Match!

Research funding goes to rich clubs

Published on Dec 1, 2015in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America9.58
· DOI :10.1073/pnas.1520118112
Michael Szell14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NU: Northeastern University),
Roberta Sinatra16
Estimated H-index: 16
(NU: Northeastern University)
Cite
Abstract
Science is an enterprise driven fundamentally by social relations and dynamics (1). Thanks to comprehensive bibliometric datasets on scientific production and the development of new tools in network science in the past decade, traces of these relations can now be analyzed in the form of citation and coauthorship networks, shedding light on the complex structure of scientific collaboration patterns (2, 3), on reputation effects (4), and even on the development of entire fields (5, 6). What about funding, however? How do the available funding options influence with whom we collaborate? Are there elite institutions that get more than others? Additionally, how is the funding landscape changing? In PNAS, Ma et al. (7) explore a dataset of 43,000 projects funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, a major government body of research funding in the United Kingdom, offering a unique perspective on these questions. In a longitudinal data analysis covering three decades, Ma et al. (7) shed light into the relations between funding landscapes and scientific collaborations. The study finds increasing inequality over time on two levels: First, an elite circle of academic institutions tends to overattract funding, and, second, the very same institutions prefer to collaborate with each other.
  • References (17)
  • Citations (9)
Cite
References17
Newest
Athen Ma10
Estimated H-index: 10
(QMUL: Queen Mary University of London),
Raul J. Mondragon11
Estimated H-index: 11
(QMUL: Queen Mary University of London),
Vito Latora54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of Catania)
Seeking research funding is an essential part of academic life. Funded projects are primarily collaborative in nature through internal and external partnerships, but what role does funding play in the formulation of these partnerships? Here, by examining over 43,000 scientific projects funded over the past three decades by one of the major government research agencies in the world, we characterize how the funding landscape has changed and its impacts on the underlying collaboration networks acro...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Nature Physics20.11
Roberta Sinatra16
Estimated H-index: 16
(NU: Northeastern University),
Pierre Deville6
Estimated H-index: 6
(NU: Northeastern University)
+ 2 AuthorsAlbert-La szlo Baraba si115
Estimated H-index: 115
(NU: Northeastern University)
An analysis of Web of Science data spanning more than 100 years reveals the rapid growth and increasing multidisciplinarity of physics — as well its internal map of subdisciplines.
Published on May 1, 2015in Scientific Reports4.01
Pierre Deville6
Estimated H-index: 6
(NU: Northeastern University),
Dashun Wang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NU: Northeastern University)
+ 3 AuthorsAlbert-La szlo Baraba si115
Estimated H-index: 115
(NU: Northeastern University)
Changing institutions is an integral part of an academic life. Yet little is known about the mobility patterns of scientists at an institutional level and how these career choices affect scientific outcomes. Here, we examine over 420,000 papers, to track the affiliation information of individual scientists, allowing us to reconstruct their career trajectories over decades. We find that career movements are not only temporally and spatially localized, but also characterized by a high degree of st...
Published on Apr 24, 2015in Science41.04
Danielle Li7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Harvard University),
Leila Agha4
Estimated H-index: 4
(BU: Boston University)
This paper examines the success of peer-review panels in predicting the future quality of proposed research. We construct new data to track publication, citation, and patenting outcomes associated with more than 130,000 research project (R01) grants funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health from 1980 to 2008. We find that better peer-review scores are consistently associated with better research outcomes and that this relationship persists even when we include detailed controls for an inv...
Published on Mar 4, 2015in PLOS ONE2.78
Ted von Hippel7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach),
Courtney von Hippel17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UQ: University of Queensland)
We surveyed 113 astronomers and 82 psychologists active in applying for federally funded research on their grant-writing history between January, 2009 and November, 2012. We collected demographic data, effort levels, success rates, and perceived non-financial benefits from writing grant proposals. We find that the average proposal takes 116 PI hours and 55 CI hours to write; although time spent writing was not related to whether the grant was funded. Effort did translate into success, however, a...
Published on Feb 1, 2015in Science Advances
Aaron Clauset29
Estimated H-index: 29
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder),
Samuel Arbesman9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation),
Daniel B. Larremore14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Harvard University)
The faculty job market plays a fundamental role in shaping research priorities, educational outcomes, and career trajectories among scientists and institutions. However, a quantitative understanding of faculty hiring as a system is lacking. Using a simple technique to extract the institutional prestige ranking that best explains an observed faculty hiring network—who hires whose graduates as faculty—we present and analyze comprehensive placement data on nearly 19,000 regular faculty in three dis...
Published on Nov 21, 2014in Physical Review X12.21
Tobias Kuhn17
Estimated H-index: 17
(ETH Zurich),
Matjaz Perc74
Estimated H-index: 74
(University of Maribor),
Dirk Helbing78
Estimated H-index: 78
(ETH Zurich)
Memes are the cultural equivalent of genes that spread across human culture by means of imitation. What makes a meme and what distinguishes it from other forms of information, however, is still poorly understood. Our analysis of memes in the scientific literature reveals that they are governed by a surprisingly simple relationship between frequency of occurrence and the degree to which they propagate along the citation graph. We propose a simple formalization of this pattern and validate it with...
Alexander M. Petersen22
Estimated H-index: 22
(IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca),
Santo Fortunato10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Aalto University)
+ 6 AuthorsNicola Carmine Salerno30
Estimated H-index: 30
(BU: Boston University)
Reputation is an important social construct in science, which enables informed quality assessments of both publications and careers of scientists in the absence of complete systemic information. However, the relation between reputation and career growth of an individual remains poorly understood, despite recent proliferation of quantitative research evaluation methods. Here, we develop an original framework for measuring how a publication’s citation rate Δc depends on the reputation of its centr...
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Dialogues in clinical neuroscience4.87
Olaf Sporns78
Estimated H-index: 78
An increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies approach the function of the human brain from a network perspective. The analysis of brain networks is made feasible by the development of new imaging acquisition methods as well as new tools from graph theory and dynamical systems. This review surveys some of these methodological advances and summarizes recent findings on the architecture of structural and functional brain networks. Studies of the structural connectome reveal several mod...
Published on Sep 15, 2010in Science Translational Medicine17.16
Katy Börner32
Estimated H-index: 32
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington),
Noshir Contractor36
Estimated H-index: 36
+ 7 AuthorsBrian Uzzi34
Estimated H-index: 34
This Commentary describes recent research progress and professional developments in the study of scientific teamwork, an area of inquiry termed the “science of team science” (SciTS, pronounced “sahyts”). It proposes a systems perspective that incorporates a mixed-methods approach to SciTS that is commensurate with the conceptual, methodological, and translational complexities addressed within the SciTS field. The theoretically grounded and practically useful framework is intended to integrate ex...
Cited By9
Newest
Agnieszka Geras , Grzegorz Siudem2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Marek Gagolewski7
Estimated H-index: 7
(PAN: Polish Academy of Sciences)
Published on Feb 23, 2019in Journal of Complex Networks
Matteo Cinelli (IPN: Instituto Politécnico Nacional)
Rich-club ordering refers to tendency of nodes with a high degree to be more interconnected than expected. In this paper we consider the concept of rich-club ordering when generalized to structural measures different from the node degree and to non-structural measures (i.e. to node metadata). The differences in considering rich-club ordering (RCO) with respect to both structural and non-structural measures is then discussed in terms of employed coefficients and of appropriate null models (link r...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in arXiv: Physics and Society
Federico Battiston9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CEU: Central European University),
Federico Battiston (CEU: Central European University)+ 3 AuthorsRoberta Sinatra16
Estimated H-index: 16
Over the past decades, the diversity of areas explored by physicists has exploded, encompassing new topics from biophysics and chemical physics to network science. However, it is unclear how these new subfields emerged from the traditional subject areas and how physicists explore them. To map out the evolution of physics subfields, here, we take an intellectual census of physics by studying physicists’ careers. We use a large-scale publication data set, identify the subfields of 135,877 physicis...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Journal of Informetrics3.88
Dengsheng Wu (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences), Lili Yuan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsJianping Li (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The inequality in research funding is an important issue, in which the measurement of inequality is the basis. The literature has mostly investigated the inequality in research funding by providing overall values of inequality but has rarely explored this topic through the internal structure of the overall inequality. In this paper, a three-stage nested Theil index is employed to decompose the overall inequality in research funding into the between and within components. Moreover, a dec...
Published on Dec 29, 2017
Linton Winder4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Simon Hodge9
Estimated H-index: 9
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Physics Reports28.30
An Zeng17
Estimated H-index: 17
(BNU: Beijing Normal University),
Zhesi Shen2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsH. Eugenestanley114
Estimated H-index: 114
(BU: Boston University)
Abstract The science of science (SOS) is a rapidly developing field which aims to understand, quantify and predict scientific research and the resulting outcomes. The problem is essentially related to almost all scientific disciplines and thus has attracted attention of scholars from different backgrounds. Progress on SOS will lead to better solutions for many challenging issues, ranging from the selection of candidate faculty members by a university to the development of research fields to whic...
Published on Jul 1, 2017 in CCC (Chinese Control Conference)
Xueguang Yang (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China), Zhihai Rong5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Electronic Science and Technology of China),
Chao Fan (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China)
In modern research the innovation is easy to appear in the multidisciplinary investigation. Understanding the interaction among related scientific research fields is an important problem. In this paper, we analyze the paper data published in IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control (TAC) during the past half century, and construct a field network to disclose the evolution of research fields in IEEE Control Systems Society. We find that the distribution of number of papers per field is heterogeneou...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Scientometrics2.77
Jianping LiXiaolei19
Estimated H-index: 19
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Yongjia Xie4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsYuanping Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Research funding is a significant support for the development of scientific research. The inequality of research funding is an intrinsic feature of science, and policy makers have realized the over-concentration of funding allocation. Previous studies have tried to use the Gini coefficient to measure this inequality; however, the phenomena of multiple funding sources and funding subdivision have not been deeply discussed and empirically studied due to limitations on data availability. This paper...
Published on May 1, 2017in Journal of Informetrics3.88
Yian Yin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University),
Dashun Wang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NU: Northwestern University)
A central question in science of science concerns how time affects citations. Despite the long-standing interests and its broad impact, we lack systematic answers to this simple yet fundamental question. By reviewing and classifying prior studies for the past 50 years, we find a significant lack of consensus in the literature, primarily due to the coexistence of retrospective and prospective approaches to measuring citation age distributions. These two approaches have been pursued in parallel, l...