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Metin I. Eren
Kent State University
GeologyArchaeologyPrehistoryStone toolProjectile point
45Publications
6H-index
113Citations
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Publications 44
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#1Michelle R. Bebber (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 5
#2Michael Wilson (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 1
Last. Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 6
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Why, despite over 30,000 years of ceramic technology and tool diversity documented in the archaeological record – including examples of knapped ceramic scraping tools – was the ceramic arrowhead never invented? Here, we first review the use of ceramic projectile technology and tool use in the archaeological record. Then, via controlled ballistics tests, we investigate whether functional constraints played a role in this global non-invention. By creating “best case” and “worst case” mode...
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#1Anna Mika (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 1
#2Kat Flood (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 1
Last. Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 6
view all 10 authors...
Before Europeans arrived to Eastern North America, prehistoric, indigenous peoples experienced a number of changes that culminated in the development of sedentary, maize agricultural lifeways of varying complexity. Inherent to these lifeways were several triggers of social stress including population nucleation and increase, intergroup conflict (warfare), and increased territoriality. Here, we examine whether this period of social stress co-varied with deadlier weaponry, specifically, the design...
1 CitationsSource
#1Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 6
Source
#1Justin Pargeter (UJ: University of Johannesburg)H-Index: 12
#2Paloma de la Peña (University of the Witwatersrand)H-Index: 10
Last. Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 6
view all 3 authors...
This paper concludes a long-term experimental study to examine the role of bipolar and freehand reduction as strategies for lithic miniaturization on milky quartz and flint. The experiments provide clear quantifiable guidelines for identifying bipolar reduction in archeological assemblages. They suggest that with bipolar reduction—a straightforward and time-efficient strategy to learn—toolmakers could easily surpass the cutting edge/mass efficiency levels of more derived lithic reduction strateg...
3 CitationsSource
#1Angelia Werner (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 3
#2Andrew Kramer (University of Akron)H-Index: 1
Last. Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 6
view all 6 authors...
Archaeologists recognize countless styles of flaked stone projectile points in the archaeological record, but few are as well recognized as the Clovis fluted projectile point. This specimen has a number of interesting morphological and technological features, but one prominent question of its functional morphology involves the lateral edges of the proximal (basal) portion of the point, where it was attached (hafted) to a handle or shaft. These edges are usually ground (or abraded) dull, presumab...
5 CitationsSource
#1Veronica Mraz (TU: University of Tulsa)H-Index: 2
#2Mike Fisch (Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology)H-Index: 1
Last. Briggs Buchanan (TU: University of Tulsa)H-Index: 24
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Intentional heat treating of toolstone has been documented to have begun at least by 70 K BP; however, the advantages of such treatment have been debated for decades. There are two schools of thought with regard to its purpose. One, is that it merely reduces the force required for flake propagation. A second is that it also alters flake morphological properties. We systematically tested these hypotheses by generating flakes from cores exposed to three different temperatures (ambient, 300 °C, and...
4 CitationsSource
#1Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 6
#2Michelle R. Bebber (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 5
Last. Mary Ann Raghanti (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 23
view all 7 authors...
Abstract The ethnographic account of an Inuit man manufacturing a knife from his own frozen feces to butcher and disarticulate a dog has permeated both the academic literature and popular culture. To evaluate the validity of this claim, we tested the basis of that account via experimental archaeology. Our experiments assessed the functionality of knives made from human feces in controlled conditions that provided optimal conditions for success. However, they were not functional. While much resea...
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#3Michelle R. BebberH-Index: 5
Last. Jeremy C. WilliamsH-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
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#1Michelle R. BebberH-Index: 5
#2Metin I. ErenH-Index: 6
Source
#1Michelle R. Bebber (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 5
#2James D. Norris (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 1
Last. Metin I. Eren (KSU: Kent State University)H-Index: 6
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Archaeologists have attributed the decline of North American utilitarian copper tools to changes in demography and social complexity during the Archaic to Woodland transition, ca. 3000 B.P. However, not all utilitarian copper tools disappeared: the copper awl persisted. Given that the copper tool types that disappeared, such as projectile points and knives, have been experimentally shown to be functionally inferior to their non-copper counterparts, we tested whether the copper awl persi...
1 CitationsSource
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