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Can resistance training change the strength, body composition and self-concept of overweight and obese adolescent males? A randomised controlled trial

Published on Oct 1, 2014in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
· DOI :10.1136/bjsports-2013-092209
Natasha Schranz9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UniSA: University of South Australia),
Grant R. Tomkinson20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UniSA: University of South Australia)
+ 2 AuthorsTim Olds48
Estimated H-index: 48
(UniSA: University of South Australia)
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Abstract
Background/aim Resistance training is an exercise modality at which overweight and obese adolescents can excel and which can therefore positively affect their psychological well-being. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a 6-month resistance training intervention on the self-concept strength and body composition of overweight and obese adolescent males. Methods 56 overweight and obese males aged 13–17 years were randomly allocated to an Intervention (n=30) or Control (n=26) group. Primary (psychological) and secondary (strength and body composition) outcomes were assessed at baseline as well as at 3 (halfway through the intervention), 6 (immediately postintervention) and 12 months follow-up. Random effects mixed modelling was used to determine the effects of the intervention. Results Statistically significant differences between the Intervention and Control groups were observed at 3-month and 6-month assessments for exercise self-efficacy, resistance training confidence and self-esteem. Large increases in strength for the Intervention group, relative to Controls, were also observed with no substantial changes in body composition shown for either group. Values for all variables returned to baseline following completion of the programme. Conclusions A 6-month resistance training intervention can positively affect the self-concept and strength of overweight and obese adolescent boys.
  • References (43)
  • Citations (17)
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References43
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2012in Diabetes 7.20
SoJung Lee34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Pittsburgh),
Fida Bacha31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 3 AuthorsSilva Arslanian62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Pittsburgh)
The optimal exercise modality for reductions of abdominal obesity and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth is unknown. We examined the effects of aerobic exercise (AE) versus resistance exercise (RE) without caloric restriction on abdominal adiposity, ectopic fat, and insulin sensitivity and secretion in youth. Forty-five obese adolescent boys were randomly assigned to one of three 3-month interventions: AE, RE, or a nonexercising control. Abdominal fat was assessed by magnetic resonance im...
138 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Pediatric Obesity 3.71
Philip J. Morgan49
Estimated H-index: 49
(University of Newcastle),
Kristen L. Saunders6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Newcastle),
David R. Lubans43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Newcastle)
Summary Objectives To evaluate the effect of a school-based obesity prevention programme on physical self-perception and key physical-activity related cognitions in adolescent boys from disadvantaged secondary schools. A secondary objective was to determine if any psychological changes were associated with improved weight status. Methods Participants (n = 100, age = 14.3[0.6]) were randomized to the PALS (Physical Activity Leaders) intervention (n = 50) or a control group (n = 50) and assessed a...
25 Citations Source Cite
Ivana Stankov3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UniSA: University of South Australia),
Tim Olds48
Estimated H-index: 48
(UniSA: University of South Australia),
Margaret Cargo25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UniSA: University of South Australia)
A systematic review of qualitative studies was undertaken to understand the barriers to physical activity experienced by adolescents who were overweight or obese. From a search of electronic databases and ‘grey’ literature, published between 1950 and 2009, 15 studies met the inclusion criteria. Bronfenbrenner’s model of human development provided an ecological lens for identifying and synthesising barriers to physical activity. Two reviewers appraised study quality. Miles and Huberman’s cross-ca...
48 Citations Source Cite
Derek D. Rucker36
Estimated H-index: 36
(NU: Northwestern University),
Kristopher J. Preacher35
Estimated H-index: 35
(KU: University of Kansas)
+ 1 AuthorsRichard E. Petty92
Estimated H-index: 92
(OSU: Ohio State University)
A key aim of social psychology is to understand the psychological processes through which independent variables affect dependent variables in the social domain. This objective has given rise to statistical methods for mediation analysis. In mediation analysis, the significance of the relationship between the independent and dependent variables has been integral in theory testing, being used as a basis to determine (1) whether to proceed with analyses of mediation and (2) whether one or several p...
916 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2011in Journal of Sports Sciences 2.81
David R. Lubans43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Newcastle),
Philip J. Morgan49
Estimated H-index: 49
(University of Newcastle)
+ 4 AuthorsC. Smith4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Newcastle)
Abstract The main aim of this study was to determine the test–retest reliability of existing tests of health-related fitness. Participants (mean age 14.8 years, s = 0.4) were 42 boys and 26 girls who completed the study assessments on two occasions separated by one week. The following tests were conducted: bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) to calculate percent body fat, leg dynamometer, 90° push-up, 7-stage sit-up, and wall squat tests. Intra-class correlation (ICC), paired samples t-tests,...
37 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2010in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 4.48
Gert Jan Van Der Heijden2
Estimated H-index: 2
(BCM: Baylor College of Medicine),
Zhiyue J. Wang32
Estimated H-index: 32
+ 4 AuthorsAgneta L. Sunehag24
Estimated H-index: 24
(BCM: Baylor College of Medicine)
Introduction: Data on the metabolic effects of resistance exercise (strength training) in adolescents are limited. Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine whether a controlled resistance exercise program without dietary intervention or weight loss reduces body fat accumulation, increases lean body mass, and improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in sedentary obese Hispanic adolescents. Methods: Twelve obese adolescents (age = 15.5 ± 0.5 yr, body mass index = 35.3 ± 0.8...
96 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2010in Psychology of Sport and Exercise 2.71
David R. Lubans43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Newcastle),
Elroy J. Aguiar10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Newcastle),
Robin Callister43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Newcastle)
Abstract Objectives While it has been suggested that resistance training may have a beneficial effect on psychological health in young people, evidence supporting this assertion is limited. The primary aim of this study was to explore the effect of free weights and elastic tubing resistance training on physical self-perception in adolescents. Design Randomized controlled trial. Method Participants ( N = 108, mean age = 14.96 ± .68 years) were randomized to free weights ( n = 37) or elastic tubin...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 20, 2010
Yoon-Myung Kim1
Estimated H-index: 1
BACKGROUD: Abdominal obesity is a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and insulin resistance. Currently, the role of regular exercise alone in the treatment of abdominal obesity is unknown in adolescent boys.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a 3-month regular exercise alone without calorie restriction on total and abdominal adiposity in overweight adolescent boys. More specifically, the effects of different types of exercise training (aerobic vs. resis...
2 Citations
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness 0.79
Patrick W.C. Lau13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Hong Kong Baptist University),
Zhaowei Kong8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UM: University of Macau)
+ 4 AuthorsBeeto W.C. Leung2
Estimated H-index: 2
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term resistance training program on serum leptin concentrations in obese adolescents. Eighteen Chinese obese adolescents participated in the supervised weight management program. Resistance training was conducted three times a week on alternate days for 6 weeks. Body composition [body fat mass (FM) and body lean mass (LM)] determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, muscle strength and leptin, insulin and glucose were measured b...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2010in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 3.02
Amelia Velez1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Devon L. Golem6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Shawn M. Arent17
Estimated H-index: 17
Current evidence suggests that a resistance training program may be physically and psychologically beneficial for adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a structured resistance training program on strength, body composition, and self-concept in normal and overweight Hispanic adolescents. Male and female participants (n = 28; 16.1 ± 0.2 y; 164.5 ± 1.4 cm; 63.3 ± 2.5 kg; 20.0 ± 1.7% body fat [BF]) were recruited from a predominantly Hispanic high school. Prior to the ...
56 Citations Source Cite
Cited By17
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Sports Medicine - Open
Helen Collins (Edin.: University of Edinburgh), Josephine N. Booth8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
+ 2 AuthorsAilsa Niven10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
Background There is growing evidence that physical activity (PA) is beneficial for the mental health of young people. One area that has been widely examined is the impact of PA on ‘the self’, which is a term that encompasses a range of specific and related terms (e.g. self-esteem, self-efficacy, self-perceptions). There is evidence that PA is strongly associated with ‘the self’ in childhood and beyond. However, the impact of the specific PA of resistance training (RT) is not yet clear. The purpo...
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Published on May 1, 2019in Physical Therapy 3.04
Margarita D. Tsiros9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UniSA: University of South Australia),
Sarah P. Schultz14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Massey University)
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Published on Jan 1, 2019
Rebecca Robinson (Royal Hallamshire Hospital)
This chapter outlines common sports injuries in an adolescent and young adult (AYA) population as well as the presentation, investigation and management of common musculoskeletal injury patterns. The concepts of overuse injury and relative energy deficiency syndrome are explored to enable healthcare professionals to identify risk factors for the sporting AYA.
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Sports Medicine - Open
Helen Collins (Edin.: University of Edinburgh), Samantha Fawkner2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsAudrey Duncan (Dund.: University of Dundee)
Background There has been a rise in research into obesity prevention and treatment programmes in youth, including the effectiveness of resistance-based exercise. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine the effect of resistance training interventions on weight status in youth.
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Published on Oct 1, 2018in Mental Health and Physical Activity 1.80
Jordan J. Smith15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Newcastle),
Mark R. Beauchamp24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
+ 3 AuthorsDavid R. Lubans43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Newcastle)
Abstract Objective To examine the impact of a school-based physical activity intervention on adolescents' self-esteem and subjective well-being, and to explore moderators and mediators of intervention effects. Methods Resistance Training for Teens was evaluated using a cluster RCT in 16 schools located in New South Wales, Australia. Adolescents ( N = 508; 14.1 ± 0.5 years; 49.6% female) completed measures of global self-esteem, subjective well-being, and hypothesized mediators (i.e., perceived f...
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Published on Aug 8, 2018in Sustainability 2.59
Diana Amado-Alonso2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Santiago Mendo-Lázaro3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 2 AuthorsDamián Iglesias-Gallego3
Estimated H-index: 3
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 28, 2018in American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
Kirsten Legerlotz2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Humboldt University of Berlin)
Many parents still hesitate to encourage their children to participate in resistance training programs. This is unfortunate since recent research shows that resistance training can positively affect children’s health. This narrative review aims to present an overview of the health-associated effects resistance training can provide particularly in children and adolescents with disabilities by describing its effects on muscle strength, physical function, mental health, self-concept, obesity, and i...
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Published on Oct 1, 2017in Sports Medicine 7.58
Gill A. ten Hoor5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UM: Maastricht University),
Gerjo Kok55
Estimated H-index: 55
(UM: Maastricht University)
+ 3 AuthorsGuy Plasqui21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UM: Maastricht University)
Background Overweightness and obesity represent a high burden on well-being and society. Strength training has positive effects on body composition and metabolic health for people who are overweight or obese. The evidence for psychological effects of strength exercises is unclear.
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 22, 2017in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 7.75
Lena Al-Khudairy8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Warw.: University of Warwick),
Emma Loveman29
Estimated H-index: 29
+ 11 AuthorsClaire O'Malley9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Durham University)
Background Adolescent overweight and obesity has increased globally, and can be associated with short- and long-term health consequences. Modifying known dietary and behavioural risk factors through behaviour changing interventions (BCI) may help to reduce childhood overweight and obesity. This is an update of a review published in 2009. Objectives To assess the effects of diet, physical activity and behavioural interventions for the treatment of overweight or obese adolescents aged 12 to 17 yea...
33 Citations Source Cite