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Beliefs about emotion: implications for avoidance-based emotion regulation and psychological health

Published on May 19, 2018in Cognition & Emotion2.37
· DOI :10.1080/02699931.2017.1353485
Krista De Castella7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ANU: Australian National University),
Michael J. Platow28
Estimated H-index: 28
(ANU: Australian National University)
+ 1 AuthorsLisa Feldman Barrett L F131
Estimated H-index: 131
(Stanford University)
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Abstract
ABSTRACTPeople’s beliefs about their ability to control their emotions predict a range of important psychological outcomes. It is not clear, however, whether these beliefs are playing a causal role, and if so, why this might be. In the current research, we tested whether avoidance-based emotion regulation explains the link between beliefs and psychological outcomes. In Study 1 (N = 112), a perceived lack of control over emotions predicted poorer psychological health outcomes (increased self-reported avoidance, lower well-being, and higher levels of clinical symptoms), and avoidance strategies indirectly explained these links between emotion beliefs and psychological health. In Study 2 (N = 101), we experimentally manipulated participants’ emotion beliefs by leading participants to believe that they struggled (low regulatory self-efficacy) or did not struggle (high regulatory self-efficacy) with controlling their emotions. Participants in the low regulatory self-efficacy condition reported increased intent...
  • References (127)
  • Citations (9)
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References127
Newest
Published on Oct 2, 2016in Cognition & Emotion2.37
Yochanan E. Bigman5
Estimated H-index: 5
(HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem),
Iris B. Mauss34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 1 AuthorsMaya Tamir30
Estimated H-index: 30
(HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
People who expect to be successful in regulating their emotions tend to experience less frequent negative emotions and are less likely to suffer from depression. It is not clear, however, whether beliefs about the likelihood of success in emotion regulation can shape actual emotion regulation success. To test this possibility, we manipulated participants' beliefs about the likelihood of success in emotion regulation and assessed their subsequent ability to regulate their emotions during a negati...
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Motivation and Emotion1.46
Elizabeth T. Kneeland3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Yale University),
Susan Nolen-Hoeksema74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Yale University)
+ 1 AuthorsJune Gruber31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder)
The current study examined how manipulating information about whether emotions are fixed or malleable influences the extent to which individuals engage in different emotion regulation strategies. We hypothesized that fixed, compared to malleable, emotion beliefs would produce less effort invested in emotion regulation. Participants were randomly assigned to experimental conditions emphasizing that emotions are malleable or fixed, and then completed an autobiographical negative emotion induction....
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Personality and Social Psychology Review9.90
Maya Tamir30
Estimated H-index: 30
Emotion regulation involves the pursuit of desired emotional states (i.e., emotion goals) in the service of superordinate motives. The nature and consequences of emotion regulation, therefore, are likely to depend on the motives it is intended to serve. Nonetheless, limited attention has been devoted to studying what motivates emotion regulation. By mapping the potential benefits of emotion to key human motives, this review identifies key classes of motives in emotion regulation. The proposed ta...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Cognitive Therapy and Research2.28
Elizabeth T. Kneeland3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Yale University),
Susan Nolen-Hoeksema74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Yale University)
+ 1 AuthorsJune Gruber31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CU: University of Colorado Boulder)
The current study examined how manipulating individuals’ beliefs about emotion’s malleability influences the choices they make in how they spontaneously regulate their anxiety during a stressful social situation. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either an experimental manipulation that emotions are malleable or that emotions are fixed then completed an impromptu, brief speech task designed to elicit anxiety. We predicted that participants in the malleable emotion condition, compare...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Clinical Psychology Review9.90
Elizabeth T. Kneeland3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Yale University),
John F. Dovidio89
Estimated H-index: 89
(Yale University)
+ 1 AuthorsMargaret S. Clark44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Yale University)
Beliefs that individuals hold about whether emotions are malleable or fixed, also referred to as emotion malleability beliefs, may play a crucial role in individuals' emotional experiences and their engagement in changing their emotions. The current review integrates affective science and clinical science perspectives to provide a comprehensive review of how emotion malleability beliefs relate to emotionality, emotion regulation, and specific clinical disorders and treatment. Specifically, we di...
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Educational Research Review5.20
Toni Honicke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Deakin University),
Jaclyn Broadbent11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Deakin University)
This review integrates 12 years of research on the relationship between academic self-efficacy and university student's academic performance, and known cognitive and motivational variables that explain this relationship. Previous reviews report moderate correlations between these variables, but few discuss mediating and moderating factors that impact this relationship. Systematic searches were conducted in April 2015 of psychological, educational, and relevant online databases for studies invest...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Social Justice Research1.24
Michael J. Platow28
Estimated H-index: 28
(ANU: Australian National University),
Yuen J. Huo20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UC: University of California)
+ 2 AuthorsTom R. Tyler + etal91
Estimated H-index: 91
(Yale University)
Although a large body of empirical and theoretical work in procedural justice points to the positive consequences of providing voice to people, it remains unclear whether, and to what degree, people may desire voice in the first instance. The current paper presents two studies in which we directly measure people’s relative levels of voice desires and expectations. We hypothesized that any variability in these outcomes would be predicted, at least in part, by people’s relative levels of social id...
Published on Oct 3, 2015in The Journal of Psychology1.43
Nancy C. Higgins11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of St. Thomas (Minnesota)),
S. Jeffrey Bailey5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNB: University of New Brunswick)
+ 2 AuthorsThomas Hadjistavropoulos36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of Regina)
ABSTRACTWhereas some individuals use active coping strategies and are able to adaptively cope with their pain, others use passive strategies and catastrophic appraisals, which are often associated with increased displays of pain behavior and negative pain-related outcomes. To investigate attribution-based implicit theories as a potential underlying mechanism that might affect coping success, we hypothesized that pain patients with an incremental implicit theory of pain (i.e., view pain as mallea...
Published on Sep 1, 2015in European Journal of Psychology of Education1.53
Krista De Castella7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Stanford University),
D. G. Byrne25
Estimated H-index: 25
(ANU: Australian National University)
The belief that intelligence is malleable has important consequences for achievement and motivation (Blackwell et al. Child Development, 78, 246-263. 2007; Dweck, 1999; Robins & Pals, Self and Identity, 1,313-336, 2002). However, believing that it is possible to improve intelligence does not necessarily mean students are always confident they can improve their own. The current study presents a revised “self-theory” measure of the implicit theories of intelligence scale, which assess students’ be...
Published on May 22, 2015in Frontiers in Psychology2.13
Rosario Cabello12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UCLM: University of Castilla–La Mancha),
Pablo Fernández-Berrocal35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UMA: University of Málaga)
Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists), whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists). The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688), implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI) m...
Cited By9
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Vocational Behavior3.39
Peter A. Heslin17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Lauren Ashleigh Keating1
Estimated H-index: 1
(EMLYON Business School),
Susan J. Ashford38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UM: University of Michigan)
Abstract A sustainable career is one in which individuals enjoy at least a moderate degree of productivity, health, and happiness across their lifespan. To elucidate what people might need to learn to enhance their career sustainability, we depict a wide range of typical career- and home-realm challenges. Being in learning mode is proposed as a self-regulatory meta-competency that shapes self-directed learning regarding how to tackle sustainable career challenges. People are in learning mode whe...
Published on May 28, 2019in Disability and Rehabilitation2.05
Niamh McAleese (Western General Hospital), Azucena Guzmán3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid Gillespie8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Western General Hospital)
AbstractIntroduction: Post-stroke emotionalism, outbursts of involuntary crying or laughing, is common after stroke. Little is known about the psychosocial factors associated with this neurological disorder.Aim: To investigate participant’s experiences of emotionalism and explore how they managed their symptoms.Methods: A qualitative study that used framework analysis. Participants were recruited across inpatient and outpatient stroke settings. The average time since stroke was 4.3 months.Result...
Published on May 13, 2019in PLOS ONE2.78
Kruti Surti1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMSL: University of Missouri–St. Louis),
Sandra J. E. Langeslag12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UMSL: University of Missouri–St. Louis)
Research has shown that romantic love can be regulated. We investigated perceptions about love regulation, because these perceptions may impact mental health and influence love regulation application. Two-hundred eighty-six participants completed a series of items online via Qualtrics that assessed perceived ability to up- and down-regulate, exaggerate and suppress the expression of, and start and stop different love types. We also tested individual differences in perceived love regulation abili...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Child and Family Studies1.56
Alysse Schultheis (Yale University), Linda C. Mayes67
Estimated H-index: 67
(Yale University),
Helena J. V. Rutherford17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Yale University)
Emotion regulation encapsulates the capability to successfully manage an ongoing emotional experience, particularly in social interactions, and thus may be especially significant to early parent-child relationships. In particular, the capacity to adjust emotions may support parental mentalization and reflective functioning – how parents think about their own and their child’s mental states and how these mental states effect behavior. To examine this issue, we investigated the association between...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Cognitive Therapy and Research2.28
Hans S. Schroder12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Harvard University),
Elizabeth T. Kneeland3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Harvard University)
+ 2 AuthorsThröstur Björgvinsson19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Harvard University)
Beliefs about the malleability of self-attributes—mindsets—may have important relevance to clinical psychology. Individuals with growth mindsets of anxiety and general emotions (the belief that these attributes are changeable) report fewer psychological symptoms, more adaptive emotion regulation strategies, and prefer effortful treatments. However, most research has been conducted in unselected student samples, limiting understanding of clinical utility. Thus, we evaluated mindsets of anxiety an...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Personality and Individual Differences2.00
Ronnel B. King19
Estimated H-index: 19
(HKU: University of Hong Kong),
Elmer D. Dela Rosa2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Central Luzon State University)
Abstract Much of the research on implicit theories has focused on theories of intelligence. The aim of the present study was to examine how implicit theories of emotion were associated with positive and negative indicators of well-being via cognitive reappraisal. College students ( n = 355) answered relevant questionnaires. Results indicated that entity theory of emotion (thinking that emotions are uncontrollable) was detrimental to well-being. Entity theory of emotion negatively predicted the u...
Published on Jul 31, 2018in Journal of Health Psychology2.26
Danielle Cosme3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UO: University of Oregon),
Elliot T. Berkman28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UO: University of Oregon)
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Journal of Affective Disorders4.08
Sunkyung Yoon3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USF: University of South Florida),
Van Dang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USF: University of South Florida)
+ 1 AuthorsJohnathan Rottenberg30
Estimated H-index: 30
(USF: University of South Florida)
Abstract Objectives We performed a conceptual and meta-analytic review of the relationship between negative cognitive and affective evaluations of negative emotional experiences (negative ATE) and depression. We examined the negative ATE-depression relationship in terms of three ATE constructs: fear of emotion, non-acceptance of emotion, and distress intolerance. We also explored whether the negative ATE-depression relationship differs as a function of specific emotions. Methods Seventy articles...
Published on Dec 21, 2017in Emotion3.13
Eric N. Smith2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Stanford University),
Carissa Romero4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Stanford University)
+ 5 AuthorsLisa Feldman Barrett L F131
Estimated H-index: 131
(Stanford University)
View next paperSpecific Beliefs about Emotions Are Associated with Different Emotion-Regulation Strategies