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Country differences of psychosocial working conditions in Europe: the role of health and safety management practices

Published on Oct 1, 2017in International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 2.02
· DOI :10.1007/s00420-017-1225-z
Thorsten Lunau17
Estimated H-index: 17
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf),
Nico Dragano45
Estimated H-index: 45
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
+ 1 AuthorsMorten Wahrendorf19
Estimated H-index: 19
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
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Abstract
Background In times of demographic change, maintaining health and employability of older employees is important. In this context, studies show that stressful working conditions differ by countries. Yet, it is unclear if specific national management practices to deal with these conditions contribute towards explaining country differences.
  • References (24)
  • Citations (3)
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References24
Newest
Published on Feb 1, 2016in European Sociological Review 2.76
Mark L. Bryan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Essex),
Stephen P. Jenkins50
Estimated H-index: 50
(University of Essex)
Country effects on outcomes for individuals are often analysed using multilevel (hierarchical) models applied to harmonized multi-country data sets such as ESS, EU-SILC, EVS, ISSP, and SHARE. We point out problems with the assessment of country effects that appear not to be widely appreciated, and develop our arguments using Monte Carlo simulation analysis of multilevel linear and logit models. With large sample sizes of individuals within each country but only a small number of countries, analy...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in BMC Public Health 2.57
Töres Theorell76
Estimated H-index: 76
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
Anne Hammarström36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Umeå University)
+ 6 AuthorsCharlotte Hall3
Estimated H-index: 3
Background: Depressive symptoms are potential outcomes of poorly functioning work environments. Such symptoms are frequent and cause considerable suffering for the employees as well as financial loss for the employers. Accordingly good prospective studies of psychosocial working conditions and depressive symptoms are valuable. Scientific reviews of such studies have pointed at methodological difficulties but still established a few job risk factors. Those reviews were published some years ago. T...
Published on Mar 26, 2015in PLOS ONE 2.78
Thorsten Lunau17
Estimated H-index: 17
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf),
Johannes Siegrist68
Estimated H-index: 68
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
+ 1 AuthorsMorten Wahrendorf19
Estimated H-index: 19
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
Objectives Several studies report socioeconomic differences in work stress, where people in lower socioeconomic positions (SEP) are more likely to experience this burden. In the current study, we analyse associations between education and work stress in a large sample of workers from 16 European countries. In addition we explore whether distinct national labour market policies are related to smaller inequalities in work stress according to educational attainment. Methods We use data collected in...
Published on Dec 1, 2014in BMC Public Health 2.57
Morten Wahrendorf19
Estimated H-index: 19
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf),
Johannes Siegrist68
Estimated H-index: 68
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
Background While robust evidence on associations of stressful work with health exists, less research is available on determinants of stressful work in terms of respondents' characteristics (proximal factors) and in terms of national labour market policies (distal factors). In this article we analyse proximal (childhood circumstances and labour market disadvantage) and distal determinants (national compensation and integration policies) of stressful work in a comprehensive framework.
Published on Dec 1, 2013in International Journal of Epidemiology 7.34
Andrew Steptoe111
Estimated H-index: 111
(UCL: University College London),
Elizabeth Breeze34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UCL: University College London)
+ 1 AuthorsJames Nazroo52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCL: University College London)
The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) is a panel study of a representative cohort of men and women living in England aged ≥50 years. It was designed as a sister study to the Health and Retirement Study in the USA and is multidisciplinary in orientation, involving the collection of economic, social, psychological, cognitive, health, biological and genetic data. The study commenced in 2002, and the sample has been followed up every 2 years. Data are collected using computer-assisted pers...
Published on Aug 1, 2013in International Journal of Epidemiology 7.34
Axel Börsch-Supan40
Estimated H-index: 40
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Martina Brandt15
Estimated H-index: 15
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
+ 6 AuthorsSabrina Zuber1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
SHARE is a unique panel database of micro data on health, socio-economic status and social and family networks covering most of the European Union and Israel. To date, SHARE has collected three panel waves (2004, 2006, 2010) of current living circumstances and retrospective life histories (2008, SHARELIFE); 6 additional waves are planned until 2024. The more than 150 000 interviews give a broad picture of life after the age of 50 years, measuring physical and mental health, economic and non-econ...
Published on Jun 20, 2013in PLOS ONE 2.78
Solja T. Nyberg22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Finnish Institute of Occupational Health),
Eleonor I. Fransson28
Estimated H-index: 28
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
+ 24 AuthorsJane E. Ferrie76
Estimated H-index: 76
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Background: Job strain is associated with an increased coronary heart disease risk, but few large-scale studies have examined the relationship of this psychosocial characteristic with the biological risk factors that potentially mediate the job strain – heart disease association. Methodology and Principal Findings: We pooled cross-sectional, individual-level data from eight studies comprising 47,045 participants to investigate the association between job strain and the following cardiovascular d...
Published on Jan 14, 2013
Axel Börsch-Supan40
Estimated H-index: 40
,
Martina Brandt15
Estimated H-index: 15
+ 1 AuthorsGuglielmo Weber27
Estimated H-index: 27
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Frederic Malter5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Axel Börsch-Supan40
Estimated H-index: 40
Published on Oct 1, 2012in The Lancet 59.10
Mika Kivimaeki117
Estimated H-index: 117
(UCL: University College London),
Solja T. Nyberg22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)
+ 42 AuthorsAnnalisa Casini17
Estimated H-index: 17
(ULB: Université libre de Bruxelles)
Background Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies. Methods We used individual records from 13 European cohort studies (1985-2006) of men and women without coronary heart disease who were employed at time of baseline assessment. We m...
Cited By3
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Safety Science 3.62
Yannick Arnold Metzler1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Duisburg-Essen),
Georg von Groeling-Müller , Silja Bellingrath17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
Abstract Psychosocial risk assessment is becoming increasingly important for research and occupational health and safety due to legislative amendments obliging employers to implement psychosocial work factors into general risk assessment. While various sources provide guidance on hazard identification, statistically assessing the risk probability of psychosocial hazards remains poorly understood. In the current study, we investigate the risk potential of psychosocial hazards using the German Cop...
Wilza Karla dos Santos Leite1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UFPB: Federal University of Paraíba),
Anísio José da Silva Araújo3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UFPB: Federal University of Paraíba)
+ 5 AuthorsLuiz Bueno da Silva5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UFPB: Federal University of Paraíba)
The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of biomechanical, psychosocial, environmental and individual factors on local and multisite work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) symptoms among workers at a footwear manufacturing company. The sample comprised 267 workers. The results showed that: (a) age, sedentary lifestyle, inappropriate posture and perceived effort were associated with symptoms in the shoulders, and the combination of these factors increased the odds four-fold; (b...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Production Journal
Jonhatan Magno Norte da Silva1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UFSC: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina),
Luiz Bueno da Silva5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UFPB: Federal University of Paraíba),
Leila Amaral Gontijo6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UFSC: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina)