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Janet G. Baseman
University of Washington
35Publications
11H-index
1,063Citations
Publications 35
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Public Health 2.42
Janet G. Baseman11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Washington),
Debra Revere11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Washington)
+ 5 AuthorsHendrika Meischke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UW: University of Washington)
Our public health emergency response system relies on the “first of the first responders”—the emergency call center workforce that handles the emergency needs of a public in distress. Call centers across the United States have been preparing for the “Next Generation 9-1-1” initiative, which will allow citizens to place 9–1-1 calls using a variety of digital technologies. The impacts of this initiative on a workforce that is already highly stressed is unknown. There is concern that these technolo...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Public Health 2.42
Hendrika Meischke33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UW: University of Washington),
Michelle M. Lilly12
Estimated H-index: 12
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
+ 6 AuthorsJanet G. Baseman11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Washington)
Nationwide, emergency response systems depend on 9-1-1 telecommunicators to prioritize, triage, and dispatch assistance to those in distress. 9-1-1 call center telecommunicators (TCs) are challenged by acute and chronic workplace stressors: tense interactions with citizen callers in crisis; overtime; shift-work; ever-changing technologies; and negative work culture, including co-worker conflict. This workforce is also subject to routine exposures to secondary traumatization while handling calls ...
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Published on Nov 1, 2018in Public Health Reports 1.60
Maayan Simckes1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UW: University of Washington),
Beth Melius3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Washington State Department of Health)
+ 2 AuthorsJanet G. Baseman11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Washington)
In 2015, the University of Washington School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology established the Student Epidemic Action Leaders (SEAL) team to provide public health students with experience in field epidemiology in state and local public health communicable disease divisions. The University of Washington Department of Epidemiology developed the SEAL team in collaboration with the Washington State Department of Health to offer public health graduate students opportunities to contribute ...
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Published on Jan 18, 2018in Clinical Infectious Diseases 9.12
Arianna Miles-Jay3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Seattle Children's Research Institute),
Scott J. Weissman22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Seattle Children's Research Institute)
+ 4 AuthorsDanielle M. Zerr32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Seattle Children's Research Institute)
Background: E. coli ST131- H30 is a globally important pathogen implicated in rising rates of multidrug resistance among E. coli causing extraintestinal infections. Previous studies have focused on adults, leaving the epidemiology of H30 among children undefined. Methods: We used clinical data and isolates from a case-control study of extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant E. coli conducted at four US childrens hospitals to estimate the burden and identify host correlates of infection with H3...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 10, 2017
Janet G. Baseman11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Debra Revere11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Ian Painter10
Estimated H-index: 10
Public health surveillance of communicable diseases depends on timely, complete, accurate, and useful data that are collected across a number of healthcare and public health systems. Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) which support electronic sharing of data and information between health care organizations are recognized as a source of ‘big data’ in healthcare and have the potential to provide public health with a single stream of data collated across disparate systems and sources. However, gi...
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Ian Painter10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UW: University of Washington),
Debra Revere11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Washington)
+ 1 AuthorsJanet G. Baseman11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Washington)
Background: Infectious diseases can appear and spread rapidly. Timely information about disease patterns and trends allows public health agencies to quickly investigate and efficiently contain those diseases. But disease case reporting to public health has traditionally been paper-based, resulting in somewhat slow, burdensome processes. Fortunately, the expanding use of electronic health records and health information exchanges has created opportunities for more rapid, complete, and easily manag...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 30, 2017in bioRxiv
Arianna Miles-Jay3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UW: University of Washington),
Scott J. Weissman5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Seattle Children's Research Institute)
+ 4 AuthorsDanielle M. Zerr10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Seattle Children's Research Institute)
Background: E. coli ST131-H30 is a globally important pathogen implicated in rising rates of multidrug resistance, especially fluoroquinolone resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production, among E. coli causing extraintestinal infections. Previous studies have focused on adults, especially the elderly, leaving the epidemiology of H30 among children undefined. Methods: We used clinical data and extraintestinal E. coli isolates from a case-control study conducted at four US fre...
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