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Paternity Leave-Taking and Father Involvement among Socioeconomically Disadvantaged U.S. Fathers

Published on Jan 5, 2019in Sex Roles2.28
· DOI :10.1007/s11199-018-0994-5
Chris Knoester10
Estimated H-index: 10
(OSU: Ohio State University),
Richard J. Petts11
Estimated H-index: 11
(BSU: Ball State University),
Brianne Pragg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
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Abstract
In the present study, we examine the associations between the amount of time that U.S. employed fathers took off from work after the birth of a child (i.e., paternity leave-taking) and trajectories of how frequently fathers engage with their children and take responsibility for them. To do so, we analyze longitudinal data on 2109 fathers from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a data set that contains information from disproportionately socioeconomically disadvantaged families from large urban areas. The results indicate that, 1 year after birth, paternity leave-taking and lengths of leave are positively associated with fathers’ engagement and responsibility. In addition, paternity leave-taking is positively associated with trajectories of fathers’ responsibility over the first 5 years after birth. Lengths of paternity leave are positively associated with trajectories of fathers’ engagement. Finally, there is evidence that paternity leave-taking and lengths of leave-taking are especially likely to boost fathers’ engagement and responsibility among nonresident fathers. Overall, the findings from the present study suggest that an expansion of paternity leave-taking may encourage higher subsequent levels of father involvement—especially among nonresident fathers.
  • References (40)
  • Citations (1)
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References40
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Journal of Marriage and Family2.58
Richard J. Petts11
Estimated H-index: 11
(BSU: Ball State University),
Chris Knoester10
Estimated H-index: 10
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Published on May 7, 2018in Community, Work & Family
Richard J. Petts11
Estimated H-index: 11
(BSU: Ball State University),
Chris Knoester10
Estimated H-index: 10
(OSU: Ohio State University),
Qi Li1
Estimated H-index: 1
(OSU: Ohio State University)
ABSTRACTSurprisingly few studies have focused on paternity leave-taking in the US. This study utilizes data from three national datasets to provide a comprehensive examination of the attitudes, practices and predictors of paid paternity leave-taking in the US. Specifically, this study focuses on (a) describing attitudes towards fathers receiving a share of paid parental leave, (b) describing rates and lengths of paid paternity leave-taking and (c) analyzing the extent to which economic capital, ...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Journal of Family Issues1.61
Brianne Pragg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Chris Knoester10
Estimated H-index: 10
(OSU: Ohio State University)
The United States lags behind other industrialized countries in its lack of inclusive parental leave policy after the birth or adoption of a child. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,233), this study examines the patterns and predictors of fathers’ parental leave use, as well as its association with father–child engagement. Our findings indicate that the vast majority of employed fathers take parental leave, but they rarely take more than one week of leave. Fat...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Journal of Family Issues1.61
Jay Fagan25
Estimated H-index: 25
(TU: Temple University),
Mollie Cherson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(TU: Temple University)
Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,605), the present study examined two aspects of maternal gatekeeping in relation to low-income predominantly nonresidential fathers’ engagement with young children: facilitation and encouragement. The results showed that maternal encouragement when children were 3 years old was positively and longitudinally related to higher levels of paternal engagement with 5 year old children. However, maternal facilitation at age 3 was neg...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Social Policy2.30
Michelle Brady8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Emily Stevens2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 2 AuthorsBill Martin10
Estimated H-index: 10
Governments are increasingly implementing policies that encourage early father-infant bonding. However, to date, research has not systematically examined fathers’ perspectives and experiences of early bonding. Using a social constructionist embodiment perspective we argue that paternal bonding is best conceived as a process of repeated, embodied performances that are shaped by gendered parenting discourses. Drawing on 100 semi-structured interviews with a diverse group of Australian fathers of y...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Journal of Family Issues1.61
Julia S. Goldberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
The literature on father involvement suggests that the value men ascribe to being a father is important for understanding their involvement with their children, yet this theory has received only limited empirical attention. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 3,197), I examined the association between the psychological centrality of men’s father identity at the time their child was born and their trajectories of involvement during their child’s first 5 years, payi...
Published on Dec 1, 2014in European Journal of Social Security
Maria del Carmen Huerta6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Willem Adema18
Estimated H-index: 18
+ 4 AuthorsJane Waldfogel60
Estimated H-index: 60
In recent years, several OECD countries have taken steps to promote policies encouraging fathers to spend more time caring for young children, thereby promoting a more gender equal division of care work. Evidence, mainly for the United States and United Kingdom, has shown fathers taking some time off work around childbirth are more likely to be involved in childcare related activities than fathers who do not take time off. This article reports on a first cross-national analysis of the associatio...
Published on Dec 1, 2014in Journal of Family Theory and Review2.80
Kay Pasley21
Estimated H-index: 21
(FSU: Florida State University),
Raymond E. Petren3
Estimated H-index: 3
(FSU: Florida State University),
Jessica N. Fish8
Estimated H-index: 8
(FSU: Florida State University)
Our goal was to assess the contributions of identity theory to fathering research by critically reviewing the fathering literature that incorporated concepts and assumptions from this theory to frame their efforts. Overall, research findings support the association between father identity and fathering behavior, although differences in the nuance of theoretical constructs (status vs. role) in this association are less pronounced. We identify several weaknesses in this literature (e.g., variation...
Published on Feb 1, 2014in Gender & Society3.06
Erin M. Rehel1
Estimated H-index: 1
(YSU: Youngstown State University)
Drawing from 85 semi-structured interviews with fathers and mothers in three cities (Montreal, Toronto, and Chicago), I argue that when fathers in heterosexual couples experience the transition to parenthood in ways that are structurally comparable to mothers, they come to think about and enact parenting in ways that are more similar to mothers. I consider the specific role played by extended time off immediately after the birth of a child in structuring that experience. By drawing fathers into ...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in Demography2.49
Mari Rege18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Stavanger),
Ingeborg Foldøy Solli6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Stavanger)
Using Norwegian registry data, we investigate the effect of paternity leave on fathers’ long-term earnings. If the paternity leave increased long-term father involvement, then we should expect a reduction in fathers’ long-term earnings as they shift time and effort from market to home production. For identification, we use the Norwegian introduction of a paternity-leave quota in 1993, reserving four weeks of the total of 42 weeks of paid parental leave exclusively for the father. The introductio...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on May 4, 2019in Sex Roles2.28
Richard J. Petts11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Chris Knoester10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 0 AuthorsJane Waldfogel
Paternity leave-taking is believed to benefit children by encouraging father-child bonding after a birth and enabling commitments to fathers’ engagement. Yet, no known U.S. studies have directly focused on the associations between paternity leave-taking and children’s reports of father-child relationships. Understanding the potential consequences of paternity leave-taking in the United States is particularly important given the lack of a national paid parental leave policy. The present study use...
View next paperFathers’ Paternity Leave-Taking and Children’s Perceptions of Father-Child Relationships in the United States