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Cryptographic decoding of movement

Published on Dec 1, 2017in Nature Biomedical Engineering
· DOI :10.1038/s41551-017-0175-9
Vikash Gilja21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
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Abstract
A method inspired by cryptography maps neural activity to limb movement without requiring the simultaneous collection of neural activity in the motor cortex and of the corresponding physical actions.
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References13
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Published on Feb 21, 2017in eLife 7.55
Chethan Pandarinath12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Paul Nuyujukian22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 6 AuthorsJaimie M. Henderson39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Stanford University)
People with various forms paralysis not only have difficulties getting around, but also are less able to use many communication technologies including computers. In particular, strokes, neurological injuries, or diseases such as ALS can lead to severe paralysis and make it very difficult to communicate. In rare instances, these disorders can result in a condition called locked-in syndrome, in which the affected person is aware but completely unable to move or speak. Several researchers are looki...
Published on Nov 11, 2015in Science Translational Medicine 17.16
Beata Jarosiewicz12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Brown University),
Anish A. Sarma4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Brown University)
+ 14 AuthorsVikash Gilja21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Brown University)
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) promise to restore independence for people with severe motor disabilities by translating decoded neural activity directly into the control of a computer. However, recorded neural signals are not stationary (that is, can change over time), degrading the quality of decoding. Requiring users to pause what they are doing whenever signals change to perform decoder recalibration routines is time-consuming and impractical for everyday use of BCIs. We demonstrate that si...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Nature Communications 11.88
Jonathan C. Kao13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Paul Nuyujukian22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 3 AuthorsKrishna V. Shenoy52
Estimated H-index: 52
Increasing evidence suggests that neural population responses have their own internal drive, or dynamics, that describe how the neural population evolves through time. An important prediction of neural dynamical models is that previously observed neural activity is informative of noisy yet-to-be-observed activity on single-trials, and may thus have a denoising effect. To investigate this prediction, we built and characterized dynamical models of single-trial motor cortical activity. We find thes...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Nature Medicine 30.64
Vikash Gilja21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Chethan Pandarinath12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 9 AuthorsLeigh R. Hochberg30
Estimated H-index: 30
An intracortical neural prosthetic system developed in animal studies is translated for clinical use in humans with paralysis. Neural control of computer cursor movements achieved with this system represent the highest performance reported to date.
Published on Jun 3, 2015in Science Translational Medicine 17.16
Teri A. Manolio101
Estimated H-index: 101
(NIH: National Institutes of Health),
Marc Abramowicz34
Estimated H-index: 34
(ULB: Université libre de Bruxelles)
+ 41 AuthorsRex L. Chisholm49
Estimated H-index: 49
(NU: Northwestern University)
Around the world, innovative genomic-medicine programs capitalize on singular capabilities arising from local health care systems, cultural or political milieus, and unusual selected risk alleles or disease burdens. Such individual efforts might benefit from the sharing of approaches and lessons learned in other locales. The U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute and the National Academy of Medicine recently brought together 25 of these groups to compare projects, to examine the current s...
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Nature 43.07
Patrick T. Sadtler7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Pittsburgh),
Kristin M. Quick3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 5 AuthorsAaron P. Batista21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Pittsburgh)
During learning, the new patterns of neural population activity that develop are constrained by the existing network structure so that certain patterns can be generated more readily than others.
Published on Feb 1, 2013in The Lancet 59.10
Jennifer L. Collinger20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Pittsburgh),
Brian Wodlinger9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 7 AuthorsAndrew B. Schwartz36
Estimated H-index: 36
Summary Background Paralysis or amputation of an arm results in the loss of the ability to orient the hand and grasp, manipulate, and carry objects, functions that are essential for activities of daily living. Brain–machine interfaces could provide a solution to restoring many of these lost functions. We therefore tested whether an individual with tetraplegia could rapidly achieve neurological control of a high-performance prosthetic limb using this type of an interface. Methods We implanted two...
Published on Dec 1, 2012in Nature Neuroscience 21.13
Vikash Gilja21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Stanford University),
Paul Nuyujukian22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Stanford University)
+ 8 AuthorsStephen I. Ryu37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Stanford University)
Current neural prostheses can translate neural activity into control signals for guiding prosthetic devices, but poor performance limits practical application. Here the authors present a new cursor-control algorithm that approaches native arm control speed and accuracy, permits sustained uninterrupted use for hours, generalizes to more challenging tasks and provides repeatable high performance for years after implantation, thereby increasing the clinical viability of neural prostheses.
Amy L. Orsborn11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of California, Berkeley),
Siddharth Dangi8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 1 AuthorsJose M. Carmena36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of California, Berkeley)
Closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA) shows great promise to improve closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) performance. Developing adaptation algorithms capable of rapidly improving performance, independent of initial performance, may be crucial for clinical applications where patients have limited movement and sensory abilities due to motor deficits. Given the subject-decoder interactions inherent in closed-loop BMIs, the decoder adaptation time-scale may be of particular importance when in...
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