cheat, identifying the behavioural mechanisms found that affect dishonesty and finally we finish by discussin...
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in International Economic Review 1.74
Glynis Gawn1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Merced),
Robert Innes21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of California, Merced)
Does honesty promote trust and trustworthiness? We investigate how being lied to (versus told the truth) in a Gneezy deception game affects behavior in a subsequent trust game with different players. Using a design that controls for potential treatment effects on payoffs, mood, and beliefs about the overall propensity for honesty in the experiment, we find that the specific experience of being lied to significantly erodes trust and trustworthiness.
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 2.50
E. P. Kleinlogel3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Joerg Dietz19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
John Antonakis30
Estimated H-index: 30
Despite substantial research on cheating, how and when individual predispositions figure into cheating behavior remains unclear. In Study 1, we investigated to what extent Honesty-Humility predicted cheating behavior. As expected, individuals high on Honesty-Humility were less likely to cheat than were individuals low on this trait. In Study 2, integrating arguments from personality research about traits with arguments from behavioral ethics about moral primes, we examined how Honesty-Humility a...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 1.30
Kai A. Konrad37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Max Planck Society),
Tim Lohse5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Sven A. Simon1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Max Planck Society)
Time is a crucial determinant of deception, since some misreporting opportunities come as a surprise and require an intuitive decision while others allow for extensive reflection time. To be able to pursue a deceptive strategy, however, a subject must be aware of the misreporting opportunity. This paper provides experimental evidence on the role of the time dimension for dishonest decision-making and for the cognition process of the chance to deceive. We conduct a laboratory experiment of self-s...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in The American Economic Review 4.53
Uri Gneezy45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Creed),
Agne Kajackaite3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Joel Sobel30
Estimated H-index: 30
This paper studies lying. An agent randomly picks a number from a known distribution. She can then report any number and receive a monetary payoff based only on her report. The paper presents a model of lying costs that generates hypotheses regarding behavior. In an experiment, we find that the highest fraction of lies is from reporting the maximal outcome, but some participants do not make the maximal lie. More participants lie partially when the experimenter cannot observe their outcomes than ...
33 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Economics Letters 0.58
Lara Ezquerra1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Gueorgui I. Kolev4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Middlesex University),
Ismael Rodriguez-Lara7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Middlesex University)
We use the die-paradigm to study gender differences in cheating behavior. We find that i) both males and females do not cheat in the absence of financial incentives, ii) both males and females cheat (but not maximally) if reports are associated with financial gains or losses, and iii) males and females do not cheat differentially.
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 1.30
Steffen Andersen19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Copenhagen Business School),
Uri Gneezy45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of California, San Diego)
+ 1 AuthorsJulie Marx1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Copenhagen Business School)
Reaction time, usually measured in seconds, has been shown to be correlated with decisions in experimental games. In this paper, we study how allowing for a full day of “reflection time” alters behavior. We compare behavior in dictator and cheating games when participants make immediate choices with behavior when participants have an extra day to decide, and find that allowing for more time does not affect behavior.
3 Citations Source Cite
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Newest
Published on May 10, 2019in arXiv: Physics and Society
Valerio Capraro15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Middlesex University)
Gender differences in human behaviour have attracted generations of social scientists, who have explored whether males and females act differently in domains involving competition, risk taking, cooperation, altruism, honesty, as well as many others. Yet, little is known about gender differences in the equity-efficiency trade-off. This gap is particularly important, because people in power of redistributing resources often face a conflict between equity and efficiency, to the point that this trad...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Economic Psychology 1.34
Christoph Schild1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Copenhagen),
Daniel W. Heck8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Mannheim)
+ 1 AuthorsIngo Zettler23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Copenhagen)
Abstract Dishonest behavior poses a crucial threat to individuals and societies at large. To highlight situation factors that potentially reduce the occurrence and/or extent of dishonesty, Ayal, Gino, Barkan, and Ariely (2015) introduced the REVISE framework, consisting of three principles: REminding, VIsibility, and SElf-engagement. The evidence that the three REVISE principles actually reduce dishonesty is not always strong and sometimes even inconsistent, however. We herein thus conceptually ...
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