Match!

Collaborative writing in the EFL classroom: The effects of L1 and L2 use

Published on Aug 1, 2018in System1.93
· DOI :10.1016/j.system.2018.04.009
Meixiu Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Previous research has demonstrated that collaborative writing (CW) tasks are useful instructional activities as they increase the learning opportunities in language classrooms (Li & Zhu, 2017). However, when implementing CW tasks, language teachers in contexts where learners share an L1 are faced with a question—should learners interact with peers in the L1 or the L2? Existing research has focused on analyzing the functions of L1 interaction in CW, but no research has examined the effects of L1 use on the co-constructed texts. The present study addressed this question by investigating the effects of L1 and L2 use on the complexity, accuracy, fluency, and text quality of learners’ co-constructed texts. Thirty-five pairs of intermediate EFL learners were placed in two groups to write argumentative essays in English. First, group 1 ( n  = 18 pairs) interacted in the L1 and group 2 ( n  = 17 pairs) interacted in the L2. Next, the groups switched the language for interaction and wrote a second essay. The co-constructed essays were rated for complexity, accuracy, fluency, and text quality. The results indicate that collaboration in the L1 leads to higher syntactic complexity but no differences in accuracy, fluency, and text quality. Theoretical and pedagogical implications were discussed.
  • References (46)
  • Citations (3)
Cite
References46
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2017in System1.93
María del Pilar García Mayo14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country),
María de los Ángeles Hidalgo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country)
Abstract A growing body of research suggests that a balanced use of the first language (L1) in the foreign language classroom yields beneficial effects for second language (L2) learning. Still, the extent to which young learners in foreign language contexts actually make use of their L1 while completing tasks is in need of further research, especially in an approach that has become prevalent in Europe: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The current longitudinal study analyzes the o...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Mimi Li7
Estimated H-index: 7
(GS: Georgia Southern University),
Neomy Storch26
Estimated H-index: 26
Published on Jun 1, 2017in System1.93
Hyung-Jo Yoon2
Estimated H-index: 2
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Abstract This study aims to explore the validity of syntactic, lexical, and morphological complexity measures in capturing topic and proficiency differences in L2 writing. The additional purpose of this study is to examine how these measures gauge distinct dimensions of complexity. To these ends, this study examined a corpus of 1198 argumentative essays on two different topics written by college-level Chinese EFL learners. The essays were analyzed for topic effects (within-subjects) and for deve...
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Mimi Li7
Estimated H-index: 7
(GS: Georgia Southern University),
Wei Zhu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(USF: University of South Florida)
Abstract The wiki has empowered collaborative writing in L2 classes during this decade. Previous studies investigated wiki writing processes, including students’ contribution to wiki texts and patterns of interaction, but scarce is the research on the quality of wiki writing products in relation to peer interaction during writing processes. This article reports a case study that examined collaborative wiki writing texts, and explored the links between wiki-mediated interactions and wiki products...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Written Communication1.22
Shelley Staples7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Purdue University),
Jesse Egbert7
Estimated H-index: 7
(BYU: Brigham Young University)
+ 1 AuthorsBethany Gray15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Iowa State University)
Using the British Academic Written English corpus, this study focuses on the use of grammatical complexity features in university level texts written by first language (L1) English writers to demonstrate knowledge and perform other specialized tasks required of advanced academic writers. While the primary focus of the analysis is on writing development from first-year undergraduate to graduate students, we also consider interactions with discipline and genre. The study goes beyond most previous ...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Mimi Li7
Estimated H-index: 7
(GS: Georgia Southern University),
Deoksoon Kim8
Estimated H-index: 8
(USF: University of South Florida)
Abstract With the growing importance of Web 2.0 tools for communication and collaboration, small group writing using one such tool—the wiki—has been increasingly implemented in second language classes. A few researchers have examined group interactions during wiki-based collaborative writing, but little research has explored changes in interaction patterns that occur when students perform multiple wiki writing tasks. This study investigates two ESL groups’ interactions during two collaborative w...
Published on Jul 4, 2013
Neomy Storch26
Estimated H-index: 26
Preface Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Theoretical and pedagogical rationale for collaborative L2 writing Chapter 3: Collaborative writing: L2 learning and practice opportunities Chapter 4: Factors affecting languaging in collaborative writing Chapter 5: Collaborative writing and language learning Chapter 6: Learners' perspectives of collaborative writing Chapter 7: Computer mediated collaborative writing Chapter 8: Conclusion: Pedagogical implications and research directions
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Language Teaching Research2.32
Neomy Storch26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Melbourne),
Ali Aldosari5
Estimated H-index: 5
(KSU: King Saud University)
Although pair work is advocated by major theories of second language (L2) learning and research findings suggest that pair work facilitates L2 learning, what is unclear is how to best pair students in L2 classes of mixed L2 proficiency. This study investigated the nature of pair work in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) class in a college in Saudi Arabia. The L2 proficiency of the learners in such classes is often quite heterogeneous. Thirty learners allocated into similar (high–high and lo...
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Douglas Biber4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Bethany Gray15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NAU: Northern Arizona University)
One of the most distinctive linguistic characteristics of modern academic writing is its reliance on nominalized structures. These include nouns that have been morphologically derived from verbs (e.g., development, progression) as well as verbs that have been ‘converted’ to nouns (e.g., increase, use). Almost any sentence taken from an academic research article will illustrate the use of such structures. For example, consider the opening sentences from three education research articles; derived ...
Cited By3
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing4.20
Meixiu Zhang (NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Abstract Understanding the nature of collaboration is critical in collaborative writing (CW), as it impacts the amount of scaffolding that occurs and the amount of linguistic knowledge that can be retained (Storch, 2013). The most prevalent model to examine peer collaboration in CW is based on a global qualitative analysis of learners’ involvement in and control over a writing task (Storch, 2001a). However, this model does not account for the fluctuating nature of peer collaboration in CW. This ...
Published in TESOL Journal
Matt J. Kessler1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Published on Jul 4, 2019in Language Teaching Research2.32
Meixiu Zhang (NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Despite previous research suggesting that first language (L1) use fulfills important functions in collaborative writing (CW) tasks, research has yet to examine whether L1 or second language (L2) us...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Lingua0.96
Tina Gunnarsson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Lund University),
Tina Gunnarsson
Abstract This article examines six multilingual students’ composing processes and language use while writing in L2 English. Four participants have two L1s: Swedish and either Bosnian ( N = 2) or Macedonian ( N = 2). The remaining two participants have Swedish as their L1. Building on an L2 composing model ( Wang and Wen, 2002 ) and the theory of Language Mode ( Grosjean, 2008 ), the study uses think-aloud data to examine participants’ use of their language repertoires while writing an essay in L...
Published on Apr 20, 2019in Asia-pacific Education Researcher0.85
Wenting Chen (Capital Normal University)
While research into the potential benefits of second or foreign language (L2 or FL) collaborative writing for jointly written texts has proliferated in the last few decades, it remains unclear whether texts that learners compose individually after such activities demonstrate improved quality, accuracy, fluency, and complexity. This study compares individually written texts produced by students on post-tests in two parallel classes (one exposed to collaborative writing practice for a semester and...
Published on Apr 11, 2019in Language Teaching Research2.32
Wenting Chen (Capital Normal University), Susanna Hapgood2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UT: University of Toledo)
Although research about group interactions during second or foreign language (L2 or EFL) collaborative writing has proliferated in the last few decades, little is known about the role of psychological factors, like learners’ knowledge about collaborative writing, in affecting students’ patterns of interaction and learning in collaborative writing. Informed by metacognitive theory, this study used a mixed-method approach to investigate whether and how L2 students’ knowledge about collaborative wr...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in System1.93
María del Pilar García Mayo14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country),
Ainara Imaz Agirre2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract Research on L2 interaction among adults has shown that task modality influences language learning opportunities, with oral tasks eliciting more attention to meaning and tasks including a written component more attention to form. Recent research has also shown that pairing method has an impact on the nature of peer interaction. However, no research on these topics has been carried out with young learners in foreign language settings. This study examines the interaction of 32 dyads of 11–...