Match!

By 4.5 Months, Linguistic Experience Already Affects Infants’ Talker Processing Abilities

Published on Sep 1, 2019in Child Development5.024
· DOI :10.1111/cdev.13280
Natalie Fecher3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Elizabeth K. Johnson33
Estimated H-index: 33
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Sources
Abstract
Contemporary models of adult speech perception acknowledge that the processing of linguistic and nonlinguistic aspects of the speech signal are interdependent. But when in development does this interdependence first emerge? In the adult literature, one way to demonstrate this relationship has been to examine how language experience affects talker identification. Thus, in this study, 4- to 5-month-old infants (N = 96) were tested on their ability to tell apart talkers in a familiar language (English) compared to unfamiliar languages (Polish or Spanish). Infants readily distinguished between talkers in the familiar language but not in the unfamiliar languages, supporting the hypothesis that the integrated processing of linguistic and nonlinguistic information in speech is early emerging and robust. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
  • References (52)
  • Citations (0)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
1 Citations
5 Citations
211 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References52
Newest
#1Natalie Fecher (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2Melissa Paquette-Smith (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 4
Last. Elizabeth K. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Natalie Fecher (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2Elizabeth K. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 33
2 CitationsSource
#1Natalie Fecher (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2Elizabeth K. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 33
4 CitationsSource
#1Kalim GonzalesH-Index: 2
#2LouAnn Gerken (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 34
Last. Rebecca L. Gómez (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 26
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Human vocalizations contain both voice characteristics that convey who is talking and sophisticated linguistic structure. Inter-talker variation in voice characteristics is traditionally seen as posing a challenge for infant language learners, who must disregard this variation when the task is to detect talkers’ shared linguistic conventions. However, talkers often differ markedly in their pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. This is true even in monolingual environments, given facto...
5 CitationsSource
#1Christina Bergmann ('ENS Paris': École Normale Supérieure)H-Index: 6
#2Alejandrina Cristia ('ENS Paris': École Normale Supérieure)H-Index: 20
1 CitationsSource
#1Natalie Fecher (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 3
#2Elizabeth K. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 33
Talker recognition is a language-dependent process, with listeners recognizing talkers better when the talkers speak a familiar versus an unfamiliar language. This language familiarity effect (LFE) is firmly established in adults, but its developmental trajectory in children is not well understood. Some evidence suggests that the effect already exists in infancy, but little is known about how it unfolds in childhood. The present study explored whether the strength of the LFE increases in early c...
6 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth K. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 33
#2Laurence Bruggeman (Macquarie University)H-Index: 2
Last. Anne CutlerH-Index: 67
view all 3 authors...
Talkers are recognized more accurately if they are speaking the listeners’ native language rather than an unfamiliar language. This “language familiarity effect” has been shown not to depend upon comprehension and must instead involve language sound patterns. We further examine the level of sound-pattern processing involved, by comparing talker recognition in foreign languages versus two varieties of English, by (a) English speakers of one variety, (b) English speakers of the other variety, and ...
8 CitationsSource
A bilingual advantage has been found in both cognitive and social tasks. In the current study, we examine whether there is a bilingual advantage in how children process information about who is talking (talker-voice information). Younger and older groups of monolingual and bilingual children completed the following talker-voice tasks with bilingual speakers: a discrimination task in English and German (an unfamiliar language), and a talker-voice learning task in which they learned to identify th...
6 CitationsSource
#1Suzanne V. H. van der Feest (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 3
#2Elizabeth K. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 33
ABSTRACTHow does phonological development differ in children exposed to one versus two variants of a single language? If children receive mixed evidence for a phonological contrast (i.e., one language variant in the environment maintains a contrast while another neutralizes it), will they treat this contrast as noncontrastive (i.e., as allophonic)? Or will they learn that only some speakers maintain the contrast and use this information to strategically optimize online word recognition? We exami...
12 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth K. Johnson (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 33
Infants begin learning the phonological structure of their native language remarkably early and use this information to extract word-sized chunks from the speech signal. While acquiring the language-specific segmentation strategies appropriate for their native language, infants are simultaneously beginning to form word–object pairings and learning which sound contrasts are meaningful in the native language. They are also working out how to assign words to word classes, paying attention to the us...
20 CitationsSource
Cited By0
Newest