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Reliability of the electrocortical response to gains and losses in the doors task.

Published on Apr 1, 2017in Psychophysiology 3.38
· DOI :10.1111/psyp.12813
Amanda Levinson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Brittany C. Speed4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 1 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
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Abstract
The ability to differentiate between rewards and losses is critical for motivated action, and aberrant reward and loss processing has been associated with psychopathology. The reward positivity (RewP) and feedback negativity (FN) are ERPs elicited by monetary gains and losses, respectively, and are promising individual difference measures. However, few studies have reported on the psychometric properties of the RewP and FN—crucial characteristics necessary for valid individual difference measures. The current study examined the internal consistency and 1-week test-retest reliability of the RewP and FN as elicited by the doors task among 59 young adults. The RewP, FN, and their difference score (ΔRewP) all showed significant correlations between Time 1 and Time 2. The RewP and FN also achieved acceptable internal consistency at both time points within 20 trials using both Cronbach's α and a generalizability theory-derived dependability measure. Internal consistency for ΔRewP was notably weaker at both time points, which is expected from two highly intercorrelated constituent scores. In conclusion, the RewP and FN have strong psychometric properties in a healthy adult sample. Future research is needed to assess the psychometric properties of these ERPs in different age cohorts and in clinical populations.
  • References (41)
  • Citations (28)
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References41
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2017in International Journal of Psychophysiology 2.41
Peter E. Clayson18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Gregory A. Miller52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Abstract Failing to consider psychometric issues related to reliability and validity, differential deficits, and statistical power potentially undermines the conclusions of a study. In research using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), numerous contextual factors (population sampled, task, data recording, analysis pipeline, etc.) can impact the reliability of ERP scores. The present review considers the contextual factors that influence ERP score reliability and the downstream effects that re...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in International Journal of Psychophysiology 2.41
Peter E. Clayson18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Gregory A. Miller52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Abstract Generalizability theory (G theory) provides a flexible, multifaceted approach to estimating score reliability. G theory's approach to estimating score reliability has important advantages over classical test theory that are relevant for research using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For example, G theory does not require parallel forms (i.e., equal means, variances, and covariances), can handle unbalanced designs, and provides a single reliability estimate for designs with multip...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.65
Brady D. Nelson17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Greg Perlman12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
Objective:A blunted neural response to rewards has recently emerged as a potential mechanistic biomarker of adolescent depression. The reward positivity, an event-related potential elicited by feedback indicating monetary gain relative to loss, has been associated with risk for depression. The authors examined whether the reward positivity prospectively predicted the development of depression 18 months later in a large community sample of adolescent girls.Method:The sample included 444 girls 13....
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology 2.16
Ellen M. Kessel9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Lea R. Dougherty23
Estimated H-index: 23
+ 3 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
Abstract Objective: Reward-processing abnormalities are thought to be a key feature of various psychiatric disorders and may also play a role in disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD), a new diagnosis in DSM-5. In the current study, we used event-related potentials (ERP) sensitive to monetary gains (i.e., the reward positivity [RewP]) and losses (i.e., the N200) to examine associations between symptoms of DMDD during early childhood and later reward processing during preadolescence. Metho...
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Clinical Neurophysiology 3.67
Travis E. Baker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UdeM: Université de Montréal),
Jonathan M.A. Wood1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Clay B. Holroyd49
Estimated H-index: 49
(UVic: University of Victoria)
Abstract Objective Substance dependent (SD) relative to non-dependent (ND) individuals exhibit an attenuated reward positivity, an electrophysiological signal believed to index sensitivity of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to rewards. Here we asked whether this altered neural response reflects a specific devaluation of monetary rewards relative to drug-related rewards by ACC. Methods We recorded the reward positivity from SD and ND individuals who currently smoke, following an overnight period ...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Development and Psychopathology 3.59
Jennifer N. Bress9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Alexandria Meyer13
Estimated H-index: 13
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Greg Hajcak Proudfit22
Estimated H-index: 22
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential elicited by monetary reward and loss; it is thought to relate to reward-related neural activity and has been linked to depression in children and adults. In the current study, we examined the stability of FN, and its relationship with depression in adolescents, over 2 years in 45 8- to 13-year-old children. From Time 1 to Time 2, FN in response to monetary loss and in response to monetary gain showed moderate to strong reliability ( r s = .6...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 6.13
Ellen M. Kessel9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 1 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Background The relationship between reward sensitivity and pediatric anxiety is poorly understood. Evidence suggests that alterations in reward processing are more characteristic of depressive than anxiety disorders. However, some studies have reported that anxiety disorders are also associated with perturbations in reward processing. Heterogeneity in the forms of anxiety studied may account for the differences between studies. We used the feedback-negativity, an event-related potential sensitiv...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Psychophysiology 3.38
Greg Hajcak Proudfit22
Estimated H-index: 22
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Feedback indicating monetary loss elicits an apparent negative deflection in the event-related potential (ERP) that has been referred to as the feedback error-related negativity, medial frontal negativity, feedback-related negativity, and feedback negativity—all conceptualizations that suggest a negative ERP component that is greater for loss than gain. In the current paper, I review a programmatic line of research indicating that this apparent negativity actually reflects a reward-related posit...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Psychiatry Research-neuroimaging 2.21
Patrizia Thoma18
Estimated H-index: 18
(RUB: Ruhr University Bochum),
Marc-Andreas Edel13
Estimated H-index: 13
(RUB: Ruhr University Bochum)
+ 1 AuthorsChristian Bellebaum22
Estimated H-index: 22
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
Abstract Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is hypothesized to be characterized by altered reinforcement sensitivity. The main aim of the present study was to assess alterations in the electrophysiological correlates of monetary reward processing in adult patients with ADHD of the combined subtype. Fourteen adults with ADHD of the combined subtype and 14 healthy control participants performed an active and an observational probabilistic reward-based learning task while an electroenc...
Published on Jun 16, 2014in PLOS ONE 2.78
Jingbo Gong3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CSU: Central South University),
Jiajin Yuan17
Estimated H-index: 17
(SWU: Southwest University)
+ 3 AuthorsXue-rong Luo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CSU: Central South University)
Objective The current model of ADHD suggests abnormal reward and punishment sensitivity, although differences in ADHD subgroups are unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of feedback valence (reward or punishment) and punishment magnitude (small or large) on Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) and Late Positive Potential (LPP) in two subtypes of ADHD (ADHD-C and ADHD-I) compared to typically developing children (TD) during a children's gambling task.
Cited By28
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2019in Journal of Affective Disorders 4.08
Brian J. Albanese9
Estimated H-index: 9
(FSU: Florida State University),
Richard J. Macatee12
Estimated H-index: 12
(FSU: Florida State University)
+ 5 AuthorsNorman B. Schmidt63
Estimated H-index: 63
(FSU: Florida State University)
Abstract Background Theories of suicide posit distinct etiological pathways for suicide attempts (SA) and suicidal ideation (SI) that are marked, in part, by disruptions in the ability to regulate reactions to threat/mutilation and interpersonally-relevant emotional stimuli. However, little research has specifically tested these associations. To address this gap, the present study extracted the Late Positive Potential (LPP) during an emotion regulation task to evaluate the independent associatio...
Published in Psychophysiology 3.38
Samantha Pegg (Vandy: Vanderbilt University), Lindsay Dickey (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)+ -3 AuthorsAutumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Kreshnik Burani (FSU: Florida State University), Julia Klawohn7
Estimated H-index: 7
(FSU: Florida State University)
+ 3 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University)
Published on Jul 8, 2019in Psychological Medicine 5.64
Victoria Lawlor , Christian A. Webb16
Estimated H-index: 16
+ 4 AuthorsDaniel G. Dillon20
Estimated H-index: 20
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Psychophysiology 3.38
Michael P Berry , Ema Tanovic2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsCharles A. Sanislow57
Estimated H-index: 57
Published on Apr 5, 2019in Psychophysiology 3.38
Colin B. Bowyer (FSU: Florida State University), Keanan J. Joyner3
Estimated H-index: 3
(FSU: Florida State University)
+ 3 AuthorsChristopher J. Patrick67
Estimated H-index: 67
(FSU: Florida State University)
Published on May 7, 2018in Addiction Biology 4.22
Richard J. Macatee12
Estimated H-index: 12
(FSU: Florida State University),
Sarah A. Okey1
Estimated H-index: 1
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 2 AuthorsJesse R. Cougle29
Estimated H-index: 29
(FSU: Florida State University)
Brian J. Albanese9
Estimated H-index: 9
(FSU: Florida State University),
Richard J. Macatee (AU: Auburn University)+ 3 AuthorsNorman B. Schmidt63
Estimated H-index: 63
(FSU: Florida State University)
Abstract Background Existing research suggests inhibitory control deficits may differentiate individuals who think about suicide from those who make a suicide attempt. However, no available research, to our knowledge, has examined whether suicidal behaviors are associated with disruptions in the ability to determine when inhibitory control is needed or the ability to engage inhibition of an inappropriate or maladaptive behavior. The current study utilized event-related potentials to investigate ...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Clinical Psychology Review 9.90
Samuel F. Acuff3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of M: University of Memphis),
Ashley A. Dennhardt12
Estimated H-index: 12
(U of M: University of Memphis)
+ 1 AuthorsJames G. Murphy34
Estimated H-index: 34
(U of M: University of Memphis)
Abstract A robust body of theoretical and experimental work highlights the influence of alternative, substance-free rewards on decisions to use alcohol and other drugs. However, translational applications have been limited in part by the lack of consensus on how to measure substance-free reinforcement in applied and clinical settings. The current study summarizes extant research utilizing self-report reinforcement or reward methodologies, and critically reviews the psychometric properties of the...
Published on May 31, 2019in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 2.62
Brent I. Rappaport (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis), Laura Hennefield1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
+ 5 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
Peer victimization (or bullying) is a known risk factor for depression, especially among youth. However, the mechanisms connecting victimization experience to depression symptoms remains unknown. As depression is known to be associated with neural blunting to monetary rewards, aberrant responsiveness to social rewards may be a key deficit connecting socially stressful experiences with later depression. We therefore sought to determine whether adolescents’ experiences with social stress would be ...