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Bo Wang
Chinese Academy of Sciences
CretaceousPaleontologyEcologyChinaBiology
109Publications
22H-index
1,613Citations
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Publications 108
Newest
#1LIChunxiang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
#2Robbin C. Moran (NYBG: New York Botanical Garden)H-Index: 24
Last. HAOJiasheng (Anhui Normal University)H-Index: 9
view all 5 authors...
Abstract A new fossil belonging to the Lindsaeaceae is described as Proodontosoria myanmarensis gen. et sp. nov. from the mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber. Its classification in the extant Lindsaeaceae is based on laterally fused vein tips that bear sori, indusia opening toward the segment margins, and trilete spores. The number of annulus cells and the size of sporangium suggest that the fossil probably belongs to a stem group element of this family.
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#1Tong Bao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 1
#2Bo Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 22
Last. David L. Dilcher (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 7
view all 4 authors...
Insect pollination of flowering plants (angiosperms) is responsible for the majority of the world’s flowering plant diversity and is key to the Cretaceous radiation of angiosperms. Although both insects and angiosperms were common by the mid-Cretaceous, direct fossil evidence of insect pollination is lacking. Direct evidence of Cretaceous insect pollination is associated with insect-gymnosperm pollination. Here, we report a specialized beetle-angiosperm pollination mode from mid-Cretaceous Burme...
7 CitationsSource
#1Tingting Yu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 1
#2Richard S. Kelly (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 4
Last. David L. Dilcher (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 7
view all 10 authors...
Amber is fossilized tree resin, and inclusions usually comprise terrestrial and, rarely, aquatic organisms. Marine fossils are extremely rare in Cretaceous and Cenozoic ambers. Here, we report a record of an ammonite with marine gastropods, intertidal isopods, and diverse terrestrial arthropods as syninclusions in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. We used X-ray–microcomputed tomography (CT) to obtain high-resolution 3D images of the ammonite, including its sutures, which are diagnostically important...
37 CitationsSource
#1Manja Hethke (FU: Free University of Berlin)H-Index: 7
#2Franz T. Fürsich (FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)H-Index: 39
Last. Stephen C. Weeks (University of Akron)H-Index: 23
view all 6 authors...
4 CitationsSource
#1Daran Zheng (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 9
#2André Nel (University of Paris)H-Index: 33
Last. Bo Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
The damselfly superfamily Coenagrionoidea is the largest zygopteran group, comprising three-fifths of all extant damselfly species. The Mesozoic fossil record of this superfamily is sparse, whilst it is relatively common in Burmese amber. A new coenagrionoid family, Burmacoenagrionidae Zheng et al., fam. nov., is established here based on four new species in three new genera: Burmacoenagrion pretiosus Zheng et al. gen. et sp. nov., Burmachistigma cheni Zheng et al. gen. et sp. nov., Electrocoena...
2 CitationsSource
#1Zixiao Yang (NU: Nanjing University)H-Index: 2
#2Shengyu Wang (NU: Nanjing University)H-Index: 2
Last. Baoyu Jiang (NU: Nanjing University)H-Index: 14
view all 9 authors...
Abstract The Middle–Upper Jurassic Yanliao Lagerstatte contains numerous exceptionally preserved fossils of aquatic and land organisms, including insects, salamanders, dinosaurs, pterosaurs and mammaliaforms. Despite extensive study of the diversity and evolutionary implications of the biota, the palaeoenvironmental setting and taphonomy of the fossils remain poorly understood. We reconstruct both the palaeoenvironment of the Daohugou area (one of the most famous Yanliao fossil areas), and the b...
4 CitationsSource
#1He Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 10
#2Suryendu Dutta (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 19
Last. Haichun Zhang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 21
view all 12 authors...
Abstract The palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of central Tibet is key to understanding the uplift history of the Tibetan Plateau, which had a profound influence on Cenozoic global climate and biotic change. Here we report an amber layer from the lower part of the Dingqing Formation (late Oligocene) in Lunpola of central Tibet, which is the first record of amber from Tibet. Herein we find that Lunpola amber is derived from dipterocarp trees, as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry...
4 CitationsSource
#1Daran Zheng (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
#2Su-Chin Chang (HKU: University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 13
Last. Bo Wang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
Abstract The fossil dragonfly is a perfect model to study past biogeography. Araripegomphidae is an ancient Gondwanan family comprising the sole genus Araripegomphus previously from the Crato Formation (Upper Aptian) of Brazil. For the first time, a non-rock find, Araripegomphus shai sp. nov., is here described from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. This rare araripegomphid dragonfly extends the range of Araripegomphus to the west Burma block.
3 CitationsSource
#1Yan Fang (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)H-Index: 2
#2A. D. Muscente (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 10
Last. Shuhai Xiao (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 57
view all 5 authors...
A new genus and species of the Elcanidae (Orthoptera, Elcanoidea), Cascadelcana virginiana n. gen. n. sp., is described based on a forewing specimen from the Upper Triassic (Norian) Cow Branch Formation in the Solite Quarry Lagerstatte near the North Carolina-Virginia boundary, USA. It is distinguished from other elcanid species by its RP +MA1 with six branches, M with two branches before stem MA1 fused with RP, and short CuA almost vertical against the posterior margin. This fossil represents t...
2 CitationsSource
#1Daran Zheng (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
#2André Nel (University of Paris)H-Index: 33
Last. Haichun Zhang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 21
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The clade Aeshnoptera contains the most diverse fossil dragonfly in China, mainly recorded in the Lower Cretaceous. Here, a new aeshnopteran dragonfly, Paradecoraeshna liaoningensis Zheng, Nel and Zhang, gen. et sp. nov., attributed to the family Progobiaeshnidae, is described from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning, NE China. Within Progobiaeshnidae, Paradecoraeshna gen. nov. shares mixed characters with Decoraeshna and Mongoliaeshna. These genera are well-differentiated...
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