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Brianne Pragg
Pennsylvania State University
3Publications
1H-index
12Citations
Publications 3
Newest
Published on Jan 5, 2019in Sex Roles2.28
Chris Knoester10
Estimated H-index: 10
(OSU: Ohio State University),
Richard J. Petts11
Estimated H-index: 11
(BSU: Ball State University),
Brianne Pragg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
In the present study, we examine the associations between the amount of time that U.S. employed fathers took off from work after the birth of a child (i.e., paternity leave-taking) and trajectories of how frequently fathers engage with their children and take responsibility for them. To do so, we analyze longitudinal data on 2109 fathers from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a data set that contains information from disproportionately socioeconomically disadvantaged families from ...
Published on Nov 7, 2017in Journal of Family Issues1.61
Valarie King25
Estimated H-index: 25
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Lisa M. Boyd3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Yale University),
Brianne Pragg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
Adolescents in stepfamilies and single-parent families tend to report lower levels of well-being than adolescents who live with two biological parents. Using data from Add Health (n = 16,684), the present study builds on this literature by examining family-level predictors of adolescent depressive symptoms, delinquency, failing a class, heavy alcohol use, tobacco use, and marijuana use. We focus on feelings of family belonging as a predictor of adolescent well-being and find that this measure is...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Journal of Family Issues1.61
Brianne Pragg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Chris Knoester10
Estimated H-index: 10
(OSU: Ohio State University)
The United States lags behind other industrialized countries in its lack of inclusive parental leave policy after the birth or adoption of a child. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2,233), this study examines the patterns and predictors of fathers’ parental leave use, as well as its association with father–child engagement. Our findings indicate that the vast majority of employed fathers take parental leave, but they rarely take more than one week of leave. Fat...
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