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Walking trends among U.S. adults: the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 1987-2000.

Published on Aug 1, 2003in American Journal of Preventive Medicine4.43
· DOI :10.1016/S0749-3797(03)00112-0
Mary Ellen Simpson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention),
Mary K. Serdula70
Estimated H-index: 70
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
+ 4 AuthorsKarin A. Mack30
Estimated H-index: 30
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Abstract
Abstract Objective To examine trends in walking among adults in 31 states. Methods Trends by sociodemographic strata were analyzed from respondents who participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Results The prevalence of walking among men increased 3.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]=2.4–5.2), from 26.2% (95% CI=25.1–25.3) in 1987 to 30.1% (95% CI=29.4–30.8) in 2000. In women, walking increased 6.6% (95% CI=5.4–7.8), from 40.4% (95% CI=–39.4–41.1) to 46.9% (95% CI=46.2–47.6) during the same time period. However, the prevalence of walking three times a week for 30 minutes duration remained constant across all years. The largest increases occurred in minority subpopulations: 8.7% (95% CI=3.2–14.2) in Hispanic women, 8.5% (95% CI=4.4–12.6) non–Hispanic black women, and 7.0% (95% CI=2.3–11.7) in non–Hispanic black men. Walking was the most frequently reported activity among adults who met the national recommendations for regular physical activity (defined as five or more times a week for ≥30 minutes per session). Conclusions Given the acceptability of walking across all sociodemographic subgroups, efforts to increase the frequency of walking could markedly increase the percentage of U.S. adults who engage in regular physical activity, a national priority identified in the Healthy People 2010 objectives for the nation.
  • References (7)
  • Citations (196)
References7
Newest
#1Carlos J. Crespo (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 1
#2Steven J. Keteyian (HFHS: Henry Ford Health System)H-Index: 18
Last.Christopher T. Sempos (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 58
view all 4 authors...
Cited By196
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#1Josephine A. Menkin (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 2
#2Heather McCreath (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
Last.Sina MaH-Index: 1
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#1Patricia A. Thomas (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Amy C. Lodge (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 5
Last.Corinne Reczek (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 13
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#1Joseph C. Engeda (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 2
#2Katelyn M. Holliday (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
Last.Pamela J. Schreiner (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 58
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#1Samuel Ofei-Dodoo (WSU: Wichita State University)H-Index: 3
#2Nicole L. Rogers (WSU: Wichita State University)H-Index: 10
Last.Michael E. Rogers (WSU: Wichita State University)H-Index: 15
view all 6 authors...
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