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AN ASSESSMENT OF STONE WEAPON TIP STANDARDIZATION DURING THE CLOVIS–FOLSOM TRANSITION IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES

Published on Oct 1, 2018in American Antiquity
· DOI :10.1017/aaq.2018.53
Briggs Buchanan22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Brian Andrews5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 1 AuthorsMetin I. Eren24
Estimated H-index: 24
Abstract
  • References (46)
  • Citations (1)
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References46
Newest
#1Briggs Buchanan (TU: University of Tulsa)H-Index: 22
#2Brian Andrews (Rogers State University)H-Index: 5
Last. Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 5
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The Peopling of the Americas was a multi-millennium process involving both the hunter-gatherer colonization of new landscapes as well as the ‘settling in’ to local environments. This process is typically identified archaeologically by an increase in the number of recognized point types, site frequency, changes in subsistence patterns, and increased geographic patterning in stone tool variation. Here, we add to this list by examining preferential toolstone use by Clovis and Folsom people...
2 CitationsSource
#1Joseph A. DeAngelis (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 1
#2R Leelyman (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 41
Early Paleo-Indians in North America are historically hypothesized to have been large-game specialists. Despite decades of research, Early Paleo-Indian diets are alternately portrayed as of either specialist or generalist. Though some suggest that these terms are not useful, debate over the nature of these diets continues. Authors who have studied Early Paleo-Indian archaeofaunas from North America have analyzed either a conservative dataset, consisting only of taxa whose remains meet criteria i...
3 CitationsSource
#1Frédéric Sellet (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 7
This chapter investigates the technological organizations of Clovis and Folsom lithic systems in the context of the paleoenvironmental changes that took place at the end of the Pleistocene and during the Younger Dryas period. It is argued that technological similarities and inferred historical connections between the two Paleoindian traditions are superficial and that most organizational differences are pointing to variable subsistence practices and discrete mobility patterns dictated by differe...
1 CitationsSource
#1Meaghan Marie Emery-Wetherell (CWU: Central Washington University)H-Index: 1
#2Brianna K. McHorse (Harvard University)H-Index: 5
Last. Edward Byrd Davis (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
Abstract. The late Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions may have been the first extinctions directly related to human activity, but in North America the close temporal proximity of human arrival and the Younger Dryas climate event has hindered efforts to identify the ultimate extinction cause. Previous work evaluating the roles of climate change and human activity in the North American megafaunal extinction has been stymied by a reliance on geographic binning, yielding contradictory results among ...
8 CitationsSource
#1Kaitlyn A. Thomas (SMU: Southern Methodist University)H-Index: 1
#2Brett A. Story (SMU: Southern Methodist University)H-Index: 7
Last. David J. Meltzer (SMU: Southern Methodist University)H-Index: 37
view all 7 authors...
Clovis groups, the first widely successful colonizers of North America, had a distinctive technology, whereby manufacturers removed flakes to thin the bases of their stone projectile points, creating “flutes.” That process is challenging to learn and costly to implement, yet was used continent-wide. It has long been debated whether fluting conferred any adaptive benefit. We compared standardized models of fluted and unfluted points: analytically, by way of static, linear finite element modeling ...
13 CitationsSource
#1Thomas A. Jennings (University of West Georgia)H-Index: 11
Multiple hypotheses have been proposed to explain the relationship between fully fluted Folsom points and unfluted Midland points. One hypothesis, proposed by Hofman (1992, “Recognition and interpretation of Folsom technological variability on the southern plains.” In Ice Age Hunters of the Rockies, edited by D. J. Stanford, and J. S. Day, 193–229. Boulder: University Press of Colorado), is that mobile Folsom bands shifted from making Folsom points, which often fatally broke during the productio...
6 CitationsSource
#1Todd A. Surovell (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 10
#2Joshua R. Boyd (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 1
Last. Gregory W. L. Hodgins (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
Using a set of high-quality radiocarbon dates, including three new dates from the Hanson site and one from the Folsom component of Hell Gap, we provide a revised estimate of the duration of the Folsom period. Limiting our sample to bone collagen samples pretreated using the XAD resin chromatographic or ultrafiltration techniques, calcined bone, and charcoal from hearth features, we show that Folsom sites fall within a limited range from 12,610 to 12,170 BP, or 440 years. This duration is conside...
15 CitationsSource
#1Leland C. Bement (OU: University of Oklahoma)H-Index: 8
The Beaver River Complex (northwest Oklahoma) of early Paleoindian (Clovis and Folsom) large-scale bison kill sites began contributing to our knowledge of Folsom hunting organization two decades ago with the identification, excavation, and analysis of the Cooper site. Since then a total of five Folsom kill components have been identified at three arroyo kill sites within a 700 m reach of the Beaver River. The Folsom projectile point assemblages are analyzed to determine the level of flint knappi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Todd A. Surovell (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 10
#2Spencer R. Pelton (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 3
Last. Adam D. Myers (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 60
view all 4 authors...
Following Martin [Martin PS (1973) Science 179:969–974], we propose the hypothesis that the timing of human arrival to the New World can be assessed by examining the ecological impacts of a small population of people on extinct Pleistocene megafauna. To that end, we compiled lists of direct radiocarbon dates on paleontological specimens of extinct genera from North and South America with the expectation that the initial decline of extinct megafauna should correspond in time with the initial evid...
31 CitationsSource
#1David J. Meltzer (SMU: Southern Methodist University)H-Index: 37
Clovis groups in Late Pleistocene North America occasionally hunted several now extinct large mammals. But whether their hunting drove 37 genera of animals to extinction has been disputed, largely for want of kill sites. Overkill proponents argue that there is more archaeological evidence than we ought to expect, that humans had the wherewithal to decimate what may have been millions of animals, and that the appearance of humans and the disappearance of the fauna is too striking to be a mere coi...
27 CitationsSource
Cited By1
Newest
#1Briggs BuchananH-Index: 22
#2Mark CollardH-Index: 33
Last. Michael J. O'BrienH-Index: 69
view all 3 authors...
Recent work has demonstrated that Goshen points overlap in time with another group of unfluted lanceolate points from the Plains, Plainview points. This has raised the question of whether the two types should be kept separate or consolidated into a single type. We sought to resolve this issue by applying geometric morphometric methods to a sample of points from well-documented Goshen and Plainview assemblages. We found that their shapes were statistically indistinguishable, which indicates that ...
Source
#1Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 5
#2G. Logan Miller (ISU: Illinois State University)H-Index: 6
view all 11 authors...
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