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Literature Review on Needs of Upper Limb Prosthesis Users.

Published on May 12, 2016in Frontiers in Neuroscience3.65
· DOI :10.3389/fnins.2016.00209
Francesca Cordella5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Università Campus Bio-Medico),
Anna Lisa Ciancio6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Università Campus Bio-Medico)
+ 4 AuthorsLoredana Zollo17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Università Campus Bio-Medico)
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Abstract
The loss of one hand can significantly affect the level of autonomy and the capability of performing daily living, working and social activities. The current prosthetic solutions contribute in a poor way to overcome these problems due to the limitations of the interfaces adopted for controlling the prosthesis and to the absence of force or tactile feedback which limit the hand grasp capabilities. In order to provide indications for further developments in the prosthetic field to increase user satisfaction rates and therefore to reduce device abandonment, this paper reports a literature review on needs analysis of upper limb prosthesis users, by pointing out the critical aspects of the prosthetic solutions in terms of users satisfaction and activities of daily living they would like to perform with the prosthetic device. A list of requirements for upper limb prostheses is proposed, grounded on the performed analysis on user needs. The defined list of requirements for the prosthetic system aims to provide (i) some guidelines for improving the level of acceptability and usefulness of the prosthesis, by accounting for hand functional and technical aspects; (ii) a possible functional scheme of a PNS-based prosthetic system able to satisfy the emerged user wishes; (iii) some hints for improving the quality of the methods (such as questionnaires) adopted for understanding the user satisfaction with their prosthesis.
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  • References (50)
  • Citations (58)
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References50
Newest
Erina Cho1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SFU: Simon Fraser University),
Richard Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SFU: Simon Fraser University)
+ 3 AuthorsCarlo Menon24
Estimated H-index: 24
(SFU: Simon Fraser University)
Advancement in assistive technology has led to the commercial availability of multi-dexterous robotic prostheses for the upper extremity. The relatively low performance of the currently used techniques to detect the intention of the user to control such advanced robotic prostheses, however, limits their use. This article explores the use of force myography (FMG) as a potential alternative to the well-established surface electro-myography (sEMG). Specifically, the use of FMG to control different ...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation3.58
Susannah M. Engdahl2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UM: University of Michigan),
Breanne P Christie2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UM: University of Michigan)
+ 3 AuthorsDeanna H. Gates14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UM: University of Michigan)
Background Novel techniques for the control of upper limb prostheses may allow users to operate more complex prostheses than those that are currently available. Because many of these techniques are surgically invasive, it is important to understand whether individuals with upper limb loss would accept the associated risks in order to use a prosthesis.
Published on Nov 30, 2015in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Manfredo Atzori10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland),
Henning Müller42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland)
Hand amputation can dramatically affect the capabilities of a person. Cortical reorganization occurs in the brain, but the motor and somatosensorial cortex can interact with the remnant muscles of the missing hand even many years after the amputation, leading to the possibility to restore the capabilities of hand amputees through myoelectric prostheses. Myoelectric hand prostheses with many degrees of freedom are commercially available and recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that ...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Journal of Neuroscience Methods2.79
Paul F. Pasquina11
Estimated H-index: 11
(USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences),
Melissa Evangelista1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 11 AuthorsJames Vandersea2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract Background Advanced motorized prosthetic devices are currently controlled by EMG signals generated by residual muscles and recorded by surface electrodes on the skin. These surface recordings are often inconsistent and unreliable, leading to high prosthetic abandonment rates for individuals with upper limb amputation. Surface electrodes are limited because of poor skin contact, socket rotation, residual limb sweating, and their ability to only record signals from superficial muscles, wh...
Martina Luchetti9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Andrea Giovanni Cutti17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 2 AuthorsNicolino Rossi11
Estimated H-index: 11
INTRODUCTION Over the past 8 yr, new myoelectrically controlled, multi-articulated hands have become available that allow human-like movements and improved grasping capabilities compared with traditional tridigital (TD) myoelectric devices [1-2]. As such, they can potentially address both functional [3] and cosmetic [4] user needs and have positive psychosocial implications [5-9]. However, the actual impact of these technologies on patients' lives has been documented in only two case reports [10...
Published on Oct 8, 2014in Science Translational Medicine17.16
Max Jair Ortiz-Catalan9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Chalmers University of Technology),
Bo Håkansson28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Chalmers University of Technology),
Rickard Brånemark33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Sahlgrenska University Hospital)
A major challenge since the invention of implantable devices has been a reliable and long-term stable transcutaneous communication. In the case of prosthetic limbs, existing neuromuscular interfaces have been unable to address this challenge and provide direct and intuitive neural control. Although prosthetic hardware and decoding algorithms are readily available, there is still a lack of appropriate and stable physiological signals for controlling the devices. We developed a percutaneous osseoi...
Published on Oct 8, 2014in Science Translational Medicine17.16
Daniel W. Tan3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Case Western Reserve University),
Matthew A. Schiefer11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Case Western Reserve University)
+ 3 AuthorsDustin J. Tyler24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Case Western Reserve University)
Touch perception on the fingers and hand is essential for fine motor control, contributes to our sense of self, allows for effective communication, and aids in our fundamental perception of the world. Despite increasingly sophisticated mechatronics, prosthetic devices still do not directly convey sensation back to their wearers. We show that implanted peripheral nerve interfaces in two human subjects with upper limb amputation provided stable, natural touch sensation in their hands for more than...
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Expert Review of Medical Devices2.21
Jonathon S. Schofield7
Estimated H-index: 7
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Katherine R. Evans4
Estimated H-index: 4
(U of A: University of Alberta)
+ 1 AuthorsJacqueline S. Hebert9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Dexterous hand movement is possible due to closed loop control dependent on efferent motor output and afferent sensory feedback. This control strategy is significantly altered in those with upper limb amputation as sensations of touch and movement are inherently lost. For upper limb prosthetic users, the absence of sensory feedback impedes efficient use of the prosthesis and is highlighted as a major factor contributing to user rejection of myoelectric prostheses. Numerous sensory feedback syste...
Published on Aug 15, 2014in Frontiers in Neurorobotics3.00
Claudio Castellini26
Estimated H-index: 26
(DLR: German Aerospace Center),
Panagiotis K. Artemiadis19
Estimated H-index: 19
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 17 AuthorsKevin B. Englehart6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UNB: University of New Brunswick)
One of the hottest topics in rehabilitation robotics is that of proper control of prosthetic devices. Despite decades of research, the state of the art is dramatically behind the expectations. To shed light on this issue, in June, 2013 the first international workshop on Present and future of non-invasive PNS-Machine Interfaces was convened, hosted by the International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics. The keyword PNS-Machine Interface (PMI) has been selected to denote human-machine interfa...
Published on Feb 5, 2014in Science Translational Medicine17.16
Stanisa Raspopovic13
Estimated H-index: 13
(EPFL: École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne),
Marco Capogrosso11
Estimated H-index: 11
(EPFL: École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)
+ 18 AuthorsSilvestro Micera42
Estimated H-index: 42
(EPFL: École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)
Hand loss is a highly disabling event that markedly affects the quality of life. To achieve a close to natural replacement for the lost hand, the user should be provided with the rich sensations that we naturally perceive when grasping or manipulating an object. Ideal bidirectional hand prostheses should involve both a reliable decoding of the user’s intentions and the delivery of nearly “natural” sensory feedback through remnant afferent pathways, simultaneously and in real time. However, curre...
Cited By58
Newest
Neha Thomas (Johns Hopkins University), Garrett Ung1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Johns Hopkins University)
+ 1 AuthorsJeremy D. Brown6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Johns Hopkins University)
Background Despite the technological advancements in myoelectric prostheses, body-powered prostheses remain a popular choice for amputees, in part due to the natural sensory advantage they provide. Research on haptic feedback in myoelectric prostheses has delivered mixed results. Furthermore, there is limited research comparing various haptic feedback modalities in myoelectric prostheses. In this paper, we present a comparison of the feedback intrinsically present in body-powered prostheses (joi...
Published on Jan 16, 2019in Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation3.58
Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NU: Northwestern University)
Background Pattern recognition technology allows for more intuitive control of myoelectric prostheses. However, the need to collect electromyographic data to initially train the pattern recognition system, and to re-train it during prosthesis use, adds complexity that can make using such a system difficult. Although experienced clinicians may be able to guide users to ensure successful data collection methods, they may not always be available when a user needs to (re)train their device.
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Npg Asia Materials8.05
Min Ku Kim2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Purdue University),
Ramviyas Parasuraman6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UGA: University of Georgia)
+ 6 AuthorsChi Hwan Lee24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Purdue University)
People with hand amputations experience strenuous daily life challenges, often leading to lifelong use of a prosthetic hand(s) and services. Modern advanced prosthetic hands must be able to provide human hand-like sensory perceptions to receive external stimuli during daily activities while simultaneously replicating a realistic appearance and physical properties to naturally integrate in social contexts; however, the practical realization of these issues are impeded by a lack of effective metho...
Published on Apr 27, 2019in Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation3.58
Johnny Parr2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Liverpool Hope University),
Samuel J. Vine19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Exeter)
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Wood12
Estimated H-index: 12
(MMU: Manchester Metropolitan University)
Background Prosthetic hands impose a high cognitive burden on the user that often results in fatigue, frustration and prosthesis rejection. However, efforts to directly measure this burden are sparse and little is known about the mechanisms behind it. There is also a lack of evidence-based training interventions designed to improve prosthesis hand control and reduce the mental effort required to use them. In two experiments, we provide the first direct evaluation of this cognitive burden using m...
Published on Sep 14, 2019in bioRxiv
Carl Beringer (University of Pittsburgh), Misagh Mansouri3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 4 AuthorsRobert A. Gaunt13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Pittsburgh)
Wrist posture impacts the muscle lengths and moment arms of the extrinsic finger muscles that cross the wrist. As a result, the electromyographic (EMG) activity associated with digit movement at different wrist postures may also change. Therefore, we sought to quantify the posture-dependence of extrinsic finger muscle activity. Fine-wire bipolar electrodes were inserted in the extrinsic hand muscles of able-bodied subjects to record EMG activity during wrist and finger movements in various postu...
Published on Sep 8, 2019in bioRxiv
Anton Sobinov1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WVU: West Virginia University),
Matthew T. Boots1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WVU: West Virginia University)
+ 3 AuthorsSergiy Yakovenko15
Estimated H-index: 15
(WVU: West Virginia University)
Computational models of the musculoskeletal system are scientific tools used to study human movement, quantify the effects of injury and disease, and plan surgical interventions. Additionally, these models could also be used to intuitively link biological control signals and realistic high-dimensional articulated prosthetic limbs. However, implementing fast and accurate musculoskeletal computations that can be used to control a prosthetic limb in real-time is a challenging problem. As muscles ty...
Published on 2019in Frontiers in Neurorobotics3.00
Sébastien Mick , Matthieu Lapeyre5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 6 AuthorsAymar de Rugy16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UQ: University of Queensland)
To this day, despite the increasing motor capability of robotic devices, elaborating efficient control strategies is still a key challenge in the field of humanoid robotic arms. In particular, providing a human ``pilot'' with efficient ways to drive such a robotic arm requires thorough testing prior to integration into a finished system. Additionally, when it is needed to preserve anatomical consistency between pilot and robot, such testing requires to employ devices showing human-like features....
View next paperRestoring Natural Sensory Feedback in Real-Time Bidirectional Hand Prostheses