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Gut microbiota in autism and mood disorders

Published on Jan 1, 2016in World Journal of Gastroenterology 3.41
· DOI :10.3748/wjg.v22.i1.361
Francesca Mangiola7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Gianluca Ianiro21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 3 AuthorsAntonio Gasbarrini70
Estimated H-index: 70
(UCSC: Catholic University of the Sacred Heart)
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Abstract
The hypothesis of an important role of gut microbiota in the maintenance of physiological state into the gastrointestinal (GI) system is supported by several studies that have shown a qualitative and quantitative alteration of the intestinal flora in a number of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases. In the last few years, the importance of gut microbiota impairment in the etiopathogenesis of pathology such as autism, dementia and mood disorder, has been raised. The evidence of the inflammatory state alteration, highlighted in disorders such as schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder, strongly recalls the microbiota alteration, highly suggesting an important role of the alteration of GI system also in neuropsychiatric disorders. Up to now, available evidences display that the impairment of gut microbiota plays a key role in the development of autism and mood disorders. The application of therapeutic modulators of gut microbiota to autism and mood disorders has been experienced only in experimental settings to date, with few but promising results. A deeper assessment of the role of gut microbiota in the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as well as the advancement of the therapeutic armamentarium for the modulation of gut microbiota is warranted for a better management of ASD and mood disorders.
  • References (86)
  • Citations (59)
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References86
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care 3.57
Timothy G. Dinan80
Estimated H-index: 80
,
John F. Cryan85
Estimated H-index: 85
Abstract The gut microbiota has become a focus of research for those interested in the brain and behaviour. Here, we profile the gut microbiota in a variety of neuropsychiatric syndromes. Multiple routes of communication between the gut and brain have been established and these include the vagus nerve, immune system, short chain fatty acids and tryptophan. Developmentally, those born by caesarean section have a distinctly different microbiota in early life to those born per vaginum. At the other...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Brain Behavior and Immunity 6.17
Zongxin Ling17
Estimated H-index: 17
(ZJU: Zhejiang University),
Yiwen Cheng8
Estimated H-index: 8
(ZJU: Zhejiang University),
Lanjuan Li48
Estimated H-index: 48
(ZJU: Zhejiang University)
Background: There is growing appreciation for the importance of bacteria in shaping brain development and behaviour. Adolescence and early adulthood are crucial developmental periods during which exposure to harmful environmental factors can have a permanent impact on brain function. Such environmental factors include perturbations of the gut bacteria that may affect gut–brain communication, altering the trajectory of brain development, and increasing vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. Here...
Published on Aug 25, 2015in PeerJ 2.35
Eduardo Castro-Nallar13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Matthew L. Bendall6
Estimated H-index: 6
(GW: George Washington University)
+ 6 AuthorsKeith A. Crandall64
Estimated H-index: 64
(GW: George Washington University)
The role of the human microbiome in schizophrenia remains largely unexplored. The microbiome has been shown to alter brain development and modulate behavior and cognition in animals through gut-brain connections, and research in humans suggests that it may be a modulating factor in many disorders. This study reports findings from a shotgun metagenomic analysis of the oropharyngeal microbiome in 16 individuals with schizophrenia and 16 controls. High-level differences were evident at both the phy...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Brain Behavior and Immunity 6.17
Haiyin Jiang7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ZJU: Zhejiang University),
Zongxin Ling17
Estimated H-index: 17
(ZJU: Zhejiang University)
+ 9 AuthorsJianfei Shi1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract Studies using animal models have shown that depression affects the stability of the microbiota, but the actual structure and composition in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are not well understood. Here, we analyzed fecal samples from 46 patients with depression (29 active-MDD and 17 responded-MDD) and 30 healthy controls (HCs). High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that, according to the Shannon index, increased fecal bacterial α-diversity was found in the active-MDD (A-MD...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Gastroenterology 19.23
Paul Moayyedi81
Estimated H-index: 81
(McMaster University),
Michael G. Surette25
Estimated H-index: 25
(McMaster University)
+ 8 AuthorsWalter Reinisch73
Estimated H-index: 73
(McMaster University)
Background & Aims Ulcerative colitis (UC) is difficult to treat, and standard therapy does not always induce remission. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative approach that induced remission in small series of patients with active UC. We investigated its safety and efficacy in a placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods We performed a parallel study of patients with active UC without infectious diarrhea. Participants were examined by flexible sigmoidoscopy when the study beg...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Gastroenterology 19.23
Noortje Rossen6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Susana Fuentes24
Estimated H-index: 24
(WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)
+ 10 AuthorsW.M. de Vos128
Estimated H-index: 128
(UH: University of Helsinki)
Background & Aims Several case series have reported the effects of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for ulcerative colitis (UC). We assessed the efficacy and safety of FMT for patients with UC in a double-blind randomized trial. Methods Patients with mild to moderately active UC (n = 50) were assigned to groups that underwent FMT with feces from healthy donors or were given autologous fecal microbiota (control); each transplant was administered via nasoduodenal tube at the start of the stu...
Published on May 5, 2015in Annals of Internal Medicine 19.32
Dimitri Drekonja15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Jon Reich2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 5 AuthorsJ Wilt75
Estimated H-index: 75
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Abstract The role of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is not well-known. To assess the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and harms of FMT for CDI. MEDLINE (1980 to January 2015), Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov, followed by hand-searching references from systematic reviews and identified studies. Any study of FMT to treat adult patients with CDI; case reports were only used to report harms. Data were extracted by 1 author and verified b...
Published on May 1, 2015in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 7.73
G. Cammarota46
Estimated H-index: 46
(CUA: The Catholic University of America),
Luca Masucci16
Estimated H-index: 16
(CUA: The Catholic University of America)
+ 5 AuthorsAntonio Gasbarrini70
Estimated H-index: 70
(CUA: The Catholic University of America)
SummaryBackground Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy donors is considered an effective treatment against recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Aim To study the effect of FMT via colonoscopy in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection compared to the standard vancomycin regimen. Methods In an open-label, randomised clinical trial, we assigned subjects with recurrent C. difficile infection to receive: FMT, short regimen of vancomycin (125 mg four times a day for 3 days...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Current Opinion in Biotechnology 8.08
Ruth Ann Luna17
Estimated H-index: 17
(BCM: Baylor College of Medicine),
Jane A. Foster31
Estimated H-index: 31
(St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton)
The human gut microbiome is composed of an enormous number of microorganisms, generally regarded as commensal bacteria. Without this inherent microbial community, we would be unable to digest plant polysaccharides and would have trouble extracting lipids from our diet. Resident gut bacteria are an important contributor to healthy metabolism and there is significant evidence linking gut microbiota and metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. In the past few years, neuroscience research h...
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
Linghong Zhou2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Jane A. Foster31
Estimated H-index: 31
The human intestine houses an astounding number and species of microorganisms, estimated at more than 1014 gut microbiota and composed of over a thousand species. An individual’s profile of microbiota is continually influenced by a variety of factors including but not limited to genetics, age, sex, diet, and lifestyle. Although each person’s microbial profile is distinct, the relative abundance and distribution of bacterial species is similar among healthy individuals, aiding in the maintenance ...
Cited By59
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Scientific Reports 4.01
Aaron J. Stevens3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Otago),
Rachel V. Purcell8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Otago)
+ 3 AuthorsJulia J. Rucklidge27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Cant.: University of Canterbury)
It has been widely hypothesized that both diet and the microbiome play a role in the regulation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) behaviour. However, there has been very limited scientific investigation into the potential biological connection. We performed a 10-week pilot study investigating the effects of a broad spectrum micronutrient administration on faecal microbiome content, using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The study consisted of 17 children (seven in the placebo and ten i...
Published on Feb 28, 2019in Journal of Translational Medicine 4.10
Xiaoquan Huang (Fudan University), Xiaowen Fan (Mount Sinai Hospital)+ 1 AuthorsShiyao Chen9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Fudan University)
Background Gastrointestinal microbiome has drawn an increasing amount of attention over the past decades. There is emerging evidence that the gut flora plays a major role in the pathogenesis of certain diseases. We aimed to analyze the evolution of gastrointestinal microbiome research and evaluate publications qualitatively and quantitatively.
Published in Neurotoxicology 3.26
Lola Rueda-Ruzafa1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Vigo),
Francisco Cruz (University of Vigo)+ -3 AuthorsDiana Cardona11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UAL: University of Almería)
Abstract There are currently various concerns regarding certain environmental toxins and the possible impact they can have on developmental diseases. Glyphosate (Gly) is the most utilised herbicide in agriculture, although its widespread use is generating controversy in the scientific world because of its probable carcinogenic effect on human cells. Gly performs as an inhibitor of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phospate synthase (EPSP synthase), not only in plants, but also in bacteria. An inhibiting ...
Published on Jun 20, 2019in Hepatology 14.97
Runping Liu10
Estimated H-index: 10
(VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University),
Jason D. Kang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University)
+ 14 AuthorsXiaojiaoyang Li9
Estimated H-index: 9
(VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University)
Published on Mar 28, 2019in British Journal of Dermatology 6.71
Claudio Hidalgo-Cantabrana11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council),
Juan Gómez11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 6 AuthorsPablo Coto-Segura15
Estimated H-index: 15
Published on Dec 6, 2018in Developmental Psychobiology 1.85
Atiqah Azhari2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NTU: Nanyang Technological University),
Farouq Azizan (NTU: Nanyang Technological University), Gianluca Esposito20
Estimated H-index: 20
(NTU: Nanyang Technological University)
Published on Jun 25, 2019in Nutrients 4.17
Qing-Yi Lu27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
Anna Rasmussen + 9 AuthorsSusanne M. Henning44
Estimated H-index: 44
Spices were used as food preservatives prior to the advent of refrigeration, suggesting the possibility of effects on microbiota. Previous studies have shown prebiotic activities in animals and in vitro, but there has not been a demonstration of prebiotic or postbiotic effects at culinary doses in humans. In this randomized placebo-controlled study, we determined in twenty-nine healthy adults the effects on the gut microbiota of the consumption daily of capsules containing 5 g of mixed spices at...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Affective Disorders 4.08
Laura Fusar-Poli (University of Catania), Teresa Surace (University of Catania)+ 5 AuthorsEugenio Aguglia19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Catania)
Abstract Background Nutraceuticals are a group of compounds of growing interest for mental health professionals. Given the implication of certain nutrients in the onset of bipolar disorder, it has been hypothesized that nutraceuticals might be effective in improving symptoms of the condition (i.e. mania or depression). Our systematic review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of adjunctive nutraceuticals compared to placebo. Methods We searched the following databases from inception to February ...