Icons / Logo / Facebook Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / Google Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / ORCID Created with Sketch. Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

An Academic–Practice Partnership at the University of Washington School of Public Health: The Student Epidemic Action Leaders (SEAL) Team:

Published on Nov 1, 2018in Public Health Reports 2.04
· DOI :10.1177/0033354918798805
Maayan Simckes1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UW: University of Washington),
Beth Melius3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Washington State Department of Health)
+ 2 AuthorsJanet G. Baseman11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Washington)
Cite
Abstract
In 2015, the University of Washington School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology established the Student Epidemic Action Leaders (SEAL) team to provide public health students with experience in field epidemiology in state and local public health communicable disease divisions. The University of Washington Department of Epidemiology developed the SEAL team in collaboration with the Washington State Department of Health to offer public health graduate students opportunities to contribute to the real-time needs of public health agencies during a communicable disease event and/or preparedness event. The SEAL team combines classroom and field-based training in public health practice and applied epidemiology. During the first 2 years of the SEAL team (2016-2018), 34 SEALs were placed at 4 agencies contributing more than 1300 hours of assistance on 24 public health projects.
  • References (11)
  • Citations (1)
Cite
References11
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2017in American Journal of Public Health 5.38
Scott L. Greer19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Phillip M. Singer4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UM: University of Michigan)
An editorial is presented which addresses America's public health funding in relation to a Zika virus outbreak, and it mentions how it took the U.S. Congress 220 days to respond to then-American President Barack Obama's request for emergency Zika virus funding in 2016. Political polarization and the transmission of the Zika virus in Florida and Puerto Rico are examined, along with the fragmentation of the U.S. public health system. A potential fund for public health emergencies is assessed.
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Journal of Food Protection 1.56
Heather Hanson5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
W. Thane Hancock1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 8 AuthorsLaura Gieraltowski7
Estimated H-index: 7
Since 2009, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) has received FoodCORE funding to hire graduate students to conduct in-depth food exposure interviews of salmonellosis case patients. In 2011, an increase in the number of Salmonella Heidelberg infections with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis XbaI pattern JF6X01.0022 among observant Jewish communities in New York and New Jersey was investigated. As this pattern is common nationwide, some cases identified were not associ...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Frontiers in Public Health
Kaitlin A. O'Keefe4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CSUN: California State University, Northridge),
Shira C. Shafir11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Kimberley I. Shoaf13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Introduction: Local health departments (LHDs) must have sufficient numbers of staff functioning in an epidemiologic role with proper education, training and skills to protect the health of communities they serve. This pilot study was designed to describe the composition, training and competency level of LHD staff and examine the hypothesis that potential disparities exist between LHDs serving different sized populations. Material and Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were conducted with directors...
Published on Dec 23, 2011in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 14.87
Matthew L. Boulton25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Lauren D. Rosenberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists)
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Public Health Reports 2.04
Matthew L. Boulton25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
James Hadler1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists)
+ 2 AuthorsMaureen Y. Lichtveld14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Tulane University)
Objectives.To assess the number of epidemiologists and epidemiology capacity nationally, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists surveyed state health departments in 2004, 2006, and 2009. This article summarizes findings of the 2009 assessment and analyzes five-year (2004–2009) trends in the epidemiology workforce.Methods.Online surveys collected information from all 50 states and the District of Columbia about the number of epidemiologists employed, their training and education, pr...
Published on Nov 1, 2010in Public Health Reports 2.04
JoLynn P. Montgomery7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Heidi Durbeck1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: University of Michigan)
+ 3 AuthorsMatthew L. Boulton25
Estimated H-index: 25
This article compares activities of the University of Michigan School of Public Health Public Health Action Support Team (PHAST) to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists Applied Epidemiology Competencies (AECs) to determine the utility of using the competencies to assess extracurricular student training. We mapped the activities from eight PHAST trips occurring from 2006 to 2009 to the 34 AECs for Tier 1 epidemiologists by examining proje...
Published on Nov 1, 2010in Public Health Reports 2.04
Kristen Pogreba-Brown4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Robin B. Harris41
Estimated H-index: 41
+ 3 AuthorsBob England1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Nov 1, 2010in Public Health Reports 2.04
Pia D.M. MacDonald16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Meredith K. Davis4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Jennifer A. Horney10
Estimated H-index: 10
The public health workforce in the United States is in decline. The workforce is both aging quickly and getting smaller.1 The average age of state public health employees is almost 47 years, with, on average, 24% eligible for retirement. In some states, as much as 45% of the workforce is eligible for retirement.2 Severe shortages in certain public health concentrations and high turnover rates further exacerbate the problem. A 2006 assessment of epidemiologic capacity by the Council of State and ...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Jul 15, 2019in Global Public Health 1.94
Haylea Hannah (UW: University of Washington), Audrey M.V. Brezak1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UW: University of Washington)
+ 11 AuthorsTsitsi Juru2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UZ: University of Zimbabwe)
ABSTRACTNational-level evaluations may fail to identify capacity improvements for detecting and responding to outbreaks which begin and are first detected at the local level. In response to this is...