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Ralph Hertwig
Max Planck Society
311Publications
44H-index
8,654Citations
Publications 311
Newest
#1Ralph HertwigH-Index: 1
#2Michael D. RyallH-Index: 12
Thaler and Sunstein (2008) advance the concept of "nudge" policies -- non-regulatory and non-fiscal mechanisms designed to enlist people's cognitive biases so as to achieve the desired policy ends. A core assumption is that policy makers engage biases to advance the interests of the nudged individual. We analyze a model of dynamic policy making in which the policy maker's preferences are not always aligned with those of the individual. One novelty of our setup is that one of the policy maker's o...
#1Mattea Dallacker (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 3
#2Ralph Hertwig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 44
Last.Jutta Mata (UMA: University of Mannheim)H-Index: 20
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#1Tomás Lejarraga (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 7
#2Michael Schulte-Mecklenbeck (University of Bern)H-Index: 10
Last.Ralph Hertwig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 44
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Abstract Loss aversion is often assumed to be a basic and far-reaching psychological regularity in behavior. Yet empirical evidence is accumulating to challenge the assumption of widespread loss aversion in choice. We suggest that a key reason for the apparently elusive nature of loss aversion may be that its manifestation in choice is state-dependent and distinct from a more state-independent principle of heightened attention to losses relative to gains. Using data from process-tracing studies,...
#1Lisa BruttelH-Index: 1
Last.Ralph HertwigH-Index: 44
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Being ignorant of key aspects of a strategic interaction can represent an advantage rather than a handicap. We study one particular context in which ignorance can be beneficial: iterated strategic interactions in which voluntary cooperation may be sustained into the final round if players voluntarily forego knowledge about the time horizon. We experimentally examine this option to remain ignorant about the time horizon in a finitely repeated two-person prisoners’ dilemma game. We confirm that pa...
#1Christina Leuker (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
#2Thorsten Pachur (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 23
Last.Timothy J. Pleskac (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 17
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#1Junyi Dai (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 3
#2Thorsten Pachur (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 23
Last.Ralph HertwigH-Index: 44
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#1Christina Leuker (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
#2Thorsten Pachur (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 23
Last.Timothy J. Pleskac (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 17
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#1Marwa El Zein (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 3
#2Bahador Bahrami (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 30
Last.Ralph Hertwig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 44
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Research investigating collective decision-making has focused primarily on the improvement of accuracy in collective decisions and less on the motives that drive individuals to make these decisions. We argue that a strong but neglected motive for making collective decisions is minimizing the material and psychological burden of an individual’s responsibility. Making difficult decisions with others shields individuals from the consequences of negative outcomes by reducing regret, punishment and s...
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