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Greg Hajcak
Florida State University
248Publications
64H-index
15.3kCitations
Publications 248
Newest
Alexandria Meyer13
Estimated H-index: 13
(FSU: Florida State University),
Greg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University)
E. David Klonsky34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Sarah E. Victor7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University)
Emotion research would benefit from a self-report measure that assesses both discrete emotions and broad dimensions, takes into account the time-course of emotional experience, and distinguishes emotional reactivity and regulation. The present study describes the development and psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Emotion Questionnaire (MEQ), which was designed to address these needs. The MEQ assesses: (a) two superordinate dimensions of emotional reactivity (positive and negative), ...
Kreshnik Burani (FSU: Florida State University), Julia Klawohn7
Estimated H-index: 7
(FSU: Florida State University)
+ 3 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University)
Amanda Levinson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Brittany C. Speed4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Greg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University)
Adolescent girls are at increased risk for depression, which is thought to result from the interaction of biological vulnerabilities and life stressors common to adolescent girls. A blunted late positive potential (LPP) to emotional stimuli (i.e., pleasant and unpleasant) has been associated with depressive symptoms and risk. The current study of adolescent girls examines the moderating effects of the LPP, a candidate biomarker of depression, of the link between life stress and increases in depr...
Published on Feb 27, 2019in Psychophysiology 3.38
Katherine R. Luking11
Estimated H-index: 11
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Zachary P. Infantolino3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 1 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University)
Published on Feb 22, 2019in Psychophysiology 3.38
Erik M. Benau6
Estimated H-index: 6
(KU: University of Kansas),
Kaylin E. Hill2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Purdue University)
+ 5 AuthorsDan Foti25
Estimated H-index: 25
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Published on Apr 5, 2019in Psychophysiology 3.38
Colin B. Bowyer (FSU: Florida State University), Keanan J. Joyner3
Estimated H-index: 3
(FSU: Florida State University)
+ 3 AuthorsChristopher J. Patrick67
Estimated H-index: 67
(FSU: Florida State University)
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Psychophysiology 3.38
Aiden M. Payne1
Estimated H-index: 1
(The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering),
Lena H. Ting33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Emory University),
Greg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University)
Published on Jun 11, 2019in Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience 2.66
Cameron D. Hassall6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UVic: University of Victoria),
Greg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(FSU: Florida State University),
Olave E. Krigolson10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UVic: University of Victoria)
Converging evidence suggests that reinforcement learning (RL) signals exist within the human brain and that they play a role in the modification of behaviour. According to RL theory, prediction errors are used to update values associated with actions and/or predictive cues, thus facilitate decision-making. For example, the reward positivity—a feedback-sensitive component of the event-related brain potential (ERP)—is thought to index an RL prediction error. An unresolved question, however, is whe...
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