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Linking big five personality traits to sexuality and sexual health: A meta-analytic review.

Published on Oct 1, 2018in Psychological Bulletin16.41
· DOI :10.1037/bul0000157
Mark S. Allen14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UOW: University of Wollongong),
Emma E. Walter5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
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Abstract
This meta-analytic review addresses whether the major dimensions of trait personality relate to components of human sexuality. A comprehensive literature search identified 137 studies that met inclusion criteria (761 effect sizes; total n = 420,595). Pooled mean effects were computed using inverse-variance weighted random effects meta-analysis. Mean effect sizes from 100 separate meta-analyses provided evidence that personality relates to theoretically predicted components of sexuality and sexual health. Neuroticism was positively related to sexual dissatisfaction (r+ = .18), negative emotions (r+ = .42), and symptoms of sexual dysfunction (r+ = .16). Extraversion was positively related to sexual activity (r+ = .17) and risky sexual behavior (r+ = .18), and negatively related to symptoms of sexual dysfunction (r+ = -.17). Openness was positively related to homosexual orientation (r+ = .16) and liberal attitudes toward sex (r+ = .19). Agreeableness and conscientiousness were negatively related to sexually aggressive behavior (r+ = -.20; r+ = -.14) and sexual infidelity (r+ = -.18; r+ = -.17). Less robust evidence indicated that extraversion related negatively, and neuroticism positively, to child sexual abuse, and that openness related negatively to homophobic attitudes. Random effects metaregression identified age, gender, and study quality as important moderators of pooled mean effects. These findings might be of interest to health care professionals developing health care services that aim to promote sexually healthy societies. (PsycINFO Database Record
  • References (219)
  • Citations (6)
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References219
Newest
Published on May 10, 2019in European Journal of Psychological Assessment2.23
René Mõttus15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UT: University of Tartu),
René Mõttus2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UT: University of Tartu)
+ 0 AuthorsAnu Realo37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Warw.: University of Warwick)
Abstract. Personality researchers often supplement or substitute self-reports with ratings from knowledgeable informants, at least implicitly assuming that the same constructs are being measured re...
Published on Oct 13, 2018in Journal of Sex Research3.06
Anthony F. Bogaert29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Brock University),
Michael C. Ashton46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Brock University),
Kibeom Lee44
Estimated H-index: 44
(U of C: University of Calgary)
Previous research has examined self-identified sexual orientation in relation to self-reports on the Big Five personality factors. Here we extend this research by including asexuality as a fourth sexual orientation and by assessing the HEXACO personality factors, using self-report data from a large anonymous online sample (N ≈ 100,000). A large overlap was observed among all sexual orientation groups on all six HEXACO dimensions, but notable group differences also emerged. All nonheterosexual gr...
Published on Jun 13, 2018in Journal of Sex Research3.06
Kristen P. Mark6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UK: University of Kentucky),
Julie A. Lasslo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(EKU: Eastern Kentucky University)
The most universally experienced sexual response is sexual desire. Though research on this topic has increased in recent years, low and high desire are still problematized in clinical settings and the broader culture. However, despite knowledge that sexual desire ebbs and flows both within and between individuals, and that problems with sexual desire are strongly linked to problems with relationships, there is a critical gap in understanding the factors that contribute to maintaining sexual desi...
Published on Apr 1, 2018in The Journal of Sexual Medicine3.65
Mark S. Allen14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UOW: University of Wollongong),
Emma E. Walter5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
Abstract Background Sexual dysfunction is a common problem among men and women and is associated with negative individual functioning, relationship difficulties, and lower quality of life. Aim To determine the magnitude of associations between 6 health-related lifestyle factors (cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, diet, caffeine, and cannabis use) and 3 common sexual dysfunctions (erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and female sexual dysfunction). Methods A comprehensi...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Addictive Behaviors Reports
Sinead Mary Moylett1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Cardiff University),
Brian M. Hughes21
Estimated H-index: 21
(National University of Ireland, Galway)
Abstract Introduction The study presented one of the first examinations of the associations among personality, alcohol-related protective behavioural strategies (PBS), alcohol consumption, sexual intercourse and sex-related alcohol negative consequences in Irish, female college students ( n = 522). Methods A cross-sectional observational design was employed and participants completed the study online. Participants completed measures of personality, alcohol-related PBS, alcohol consumption and se...
Published on Nov 22, 2017in Journal of Sex Research3.06
Maria Manuela Peixoto7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Minho),
Pedro Nobre24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Porto)
Personality traits and dysfunctional sexual beliefs have been described as vulnerability factors for sexual dysfunction in women, and have also been proposed as dispositional variables for the activation of incompetence schemas in response to negative sexual events. However, no study has tested the role of personality traits and dysfunctional sexual beliefs in the activation of incompetence schemas. The current study aimed to assess the moderator role of neuroticism, extraversion, and dysfunctio...
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Sex Roles2.28
Lara M. Greaves8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Auckland),
Fiona Kate Barlow19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 2 AuthorsChris G. Sibley39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Auckland)
Preliminary evidence in online and convenience samples has shown small but significant personality differences across sexual identity and gender over a number of personality traits. The idea that gender intersects with sexual identity to affect personality has been formalized into two hypotheses: the gender inversion hypothesis (that lesbians and heterosexual men, as well as gay men and heterosexual women, have indistinguishable mean scores on personality traits) and the gender shift hypothesis ...
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Journal of Family Psychology2.35
Lindsay T. Labrecque1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder),
Mark A. Whisman46
Estimated H-index: 46
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder)
Published on Sep 1, 2017in International Journal of Law and Psychiatry1.19
Coralie Boillat1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Basel),
Gunnar Deuring2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Basel)
+ 2 AuthorsTimm Rosburg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Basel)
Abstract Studies in child sex offenders (CSO) often report deviant personality characteristics. In our study, we investigated neuroticism in CSO and tested the hypothesis that CSO with high neuroticism show more serious abuse behavior and are more likely to exhibit sexual dysfunction and cognitive distortions, as compared to CSO with low neuroticism. A sample of 40 CSO (both child sexual abusers and child sexual material users) was split into two subsamples based on their neuroticism scores, obt...
Published on Aug 18, 2017in Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy1.73
Joana Carvalho24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Porto),
Diana Lemos1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Aveiro),
Pedro Nobre24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Porto)
The present study was aimed at exploring and describing potential psychological and cognitive features characterizing asexual individuals. A web survey targeting a community of single and highly educated asexual individuals (68 women and 19 men) and matching controls (58 women and 19 men) was carried out in volunteers over 18 years old. Participants responded to a set of questions assessing personality traits, state psychopathological dimensions, and sexual beliefs. Findings on asexual women rev...
Cited By6
Newest
Mark S. Allen14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
Strong evidence suggests that sexual behavior and reproductive success can be predicted by personality traits. Here, I review new studies that have contributed to the understanding of these associa...
Published on Aug 1, 2019in Computers in Human Behavior4.31
Chiungjung Huang12
Estimated H-index: 12
(NCUE: National Changhua University of Education),
Chiungjung Huang (NCUE: National Changhua University of Education)
Abstract This meta-analysis summarized the relations between social network site use and neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. Sixty-one articles comprising 67 independent samples ( N = 22,899 participants) were identified. The overall correlations of social network site use with neuroticism ( r ¯ = 0.08) and extraversion ( r ¯ = 0.09) were about positively small, while conscientiousness had a negative and quite small correlation with social network site use w...
Published on May 8, 2019
David C. Funder51
Estimated H-index: 51
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Daniel J. Ozer20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Effect sizes are underappreciated and often misinterpreted—the most common mistakes being to describe them in ways that are uninformative (e.g., using arbitrary standards) or misleading (e.g., squaring effect-size rs). We propose that effect sizes can be usefully evaluated by comparing them with well-understood benchmarks or by considering them in terms of concrete consequences. In that light, we conclude that when reliably estimated (a critical consideration), an effect-size r of .05 indicates ...
Published on Apr 3, 2019in Psychophysiology3.38
Lauren Delaparte4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Elizabeth Bartlett2
Estimated H-index: 2
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 5 AuthorsRoman Kotov36
Estimated H-index: 36
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Published on Mar 13, 2019in Frontiers in Psychology2.13
Laura Mernone , Serena Fiacco1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Ulrike Ehlert52
Estimated H-index: 52
Background: A variety of biological and psychosocial factors are associated with women’s sexual health in midlife and older age. Evidence suggests a decline in sexual functioning in the context of aging and the menopausal transition, including changes in sexual desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, pain, and/or contentment. However, not all women in midlife and older age experience such a decline, and it remains unclear how the endocrine environment and psychosocial aspects contribute to the mai...
Published on Nov 14, 2018in Psychological Reports1.02
Sigal Levy3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Jonathan E. Handelzalts3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UM: University of Michigan)
+ 1 AuthorsShulamit Geller1
Estimated H-index: 1
In this study, we aimed to measure the association between the postpartum personality and sexual functioning. This association was examined in light of the possible mediation effect of body image measures, that is, body satisfaction and body exposure during sexual activity. This cross-sectional study employed a web-based questionnaire for women who had given birth in the previous year (N = 382). Key outcome measures included sexual functioning after birth, body image satisfaction, neuroticism, a...
Published on Nov 2, 2018in Psychology & Health2.40
Mark S. Allen14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UOW: University of Wollongong),
Davina A. Robson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
AbstractObjective: There is some evidence that personality relates to childbearing in adulthood but the importance of personality for reproductive capacity is unknown. This study explored cross-time associations between the major dimensions of trait personality and self-reported fertility and fecundity. Methods: A representative sample of young Australian adults [n = 4501; age range ≈ 18–44 (women), 18–54 (men)] provided information on personality, fertility, fertility intentions, fecundity and ...