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Carbon cycle perturbation expressed in terrestrial Permian–Triassic boundary sections in South China

Published on Jan 1, 2017in Global and Planetary Change4.10
· DOI :10.1016/j.gloplacha.2015.10.018
Ying Cui8
Estimated H-index: 8
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Antoine Bercovici2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Smithsonian Institution)
+ 4 AuthorsVivi Vajda-Santivanez21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Lund University)
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Abstract
Stable isotopes of inorganic and organic carbon are commonly used in chemostratigraphy to correlate marine and terrestrial sedimentary sequences based on the assumption that the carbon isotopic signature of the exogenic carbon pool dominates other sources of variability. Here, sediment samples from four Permian–Triassic boundary (PTB) sections of western Guizhou and eastern Yunnan provinces in South China, representing a terrestrial to marine transitional setting, were analyzed for δ13C of organic matter (δ13Corg). These values were subsequently compared to published δ13C values of carbonates (δ13Ccarb) from the Global Stratotype Section and Point at Meishan and many other marine and terrestrial sections. A similar isotopic trend evident through all four sections is characterized by a negative shift of 2–3‰ at the top of the Xuanwei Formation, where we tentatively place the PTB. This negative shift also corresponds to a turnover in the vegetation and the occurrence of fungal spores, which is generally interpreted as a proliferation of decomposers and collapse of complex ecosystems during the end-Permian mass extinction event. Moreover, the absolute values of δ13Corg are more extreme in the more distal (marine) deposits. The δ13Corg values for the studied sediments are more variable compared to coeval δ13Ccarb records from marine records especially in the interval below the extinction horizon. We contend that the depositional environment influenced the δ13Corg values, but that the persisting geographic δ13Corg pattern through the extinction event across the four independent sections is an indication that the atmospheric δ13C signal left an indelible imprint on the geologic record related to the profound ecosystem change during the end-Permian extinction event.
  • References (144)
  • Citations (14)
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References144
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Hua Zhang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Changqun Cao21
Estimated H-index: 21
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 6 AuthorsShu-zhong Shen31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The end-Permian mass extinction reflects the most severe life crisis during the Phanerozoic and was associated with major global environmental changes. However, the consistency of the time and pattern of the terrestrial and marine extinctions remains controversial. In this paper, we presented detailed analyses of the high-resolution biostratigraphical and geochemical data from terrestrial sections in South China. Our analyses show that the transitional Kayitou Formation actually recorde...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Earth-Science Reviews9.53
Jianxin Yu12
Estimated H-index: 12
(China University of Geosciences),
Jean Broutin20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Paris)
+ 4 AuthorsQisheng Huang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences)
Abstract This paper reviews critically the Permian–Triassic (P–Tr) fossil plants and microflora recorded in three well-studied terrestrial Permian–Triassic boundary (PTB) sections, namely Chahe, Zhejue, and Jiucaichong, and two marine–terrestrial transitional PTB sections, namely Mide and Tucheng, in western Guizhou Province and eastern Yunnan Province (WGEY), Southwest China. Distinct floral composition, abundance and diversity across the PTB allow the establishment of two terrestrial macroflor...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Earth-Science Reviews9.53
Ying Cui8
Estimated H-index: 8
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Lee R. Kump53
Estimated H-index: 53
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract The mass extinction event that occurred at the close of the Permian Period (~ 252 million years ago) represents the most severe biodiversity loss in the ocean of the Phanerozoic. The links between the global carbon cycle, climate change and mass extinction are complex and involve a whole range of often inter-related geochemical, biological, ecologic and climatic factors. It has become widely accepted that the end-Permian mass extinction was associated with a global warming event, becaus...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Science Advances
Seth D. Burgess8
Estimated H-index: 8
(MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology),
Samuel A. Bowring69
Estimated H-index: 69
(MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe in the Phanerozoic, extinguishing more than 90% of marine and 75% of terrestrial species in a maximum of 61 ± 48 ky. Because of broad temporal coincidence between the biotic crisis and one of the most voluminous continental volcanic eruptions since the origin of animals, the Siberian Traps large igneous province (LIP), a causal connection has long been suggested. Magmatism is hypothesized to have caused rapid injection of massive amounts of gre...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Gondwana Research6.48
Ian Metcalfe31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UNE: University of New England (Australia)),
Jim Crowley4
Estimated H-index: 4
(BSU: Boise State University)
+ 1 AuthorsMark D. Schmitz37
Estimated H-index: 37
(BSU: Boise State University)
Abstract Twenty-eight new high-precision Chemical Abrasion Isotope Dilution Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry U-Pb zircon dates for tuffs in the Sydney and Bowen Basins are reported. Based on these new dates, the Guadalupian-Lopingian/Capitanian-Wuchiapingian boundary is tentatively placed at the level of the Thirroul Sandstone in the lower part of the Illawarra Coal Measures in the Sydney Basin. The Wuchiapingian-Changhsingian boundary is at or close to the Kembla Sandstone horizon in the Il...
Published on Apr 10, 2015in Science41.04
Matthew O Clarkson8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
Simone A. Kasemann21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Bremen)
+ 7 AuthorsEdward T. Tipper17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Cambridge)
Ocean acidification triggered by Siberian Trap volcanism was a possible kill mechanism for the Permo-Triassic Boundary mass extinction, but direct evidence for an acidification event is lacking. We present a high-resolution seawater pH record across this interval, using boron isotope data combined with a quantitative modeling approach. In the latest Permian, increased ocean alkalinity primed the Earth system with a low level of atmospheric CO2 and a high ocean buffering capacity. The first phase...
Published on Feb 1, 2015in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences2.76
Antoine Bercovici12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Lund University),
Ying Cui8
Estimated H-index: 8
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
+ 2 AuthorsVivi Vajda-Santivanez21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Lund University)
Well-preserved marine fossils in carbonate rocks permit detailed studies of the end-Permian extinction event in the marine realm. However, the rarity of fossils in terrestrial depositional environments makes it more challenging to attain a satisfactory degree of resolution to describe the biotic turnover on land. Here we present new sedimentological, paleontological and geochemical (X-ray fluorescence) analysis from the study of four terrestrial sections (Chahe, Zhejue, Mide and Jiucaichong) in ...
Published on Jan 1, 2015
Ying Cui8
Estimated H-index: 8
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Lee R. Kump53
Estimated H-index: 53
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Andy Ridgwell52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta4.26
Heather V. Graham4
Estimated H-index: 4
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Mark E. Patzkowsky31
Estimated H-index: 31
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
+ 3 AuthorsKatherine H. Freeman51
Estimated H-index: 51
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract The geologic history of closed-canopy forests is of great interest to paleoecologists and paleoclimatologists alike. Closed canopies have pronounced effects on local, continental and global rainfall and temperature patterns. Although evidence for canopy closure is difficult to reconstruct from the fossil record, the characteristic isotope gradients of the “canopy effect” could be preserved in leaves and proxy biomarkers. To assess this, we employed new carbon isotopic data for leaves co...
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Global and Planetary Change4.10
Vivi Vajda-Santivanez21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Lund University),
Antoine Bercovici12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Lund University)
Changes in pollen and spore assemblages across the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary elucidate the vegetation response to a global environmental crisis triggered by an asteroid impact in Mexico 66 Ma. The Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary clay, associated with the Chicxulub asteroid impact event, constitutes a unique, global marker bed enabling comparison of the world-wide palynological signal spanning the mass extinction event. The data from both hemispheres are consistent, revealing diverse lat...
Cited By14
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Nature Communications11.88
Christopher R. Fielding39
Estimated H-index: 39
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln),
Tracy D. Frank25
Estimated H-index: 25
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)
+ 8 AuthorsRobert S. Nicoll20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Geoscience Australia)
Past studies of the end-Permian extinction (EPE), the largest biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic, have not resolved the timing of events in southern high-latitudes. Here we use palynology coupled with high-precision CA-ID-TIMS dating of euhedral zircons from continental sequences of the Sydney Basin, Australia, to show that the collapse of the austral Permian Glossopteris flora occurred prior to 252.3 Ma (~370 kyrs before the main marine extinction). Weathering proxies indicate that floristic chan...
Published on May 1, 2019in Gondwana Research6.48
Jun Chen6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Yi-Gang Xu53
Estimated H-index: 53
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Current understanding of biodiversity changes in the Permian is presented, especially the consensus and disagreement on the tempo, duration, and pattern of end-Guadalupian and end-Permian mass extinctions. The end-Guadalupian mass extinction (EGME; i.e., pre-Lopingian crisis) is not as severe as previously thought. Moreover, the turnovers of major fossil groups occurred at different temporal levels, therefore the total duration of the end-Guadalupian mass extinction is relatively extend...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta4.26
Baozhi Lin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(ETH Zurich),
Zhifei Liu25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Tongji University)
+ 4 AuthorsGert J. de Lange37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Tongji University)
Abstract Large river systems accumulate, process, and transport huge quantities of organic matter (OM) from their catchments, part of which is exported to the ocean. Although this suite of processes comprises an important component of the global carbon cycle, integrated studies examining the nature and extent of OM processing on a basin-wide scale remain rare. Here, we provide an overview of provenance and composition of OM in suspended and deposited sediments within the Pearl River watershed in...
Published on May 1, 2019in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences2.76
Jungang Peng2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jianguo Li9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsVivi Vajda-Santivanez21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Swedish Museum of Natural History)
Abstract We present vegetation reconstructions based on an almost complete succession through the Triassic of Tulong, Nyalam County, southern Xizang (Tibet), China. The Permian and earliest Triassic samples were barren of palynomorphs, however, in overlying strata we identified well-preserved and diverse miospore assemblages. Seven pollen and spore zones spanning the Olenekian to the Rhaetian were recognized. These palynological zones were amalgamated into three floral stages that comprise disti...
Published on May 1, 2019in Palaeoworld1.14
Frank Scholze4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Kazan: Kazan Federal University),
Shu-zhong Shen31
Estimated H-index: 31
(NU: Nanjing University)
+ 5 AuthorsJoerg W. Schneider8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kazan: Kazan Federal University)
Abstract Sedimentary deposits of the Permian–Triassic transition are well-exposed in numerous outcrops of South China. Depending on the palaeogeographic positions of the sections, their lithofacies vary from fully marine, shallow marine, lagoonal, lacustrine, and fluvial to alluvial. In the present study, conchostracans (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) were newly collected from the continental deposits of the Kayitou and Jialingjiang formations around the Kangdian Highland elevated by the Emeishan Basa...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Ting Song2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences),
Jinnan Tong26
Estimated H-index: 26
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 2 AuthorsYunfei Huang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Yangtze University)
Abstract Immediately after the latest Permian mass extinction, bivalve faunas colonized the Permian-Triassic Transitional Beds (PTTB), especially in littoral clastic facies of South China. The Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) transitional bivalve fauna is composed of holdovers, long-term survivors and newly evolved taxa, and characterized by moderate diversity and high dominance. However, the taxonomy and ecology of this bivalve fauna of littoral clastic facies have not been well understood, especially i...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Hua Zhang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Zhuo Feng11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Yunnan University)
+ 1 AuthorsShu-zhong Shen31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The terrestrial Permian-Triassic transitional section at Chahe in western Guizhou Province, South China has served as a key reference section for the study of terrestrial PTB, as well as the end-Permian mass extinction on land in South China. However, Bourquin et al. (2018) recently reported that the PTB interval at Chahe has undergone serious tectonic deformation and thus is not suitable for studying the PTB transition or the terrestrial end-Permian extinction due to an unknown amount ...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Sylvie Bourquin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique),
Camille Rossignol4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFOP: Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto)
+ 3 AuthorsJianxin Yu12
Estimated H-index: 12
(China University of Geosciences)
Abstract In their comment, Zhang et al. (2018) question the existence of the deformation structures that we report for the upper part of the Chahe Permian-Triassic Boundary reference section. These authors further suggest that this deformation contradicts the regional litho, bio- and chemostratigraphic results. Here again, and based on the outcrop picture provided by Zhang et al. (2018), we present new arguments attesting for a major tectonic deformation in the upper part of the Chahe section. W...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Journal of African Earth Sciences1.63
Michael Brookfield7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst),
Alan G. Stebbins (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)+ 1 AuthorsRobyn E. Hannigan5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)
Abstract We performed analyses of C org , N org , δ 13 C org , and δ 15 N org from the non-marine Permian-Triassic boundary section at Carlton Heights in the Karoo Basin, South Africa. The Carlton Heights section is thus far unique in the Karoo in containing the Permian-Triassic palynological boundary between the Upper Permian Klausipollenites schaubergeri Zone and the Lower Triassic Kraeuselisporites-Lunatisporites Zone, separated by a 1-m thick “fungal event” zone, marked by abundant fungal ce...
Published on Jul 3, 2018in Alcheringa1.02
Ratan Kar1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Amit K. Ghosh6
Estimated H-index: 6
Kar, R. & Ghosh, A.K., May 2018. First record of Reduviasporonites from the Permian–Triassic transition (Gondwana Supergroup) of India. Alcheringa XX, XXX–XXX. ISSN 0311-5518.We have performed a palynological study from an outcrop succession within the Gondwana Supergroup in India, spanning the end-Permian event. The sampled succession is located within the Tatapani-Ramkola Coalfield, in the Balrampur District of Chhattisgarh State, India. Diverse and well-preserved palynological assemblages rep...
View next paperHigh-resolution terrestrial Permian–Triassic eventostratigraphic boundary in western Guizhou and eastern Yunnan, southwestern China