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Debris-carrying camouflage among diverse lineages of Cretaceous insects

Published on Jun 1, 2016in Science Advances
· DOI :10.1126/sciadv.1501918
Bo Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Fangyuan Xia5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 7 AuthorsJes Rust16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Bonn)
Abstract
Insects have evolved diverse methods of camouflage that have played an important role in their evolutionary success. Debris-carrying, a behavior of actively harvesting and carrying exogenous materials, is among the most fascinating and complex behaviors because it requires not only an ability to recognize, collect, and carry materials but also evolutionary adaptations in related morphological characteristics. However, the fossil record of such behavior is extremely scarce, and only a single Mesozoic example from Spanish amber has been recorded; therefore, little is known about the early evolution of this complicated behavior and its underlying anatomy. We report a diverse insect assemblage of exceptionally preserved debris carriers from Cretaceous Burmese, French, and Lebanese ambers, including the earliest known chrysopoid larvae (green lacewings), myrmeleontoid larvae (split-footed lacewings and owlflies), and reduviids (assassin bugs). These ancient insects used a variety of debris material, including insect exoskeletons, sand grains, soil dust, leaf trichomes of gleicheniacean ferns, wood fibers, and other vegetal debris. They convergently evolved their debris-carrying behavior through multiple pathways, which expressed a high degree of evolutionary plasticity. We demonstrate that the behavioral repertoire, which is associated with considerable morphological adaptations, was already widespread among insects by at least the Mid-Cretaceous. Together with the previously known Spanish specimen, these fossils are the oldest direct evidence of camouflaging behavior in the fossil record. Our findings provide a novel insight into early evolution of camouflage in insects and ancient ecological associations among plants and insects.
  • References (43)
  • Citations (27)
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References43
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Palaeoworld 1.09
Sibelle Maksoud6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Dany Azar6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsRaymond Gèze7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Lebanese University)
Abstract The “Gres du Liban” [Sandstone of Lebanon] is the basal lithostratigraphic unit for the Cretaceous series in Lebanon. In the upper part of these siliciclastic-dominated strata we identified three discrete intervals characterized by their richness in amber with biological inclusions, mostly insects. The middle and upper intervals previously attributed to an Early Aptian (= Bedoulian) age are nowadays ascribed to the Early and Late Barremian respectively; the lower interval is Early Barre...
23 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 14, 2016in Carnets de Géologie 0.76
Bruno Granier15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Christopher Toland1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsSibelle Maksoud6
Estimated H-index: 6
The stratigraphic framework of the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous strata of Lebanon that dates back to Dubertret's publications required either consolidation or full revision. The preliminary results of our investigations in the Mount Lebanon region are presented here. We provide new micropaleontological and sedimentological information on the Salima Oolitic Limestones, which is probably an unconformity-bounded unit (possibly Early Valanginian in age), and the "Gres du Liban" (Barremian in ...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Arthropod Structure & Development 1.70
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Harvard University),
Xavier Delclòs18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Barcelona)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
Abstract Amber holds special paleobiological significance due to its ability to preserve direct evidence of biotic interactions and animal behaviors for millions of years. Here we review the finding of Hallucinochrysa diogenesi Perez-de la Fuente, Delclos, Penalver and Engel, 2012, a morphologically atypical larva related to modern green lacewings (Insecta: Neuroptera) that was described in Early Cretaceous amber from the El Soplao outcrop (northern Spain). The fossil larva is preserved with a d...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Biology Letters 3.35
Graeme D. Ruxton54
Estimated H-index: 54
(St And: University of St Andrews),
Martin Stevens38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Exeter)
Many animals decorate themselves through the accumulation of environmental material on their exterior. Decoration has been studied across a range of different taxa, but there are substantial limits to current understanding. Decoration in non-humans appears to function predominantly in defence against predators and parasites, although an adaptive function is often assumed rather than comprehensively demonstrated. It seems predominantly an aquatic phenomenon—presumably because buoyancy helps reduc...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 31, 2015in eLife 7.62
Bo Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Fangyuan Xia5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 4 AuthorsJacek Szwedo13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Gdańsk)
Many animals care for and protect their offspring to increase their survival and fitness. Insects care for their young using a range of strategies: some dig underground chambers for their young, whilst others carry their brood around on their own bodies. However, it was unclear when these strategies first evolved in insects. Now Wang et al. report that they have discovered the earliest fossil evidence of an insect caring for its young, in the form of a female insect preserved with her brood in a...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 14, 2014in Carnets de Géologie 0.76
Sibelle Maksoud6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Bruno Granier15
Estimated H-index: 15
+ 3 AuthorsJosep Anton Moreno-Bedmar13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)
The "Falaise de Blanche" is a prominent cliff, consisting mostly of Lower Cretaceous limestones that extends as linear outcrops over most of the Lebanese territory and provides geologists a remarkable reference for stratigraphic studies. However, until now, this unit was lacking a clear definition. We introduce herein the Jezzinian Regional Stage, the type-locality of which is at Jezzine. It equates as an unconformity-bounded unit and, per definition, it is framed by two discontinuities. Because...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2014in Zoomorphology 1.40
Felipe M. Gawryszewski6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Macquarie University)
Crab spiders (Thomisidae) are known by their ability to change their body colouration via change in epithelial pigments. However, the crab spider genus Stephanopis appears to match the colouration of the bark they are sitting on by having debris attached to its dorsal cuticle. The functional morphology, colouration, and evolution of this phenomenon were investigated in Stephanopis cf. scabra and S. cambridgei. Analysis under the microscope revealed that debris originated from the bark they were ...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 19, 2014in Zootaxa 0.93
Davide Badano3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Roberto Pantaleoni6
Estimated H-index: 6
The larvae of all the European genera of Ascalaphidae are compared for the first time, highlighting the differential characters for identification purposes. The larva of the genus Ascalaphus is described for the first time while those of Puer, Bubopsis and Deleproctophylla are deeply revised. Actually, the larvae of Ascalaphus festivus (Rambur), Puer maculatus (Olivier), Bubopsis agrionoides (Rambur), Deleproctophylla australis (Rambur), Libelloides latinus (Lefebvre), Libelloides corsicus (Ramb...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2014in Annals of The Entomological Society of America 1.56
Catherine A. Tauber2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Maurice J. Tauber1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Gilberto S. Albuquerque11
Estimated H-index: 11
Larval debris-carrying, which occurs in many insect taxa, is a remarkable behavioral trait with substantial life history significance. For the Chrysopidae, information on the topic is scattered, and the habit's diversity and evolutionary history are unassessed. Here, we compile a comprehensive, annotated catalog on chrysopid debris-carrying and its associated larval morphology, and we identify emerging systematic patterns of variation, from larval nakedness to the construction of elaborate packe...
29 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 20, 2013in ZooKeys 1.08
Vladimir N. Makarkin16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Qiang Yang10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 1 AuthorsRen Dong1
Estimated H-index: 1
A well-developed recurrent veinlet is found in the forewing of two species of Nymphidae from the Middle Jurassic locality of Daohugou (Inner Mongolia, China), Liminympha makarkini Ren & Engel and Daonymphes bisulca gen. et sp. n. This is the first record of this trait in the clade comprised of the superfamilies Myrmeleontoidea and Chrysopoidea. We interpret the recurrent veinlet in these species as a remnant of the condition present more basally in the psychopsoid + ithonoid + chrysopoid + myrme...
20 Citations Source Cite
Cited By27
Newest
Published on Jan 24, 2019in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2.33
Xiumei Lu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CAU: China Agricultural University),
Jiahui Hu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAU: China Agricultural University)
+ 3 AuthorsXingyue Liu13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAU: China Agricultural University)
Myrmeleontidae (antlions) is the most species-rich family of the holometabolous order Neuroptera. Evolutionary history of this diverse lacewing family remains largely unexplored. Here we report on three new genera and four new species of antlions from the mid-Cretaceous amber of Myanmar, namely Allopteroneura burmana Lu, Zhang & Liu gen. et sp. nov., Phylloleon elegans Lu, Wang & Liu gen. et sp. nov., Phylloleon stangei Lu, Ohl & Liu gen. et sp. nov. and Nanoleon wangae Hu, Lu & Liu gen. et sp. ...
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Published on Feb 7, 2019in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Shaun L. Winterton20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Jessica P. Gillung4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
+ 11 AuthorsMervyn W. Mansell12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Pretoria)
Source Cite
Published on Dec 20, 2018in Palaeontology 3.73
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
+ 1 AuthorsEnrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)
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Published on Dec 26, 2018in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Ivonne J. Garzón-Orduña (UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico), Shaun L. Winterton20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 7 AuthorsXingyue Liu13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAU: China Agricultural University)
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Organisms Diversity & Evolution 2.37
Jun Chen4
Estimated H-index: 4
(LYU: Linyi University),
Bo Wang33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 5 AuthorsHaichun Zhang20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Like many fossil insect groups, the systematic framework of extinct ‘Homoptera’ is mainly based on venational traits of isolated wings; most taxa of Mesozoic Sinoalidae, however, were erected with whole-bodied specimens. On the basis of new fossil data and phylogenetic analyses, this froghopper family is herein chosen as a case study to discuss the potential influence of the absence and/or neglect of body information in palaeoentomological studies. Mesodorus orientalis Chen et Wang, gen. et sp. ...
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Qingqing Zhang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Keyu Chen (Nanjing Normal University)+ 3 AuthorsBo Wang33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Zhangsolvidae is an extinct family of brachycerous flies with long proboscis that is known only from the Cretaceous. This family is considered a pollinator of Cretaceous gymnosperms. Two new species, Burmomyia rossi gen. et sp. nov. and Cratomyia zhuoi sp. nov., are described in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber from the Hukawng Valley in northern Myanmar. An updated key to all known genera and species of Zhangsolvidae is also given. Our study suggests that zhangsolvids had a relatively high...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Jun Chen8
Estimated H-index: 8
(LYU: Linyi University),
Bo Wang33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 5 AuthorsHaichun Zhang20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The Cicadellidae, one of largest insect families, is highly diversified in its living groups; fossils of this family, however, are poorly documented. Up to now, only three modern cicadellid subfamilies have been reported from the late Mesozoic, represented by five monotypic genera. We herein erect a new taxon, Qilia regilla gen. et sp. nov., from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber, and tentatively ascribe it to Ledrinae: Paracarsonini. The new genus differs distinctly from other Paracarsonini...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Biologia 0.70
Peter Vršanský1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Lucia Šmídová3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Charles University in Prague)
+ 14 AuthorsDany Azar6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Myrmecophilous and termitophilous interactions likely contributed to the competitive advantage and evolutionary success of eusocial insects, but how these commensal and parasitic relationships originated is unclear due to absence of fossil records. New extinct cockroaches of the still living family Blattidae are reported here from the Cretaceous Myanmar amber (99 Ma) and are the earliest known inhabitants of complex ant nests, demonstrating that this specialised myrmecophily originated shortly a...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Tian Jiang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences),
Bo Wang33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jacek Szwedo13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Gdańsk)
Abstract Gakasha calcaridentata gen. et sp. nov. representing Progonocimicidae: Cicadocorinae (moss bugs) is described. It is the first record of Coleorrhyncha in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber and the second in fossil resins from the Cretaceous period. The taxonomic position of some taxa placed in the genus Mesocimex is analysed and new placements proposed. The fossil record of Cicadocorinae is discussed.
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