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Workplace stressors & health outcomes: Health policy for the workplace

Published on Jan 1, 2015
· DOI :10.1353/bsp.2015.0001
Joel Goh9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Jeffrey Pfeffer82
Estimated H-index: 82
,
Stefanos A. Zenios27
Estimated H-index: 27
Abstract
Extensive research focuses on the causes of workplace-induced stress. However, policy efforts to tackle the ever-increasing health costs and poor health outcomes in the United States have largely ignored the health effects of psychosocial workplace stressors such as high job demands, economic insecurity, and long work hours. Using meta-analysis, we summarize 228 studies assessing the effects of ten workplace stressors on four health outcomes. We find that job insecurity increases the odds of reporting poor health by about 50%, high job demands raise the odds of having a physician-diagnosed illness by 35%, and long work hours increase mortality by almost 20%. Therefore, policies designed to reduce health costs and improve health outcomes should account for the health effects of the workplace environment.
  • References (58)
  • Citations (16)
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References58
Newest
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Management Science 3.54
Joel Goh9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Harvard University),
Jeffrey Pfeffer82
Estimated H-index: 82
(Stanford University),
Stefanos A. Zenios27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Stanford University)
Even though epidemiological evidence links specific workplace stressors to health outcomes, the aggregate contribution of these factors to overall mortality and health spending in the United States is not known. In this paper, we build a model to estimate the excess mortality and incremental health expenditures associated with exposure to the following 10 workplace stressors: unemployment, lack of health insurance, exposure to shift work, long working hours, job insecurity, work–family conflict,...
54 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 4, 2014
Oar14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Oria9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Ied9
Estimated H-index: 9
This page contains a PDF version of the Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking report.
67 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Health Affairs 4.84
John P. Caloyeras8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Frederick S. Pardee RAND Graduate School),
Hangsheng Liu9
Estimated H-index: 9
(AN: RAND Corporation)
+ 2 AuthorsSoeren Mattke23
Estimated H-index: 23
(AN: RAND Corporation)
Workplace wellness programs are increasingly popular. Employers expect them to improve employee health and well-being, lower medical costs, increase productivity, and reduce absenteeism. To test whether such expectations are warranted, we evaluated the cost impact of the lifestyle and disease management components of PepsiCo’s wellness program, Healthy Living. We found that seven years of continuous participation in one or both components was associated with an average reduction of $30 in health...
58 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health 2.79
Akira Bannai3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Hokkaido University),
Akiko Tamakoshi62
Estimated H-index: 62
(Hokkaido University)
Objectives Many studies have investigated the association between long working hours and health. By focusing on differences in the definition of long working hours and the influence of shift work, we attempt to explain why the results of these studies remain inconclusive. Methods We defined long working hours as working time greater than around 40 hours per week or 8 hours per day. Since previous studies have indicated that shift work is detrimental to health, we minimized the influence of shift...
151 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 28, 2013
Soeren Mattke23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Huaying Liu6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 4 AuthorsVictoria Shier13
Estimated H-index: 13
74 Citations
Published on Aug 8, 2013in BMJ 23.56
Marianna Virtanen59
Estimated H-index: 59
(Finnish Institute of Occupational Health),
Solja T. Nyberg22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)
+ 43 AuthorsHermann Burr40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)
To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease. A meta-analysis combining individual level data from a collaborative consortium and published studies identified by a systematic review. We obtained individual level data from 13 cohort studies participating in the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium. Four published prospective cohort studies were identified by searches of Medline (to August 2012) and Emb...
84 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Journal of Management 8.08
Daniel C. Ganster36
Estimated H-index: 36
(CSU: Colorado State University),
Christopher C. Rosen20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UA: University of Arkansas)
Research examining the relationship between work stress and well-being has flourished over the past 20 years. At the same time, research on physiological stress processes has also advanced significantly. One of the major advances in this literature has been the emergence of the Allostatic Load model as a central organizing theory for understanding the physiology of stress. In this article, the Allostatic Load model is used as an organizing framework for reviewing the vast literature that has con...
205 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 5.73
Alia J. Crum9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Yale University),
Peter Salovey85
Estimated H-index: 85
(Yale University),
Shawn Achor1
Estimated H-index: 1
This article describes 3 studies that explore the role of mindsets in the context of stress. In Study 1, we present data supporting the reliability and validity of an 8-item instrument, the Stress Mindset Measure (SMM), designed to assess the extent to which an individual believes that the effects of stress are either enhancing or debilitating. In Study 2, we demonstrate that stress mindsets can be altered by watching short, multimedia film clips presenting factual information biased toward defi...
140 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2012in The Lancet 53.25
Mika Kivimaeki117
Estimated H-index: 117
(UCL: University College London),
Solja T. Nyberg22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)
+ 42 AuthorsAnnalisa Casini17
Estimated H-index: 17
(ULB: Université libre de Bruxelles)
Background Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies. Methods We used individual records from 13 European cohort studies (1985-2006) of men and women without coronary heart disease who were employed at time of baseline assessment. We m...
471 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2012in Medical Care 3.34
John A. Nyman31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Jean Marie Abraham16
Estimated H-index: 16
+ 1 AuthorsNathan A. Barleen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
24 Citations Source Cite
Cited By16
Newest
Published on May 7, 2019in Journal of Business and Psychology 2.58
Yasin Rofcanin5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Mireia Las Heras2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Navarra)
+ 1 AuthorsTaryn L. Stanko3
Estimated H-index: 3
(California Polytechnic State University)
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Published on Nov 26, 2018in Frontiers in Public Health
Merilyn Lock (UniSA: University of South Australia), Dannielle Post1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UniSA: University of South Australia)
+ 1 AuthorsGaynor Parfitt30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UniSA: University of South Australia)
Despite the well-established benefits of regular participation in physical activity, many Australians still fail to maintain sufficient levels. More self-determined types of motivation and more positive affect during activity have been found to be associated with the maintenance of physical activity behaviour over time. Need-supportive approaches to physical activity behaviour change have previously been shown to improve quality of motivation and psychological wellbeing. This paper outlines the ...
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Published on Sep 20, 2018in Sa Journal of Human Resource Management
John K. Aderibigbe (University of Fort Hare), Themba Q. Mjoli2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Fort Hare)
Orientation: It is a documented fact that occupational stress is widespread worldwide. Moreover, there are clear signs of many variables that affect Nigerian graduate employees, which are most likely to cause severe occupational stress, and this, in turn, could negatively affect employees and their organisational ability to demonstrate citizenship behaviour. Research purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: firstly, to examine the nature of relationship between occupational stress and org...
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Published on Mar 1, 2018in Society and mental health 0.96
Marisa Young12
Estimated H-index: 12
(McMaster University),
Shirin Montazer3
Estimated H-index: 3
(WSU: Wayne State University)
The neighborhood context is considered a key institution of inequality influencing individuals’ exposure and psychological vulnerability to stressors in the work-family interface, including work-family conflict (WFC). However, experiences of neighborhood context, WFC, and its mental health consequences among minority populations—including foreign-born residents—remain unexplored. We address this limitation and draw on tenants of the stress process model to unpack our hypotheses. We further test ...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 23, 2018in Journal of Medical Internet Research 4.67
Paulino Jimenez1
Estimated H-index: 1
Background: Electronic health (eHealth) and mobile health (mHealth) tools can support and improve the whole process of workplace health promotion (WHP) projects. However, several challenges and opportunities have to be considered while integrating these tools in WHP projects. Currently, a large number of eHealth tools are developed for changing health behavior, but these tools can support the whole WHP process, including group administration, information flow, assessment, intervention developmen...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 14, 2017in Journal of Applied Psychology 4.64
Jingqiu Chen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SJTU: Shanghai Jiao Tong University),
Peter A. Bamberger33
Estimated H-index: 33
(TAU: Tel Aviv University)
+ 1 AuthorsDana R. Vashdi10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Haifa)
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Research Policy 4.66
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UGent: Ghent University),
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 2 AuthorsLydia Gisle7
Estimated H-index: 7
Research policy observers are increasingly concerned about the potential impact of current academic working conditions on mental health, particularly in PhD students. The aim of the current study is threefold. First, we assess the prevalence of mental health problems in a representative sample of PhD students in Flanders, Belgium (N = 3659). Second, we compare PhD students to three other samples: (1) highly educated in the general population (N = 769); (2) highly educated employees (N = 592); an...
52 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Social Science Research 1.77
Shirin Montazer3
Estimated H-index: 3
(WSU: Wayne State University),
Marisa Young12
Estimated H-index: 12
(McMaster University)
Abstract Using a sample of employed adults living in Canada, this article examines patterns and antecedents of work-to-family conflict (WFC) among immigrants, relative to the native-born. We test whether the origin-country— or intermediary country of residence— country-level economic development, and length of residence in Canada interact to affect WFC differentially for immigrants. We hypothesize that origin-country economic development impacts the value and transferability of immigrants' capit...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 6.75
Sherry Pinkstaff15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UNF: University of North Florida),
Amy McNeil6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
+ 1 AuthorsLawrence P. Cahalin21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UM: University of Miami)
Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are five of the top ten causes of death for Americans: cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, lower respiratory disease, stroke and diabetes mellitus. Risk factors for these NCDs and for CVD are tobacco use, poor diet quality, physical inactivity, increase body mass index, increased blood pressure, increased blood cholesterol, and glucose intolerance. Depression, depressive symptoms and anxiety also contribute to CVD risk. There is also evidence work stress itself...
2 Citations Source Cite