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Belowground top-down and aboveground bottom-up effects structure multitrophic community relationships in a biodiverse forest

Published on Dec 1, 2017in Scientific Reports 4.01
· DOI :10.1038/s41598-017-04619-3
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Helge Bruelheide38
Estimated H-index: 38
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
+ 9 AuthorsTesfaye Wubet29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)
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Abstract
Ecosystem functioning and human well-being critically depend on numerous species interactions above- and belowground. However, unraveling the structure of multitrophic interaction webs at the ecosystem level is challenging for biodiverse ecosystems. Attempts to identify major relationships between trophic levels usually rely on simplified proxies, such as species diversity. Here, we propose to consider the full information on species composition across trophic levels, using Procrustes correlation and structural equation models. We show that species composition data of a highly diverse subtropical forest―with 5,716 taxa across 25 trophic groups― reveal strong interrelationships among plants, arthropods, and microorganisms, indicating complex multitrophic interactions. We found substantial support for top-down effects of microorganisms belowground, indicating important feedbacks of microbial symbionts, pathogens, and decomposers on plant communities. In contrast, aboveground pathways were characterized by bottom-up control of plants on arthropods, including many non-trophic links. Additional analyses based on diversity patterns revealed much weaker interrelationships. Our study suggests that multitrophic communities in our forest system are structured via top-down effects of belowground biota on plants, which in turn affect aboveground arthropod communities across trophic levels. Moreover, the study shows that the consequences of species loss will be more complex than indicated by studies based solely on diversity.
  • References (66)
  • Citations (14)
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References66
Newest
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Conservation Biology 6.19
Nigel E. Stork41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Griffith University),
Diane S. Srivastava33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
+ 4 AuthorsAllan D. Watt34
Estimated H-index: 34
Lawton et al. (1998) found, in a highly cited study, that the species richness of 8 taxa each responds differently to anthropogenic disturbance in Cameroon forests. Recent developments in conservation science suggest that net number of species is an insensitive measure of change and that understanding which species are affected by disturbance is more important. It is also recognized that all disturbance types are not equal in their effect on species and that grouping species according to functio...
Published on Jan 13, 2017in Science 41.04
Jonathan A. Bennett14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Hafiz Maherali31
Estimated H-index: 31
(U of G: University of Guelph)
+ 3 AuthorsJohn N. Klironomos53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
Feedback with soil biota is an important determinant of terrestrial plant diversity. However, the factors regulating plant-soil feedback, which varies from positive to negative among plant species, remain uncertain. In a large-scale study involving 55 species and 550 populations of North American trees, the type of mycorrhizal association explained much of the variation in plant-soil feedbacks. In soil collected beneath conspecifics, arbuscular mycorrhizal trees experienced negative feedback, wh...
Published on Jul 13, 2016
Michael Staab11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Freiburg),
Helge Bruelheide38
Estimated H-index: 38
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
+ 4 AuthorsAlexandra-Maria Klein48
Estimated H-index: 48
(University of Freiburg)
Evidence from grassland experiments suggests that a plant community9s phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a strong predictor of ecosystem processes, even stronger than species richness per se . This has, however, never been extended to species-rich forests and host–parasitoid interactions. We used cavity-nesting Hymenoptera and their parasitoids collected in a subtropical forest as a model system to test whether hosts, parasitoids, and their interactions are influenced by tree PD and a comprehensive ...
Published on Feb 29, 2016in Journal of Plant Ecology-uk 2.28
Michael Staab11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Freiburg),
Joel Methorst1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsAlexandra-Maria Klein48
Estimated H-index: 48
(University of Freiburg)
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Nature Communications 11.88
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Lüneburg University),
Tesfaye Wubet29
Estimated H-index: 29
+ 13 AuthorsMAKeping41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Subtropical and tropical forests are biodiversity hotspots, and untangling the spatial scaling of their diversity is fundamental for understanding global species richness and conserving biodiversity essential to human well-being. However, scale-dependent diversity distributions among coexisting taxa remain poorly understood for heterogeneous environments in biodiverse regions. We show that diversity relations among 43 taxa—including plants, arthropods and microorganisms—in a mountainous subtropi...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Ecology Letters 8.70
Albert Barberán16
Estimated H-index: 16
(CIRES: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences),
Krista L. McGuire19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Columbia University)
+ 7 AuthorsNoah Fierer94
Estimated H-index: 94
(CIRES: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences)
The complexities of the relationships between plant and soil microbial communities remain unresolved. We determined the associations between plant aboveground and belowground (root) distributions and the communities of soil fungi and bacteria found across a diverse tropical forest plot. Soil microbial community composition was correlated with the taxonomic and phylogenetic structure of the aboveground plant assemblages even after controlling for differences in soil characteristics, but these rel...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Journal of Ecology 5.69
Yan Zhu40
Estimated H-index: 40
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Liza S. Comita25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Yale University)
+ 1 AuthorsMAKeping41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Summary Ecologists have long recognized that plant performance is affected by the density and composition of neighbouring individuals. With the advent of highly resolved species-level phylogenies, it has become possible to test whether such density-dependent neighbourhood interactions are also phylogenetically dependent. Most studies of density dependence have focused on a single life stage; however, the relative importance of different neighbourhood interactions may shift over the lifetime of a...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Journal of Vegetation Science 2.94
Evy Ampoorter13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UGent: Ghent University),
Lander Baeten28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 6 AuthorsKris Verheyen49
Estimated H-index: 49
(UGent: Ghent University)
Questions The forest herb layer provides a multitude of ecosystem services as a result of its species-rich character. Herb layer diversity and biomass are both influenced by tree layer composition and species richness through species-specific influences on environmental conditions. The results of observational studies on richness–biomass relationships between tree and herb layer have not been unequivocal. We examined tree species identity and richness effects on herb layer species richness, comp...
Published on May 1, 2015in Biotropica 2.99
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Lüneburg University),
Michael Staab11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Freiburg)
In species-rich ecosystems, such as subtropical and tropical forests, higher trophic level interactions are key mediators of ecosystem functioning. Plant species loss may alter these interactions, but the effects of plant diversity might be modified by intraguild interactions, particularly among predators. We analyzed the relationships between spiders and ants, two dominant predatory arthropod taxa, on tree saplings across a gradient from medium to high woody plant species richness in a subtropi...
Published on Mar 1, 2015in New Phytologist 7.30
Marcel G. A. van der Heijden43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UU: Utrecht University),
Francis Martin21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Lorraine)
+ 1 AuthorsIan R. Sanders45
Estimated H-index: 45
(UNIL: University of Lausanne)
'Summary' 1406 I. 'Introduction' 1407 II. 'Biodiversity of mycorrhizal associations' 1408 III. 'Carbon and nutrient cycling and ecosystem multifunctionality' 1410 IV. 'Mycorrhizal networks' 1411 V. 'Evolution and partner selection' 1413 VI. 'Mycorrhizal genomics and symbiotic molecular crosstalk' 1416 VII. 'Conclusions and future research' 1418 'Acknowledgements' 1418 References 1419 Summary Almost all land plants form symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi. These below-ground fungi play ...
Cited By14
Newest
Published in Scientific Reports 4.01
Jason Vleminckx6
Estimated H-index: 6
(FIU: Florida International University),
Heidy Schimann14
Estimated H-index: 14
(INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)
+ -3 AuthorsAurélie Dourdain4
Estimated H-index: 4
Little is known regarding how trophic interactions shape community assembly in tropical forests. Here we assess multi-taxonomic community assembly rules using a rare standardized coordinated inventory comprising exhaustive surveys of five highly-diverse taxonomic groups exerting key ecological functions: trees, fungi, earthworms, ants and spiders. We sampled 36 1.9-ha plots from four remote locations in French Guiana including precise soil measurements, and we tested whether species turnover was...
Published on Mar 7, 2019in Nature Communications 11.88
Paul B.L. George1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Bangor University),
Delphine Lallias10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Université Paris-Saclay)
+ 8 AuthorsDavid A. Robinson45
Estimated H-index: 45
Soil biota accounts for ~25% of global biodiversity and is vital to nutrient cycling and primary production. There is growing momentum to study total belowground biodiversity across large ecological scales to understand how habitat and soil properties shape belowground communities. Microbial and animal components of belowground communities follow divergent responses to soil properties and land use intensification; however, it is unclear whether this extends across heterogeneous ecosystems. Here,...
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Movement ecology
Meike Schuppenhauer (TUD: Dresden University of Technology), Ricarda Lehmitz5
Estimated H-index: 5
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
Willi E.R. Xylander4
Estimated H-index: 4
(International Institute of Minnesota)
Oribatida and Collembola are an important part of the soil food web and increase soil fertility by contributing to the recycling of nutrients out of dead organic matter. Active locomotion enables only limited dispersal in these tiny, wingless arthropods, while passive dispersal plays an important role for long-distance dispersal. Previous investigations have focused on passive transport by wind, other animals, or sea currents, whereas studies on transport via running water are missing. However, ...
Published in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 3.95
Maxime Jacquot1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of La Réunion),
François Massol20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Lille University of Science and Technology)
+ -3 AuthorsJean-Philippe Deguine6
Estimated H-index: 6
Abstract Understanding the factors underlying biodiversity patterns is crucial to develop sustainable agroecosystems conserving diversity and the services it provides. The aim of our study was to identify multi-trophic interactions between arthropod trophic guilds in a tropical agroecosystem, while taking the effects of farming practices and landscape complexity into account. To do so, we conducted an experiment in 10 mango orchards on Reunion Island during three consecutive years. In each orcha...
Published on Mar 29, 2019in Nature Communications 11.88
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Anne Ebeling17
Estimated H-index: 17
(FSU: University of Jena)
+ 19 AuthorsFelix Fornoff4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Freiburg)
Humans modify ecosystems and biodiversity worldwide, with negative consequences for ecosystem functioning. Promoting plant diversity is increasingly suggested as a mitigation strategy. However, our mechanistic understanding of how plant diversity affects the diversity of heterotrophic consumer communities remains limited. Here, we disentangle the relative importance of key components of plant diversity as drivers of herbivore, predator, and parasitoid species richness in experimental forests and...
Published on May 1, 2019in Current opinion in insect science 3.78
Peng Han13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Christine Becker7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 3 AuthorsAnne-Violette Lavoir11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Abiotic and biotic factors affect plants in various ways which in turn affect associated arthropod communities through direct and indirect bottom–up interactions. Several reviews have synthesized studies examining the indirect effects of abiotic factors on plant–arthropod interactions, mainly focusing on soil nitrogen, soil water status, and climate change. However, these studies have mostly focused on bitrophic interactions, whereas most ecological systems are composed of at least three trophic...
Published on May 20, 2019in Cerne 0.80
Etienne Winagraski (UFPR: Federal University of Paraná), Glaciela Kaschuk15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná)
+ 2 AuthorsAntonio Rioyei Higa7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná)
Published on Apr 16, 2019in Forests 2.12
Songze Wan9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Zhanfeng Liu15
Estimated H-index: 15
+ 3 AuthorsJuan Liu
Soil microorganisms play key roles in ecosystems and respond quickly to environmental changes. Liming and/or understory removal are important forest management practices and have been widely applied to planted forests in humid subtropical and tropical regions of the world. However, few studies have explored the impacts of lime application, understory removal, and their interactive effects on soil microbial communities. We conducted a lime application experiment combined with understory removal i...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in New Phytologist 7.30
Jonathan A. Bennett14
Estimated H-index: 14
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan),
Jonathan A. Bennett1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan),
John N. Klironomos53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UBC: University of British Columbia)