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Intoxication with bourbon versus vodka: effects on hangover, sleep, and next-day neurocognitive performance in young adults.

Published on Mar 1, 2010in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 3.18
· DOI :10.1111/j.1530-0277.2009.01116.x
Damaris J. Rohsenow57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Brown University),
Jonathan Howland29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Boston University)
+ 5 AuthorsSuzanne D. Sales6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Brown University)
Abstract
Background: This study assessed the effects of heavy drinking with high or low congener beverages on next-day neurocognitive performance, and the extent to which these effects were mediated by alcohol-related sleep disturbance or alcoholic beverage congeners, and correlated with the intensity of hangover. Methods: Healthy heavy drinkers age 21 to 33 (n = 95) participated in 2 drinking nights after an acclimatization night. They drank to a mean of 0.11 g% breath alcohol concentration on vodka or bourbon one night with matched placebo the other night, randomized for type and order. Polysomnography recordings were made overnight; self-report and neurocognitive measures were assessed the next morning. Results: After alcohol, people had more hangover and more decrements in tests requiring both sustained attention and speed. Hangover correlated with poorer performance on these measures. Alcohol decreased sleep efficiency and rapid eye movement sleep, and increased wake time and next-day sleepiness. Alcohol effects on sleep correlated with hangover but did not mediate the effects on performance. No effect of beverage congeners was found except on hangover severity, with people feeling worse after bourbon. Virtually no sex differences appeared. Conclusions: As drinking to this level affects complex cognitive abilities, safety could be affected, with implications for driving and for safety-sensitive occupations. Congener content affects only how people feel the next day so does not increase risk. The sleep disrupting effects of alcohol did not account for the impaired performance so other mechanisms of effect need to be sought. As hangover symptoms correlate with impaired performance, these might be contributing to the impairment.
  • References (65)
  • Citations (40)
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References65
Published on Jan 4, 1997in BMJ 23.56
Ian Calder2
Estimated H-index: 2
“Wine is only sweet to happy men,” wrote an unhappy John Keats to his sweetheart.1 His observation seems to have been vindicated. Harburg et al found that psychosocial factors such as guilt about drinking, a neurotic personality, becoming angry or depressed while drinking, and having suffered “negative life events” in the past 12 months are better predictors of symptoms of hangover than the amount of ethanol drunk.2 In fact, ethanol itself may play only a minor part in producing the thirst, head...
12 Citations Source Cite
Joy L. Taylor28
Estimated H-index: 28
,
Nancy Dolhert5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 2 AuthorsJerome A. Yesavage61
Estimated H-index: 61
OBJECTIVES: In this preliminary study of alcohol effects on aviators' flight simulator performance, we addressed some methodological issues regarding possible gender-related differences in response to alcohol. METHODS: Subjects were 11 male and 12 female general aviation pilots, ages 21-40. Subjects received 8 h of training before they were tested with alcohol. On the alcohol test day they were tested before drinking, while intoxicated (target BAC of 0.08%), and 8 h after drinking. RESULTS: The ...
59 Citations
Published on Jun 1, 1966in Quarterly journal of studies on alcohol
Murphree Hb1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Price Lm1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Greenberg La1
Estimated H-index: 1
14 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 1983
Barbara G. Tabachnick24
Estimated H-index: 24
,
Linda S. Fidell11
Estimated H-index: 11
In this Section: 1. Brief Table of Contents 2. Full Table of Contents 1. BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 A Guide to Statistical Techniques: Using the Book Chapter 3 Review of Univariate and Bivariate Statistics Chapter 4 Cleaning Up Your Act: Screening Data Prior to Analysis Chapter 5 Multiple Regression Chapter 6 Analysis of Covariance Chapter 7 Multivariate Analysis of Variance and Covariance Chapter 8 Profile Analysis: The Multivariate Approach to Repeated Measures Ch...
41.4k Citations
Daniel G. Morrow39
Estimated H-index: 39
,
Jerome A. Yesavage61
Estimated H-index: 61
+ 3 AuthorsJared R. Tinklenberg45
Estimated H-index: 45
This study examined the time-course of alcohol impairment of general aviation pilot simulator performance. We tested 14 young (mean age 25.8 years) and 14 older (mean age 37.9 years) pilots in a Frasca 141 simulator during alcohol and placebo conditions. In the alcohol condition, pilots drank alcohol and were tested after reaching 0.10% BAL, and then 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 h after they had stopped drinking. They were tested at the same times in the placebo condition. Alcohol impaired overall perfor...
23 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 1991
Jan Törnros7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Hans Laurell5
Estimated H-index: 5
The aim was to study hang-over effects from alcohol in simulated driving. The driving task was to negotiate 20 km in as short time as possible. The road had many curves, horizontal and vertical, with ice friction at irregular on at irregular intervals. 24 healthy volunteers, aged 22-46, with valid driving licenses, all screened as moderate drinkers, participated as subjects in a repeated measurements design. In the acute intoxicated state (average BAC 150 mg%), driving performance was severely i...
46 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 1998in Alcohol health and research world
Robert M. Swift51
Estimated H-index: 51
,
Dena Davidson18
Estimated H-index: 18
Hangovers are a frequent, though unpleasant, experience among people who drink to intoxication. Despite the prevalence of hangovers, however, this condition is not well understood scientifically. Multiple possible contributors to the hangover state have been investigated, and researchers have produced evidence that alcohol can directly promote hangover symptoms through its effects on urine production, the gastrointestinal tract, blood sugar concentrations, sleep patterns, and biological rhythms....
93 Citations
Published on Apr 1, 1998in Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 3.20
Toshio Kobayashi8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Kiwamu Misaki7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 6 AuthorsHidemichi Fukuda2
Estimated H-index: 2
The influence of alcohol (ethanol) on sleep was investigated in 10 men. Polysomnography (PS) was recorded on a baseline night (BL-N) and an ethanol (0.8 g/kg) night (Et-N). On visual score rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was reduced, REM latency was prolonged on Et-N as compared to BL-N. Using the fast Fourier transformation method, electroencephalographic power density of REM sleep in δ frequencies band and in the 10–12 Hz range of non-REM sleep were enhanced. REM sleep and non-RJEM sleep change...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2006in Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 2.62
L. Darren Kruisselbrink5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Acadia University),
Katrina L. Martin1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsRené J.L. Murphy12
Estimated H-index: 12
Objective: Individuals in society typically consume alcohol in “standard” units (e.g., bottles/cans of beer, glasses of wine, shots of distilled spirits) over a reasonable period of time whereas in many hangover studies, participants consume a single large dose of alcohol relative to their body weight in a short period of time. The purpose of this study was to examine how consuming low to moderate “standard” quantities of alcohol over an evening affected subjective hangover ratings, physical, ph...
28 Citations Source Cite
Cited By40
Published on May 1, 2014
The purpose of the current thesis was twofold: 1) to review the literature while linking the prolonged effects of excessive acute alcohol consumption (hangover) to decrements in complex vigilance tasks and 2) to determine if the prolonged effects of excessive acute alcohol consumption have an affect on driving a motor vehicle. Driving involves great requirements for attention, vigilance, and motor control. It has been previously demonstrated that alcohol, while in the body, or recently removed d...
Published on Mar 10, 2010in Addiction 6.05
Jonathan Howland29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Boston University),
Damaris J. Rohsenow57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Brown University)
+ 7 AuthorsJohn A. Hermos24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Boston University)
Aim To assess the effects of binge drinking on students' next‐day academic test‐taking performance. Design A placebo‐controlled cross‐over design with randomly assigned order of conditions. Participants were randomized to either alcoholic beverage [mean = 0.12 g% breath alcohol concentration (BrAC)] or placebo on the first night and then received the other beverage a week later. The next day, participants were assessed on test‐taking, neurocognitive performance and mood state. Participants A tot...
39 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 18, 2013
Charles Greener (Miami University)
Background : Alcohol is related to many intoxicated behaviors; some are perceived as good (e.g., being more social), but some can be harmful (e.g., increased aggression and sexual aggression). Is consuming certain alcoholic beverages related to alcohol-related negative consequences? College students experience a number of negative consequences that have social, academic, and personal impacts 16 . About 37% of white males under the age of 30 and 45% of white females under the age of 30 drink pred...
Published on Oct 1, 2014
Maura Daley Fawcett (Miami University)
Alcohol abuse and hangovers decrease next day productivity and well-being. According to the Hangover Symptoms Scale (HSS), hangover symptoms include nausea, headache, and extreme thirst/dehydration. 1 These symptoms start to occur as blood alcohol levels decline, and peak as all the alcohol is removed from the system. 1 Generally, it is believed that the greater the amount and duration of alcohol consumption, the more prevalent the hangover. 2 Alcohol with a dark color, and higher congener conte...
Adele McKinney9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Ulster University),
Kieran Coyle7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Ulster University),
Joris Cornelis Verster36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Utrecht University)
Objective The aimof this study was to compare performance measures after acute alcohol consumption (intoxication) with the performance the day after a normal nightâ?Ts drinking (hangover). Methods Eighty-four social drinkers took part in two studies that followed a counterbalanced repeated measure design. Fifteen men and 33 women were tested the morning (09:00, 11:00 or 13:00 h) following normal/usual alcohol consumption and the morning after no alcohol consumption; the order of testing was coun...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 3.18
Brandon M. Robertson3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Thomas M. Piasecki12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 4 AuthorsAndrew C. Heath37
Estimated H-index: 37
Background: The Hangover Symptoms Scale (HSS) assesses the frequency of 13 symptoms experienced after drinking in the past year. Cross-sectional analyses in college drinkers showed preliminary evidence for the validity of the HSS (Slutske et al., 2003). The current investigation extended this work by examining the construct validity of the HSS in an ecological momentary assessment investigation. Methods: Frequent drinkers (N = 404) carried electronic diaries to track their daily experiences over...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2011in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 3.18
J. Todd Arnedt28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Michigan),
Damaris J. Rohsenow57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Brown University)
+ 4 AuthorsJonathan Howland29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Boston University)
Background: This study evaluated sex and family history of alcoholism as moderators of subjective ratings of sleepiness/sleep quality and polysomnography (PSG) following alcohol intoxication in healthy, young adults. Methods: Ninety-three healthy adults [mean age 24.4 ± 2.7 years, 59 women, 29 subjects with a positive family history of alcoholism (FH+)] were recruited. After screening PSG, participants consumed alcohol (sex/weight adjusted dosing) to intoxication [peak breath alcohol concentrati...
32 Citations Source Cite
Adele McKinney9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Ulster University),
Kieran Coyle7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Ulster University)
+ 1 AuthorsJoris Cornelis Verster36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Utrecht University)
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the next day effects of alcohol consumption on a range of attention tasks. METHODS: The study followed a counterbalanced repeated measure design, with participants tested the morning following normal/usual alcohol consumption and again the morning after no alcohol consumption. Participants were 48 social drinkers (15 men and 33 women), who performed attention tests at 9 am, 11 am, or 1 pm. Performance was assessed by tasks measuring sustained atte...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 3.18
Ted R. Miller63
Estimated H-index: 63
(Pacific Institute),
Rebecca Shannon Spicer18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Pacific Institute)
Background: Primary data collection has established that alcohol causes injuries treated in the emergency department. No comparable data exist for injuries admitted to hospital. Data on the injury risks of heavy drinkers relative to other drinkers also are sparse. Methods: We estimated (i) whether regular heavy drinkers have higher hospitalized injury risks than other people when alcohol-negative and (ii) how much hospitalized injury risk of regular heavy drinkers and other drinkers rises when a...
17 Citations Source Cite