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Does Dopamine Replacement Medication Affect Postural Sequence Learning in Parkinson’s Disease?

Published on Oct 1, 2015in Motor Control1.302
· DOI :10.1123/mc.2014-0039
Heather Hayes6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UofU: University of Utah),
Nikelle Hunsaker2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UofU: University of Utah)
+ 8 AuthorsLeland E. Dibble27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UofU: University of Utah)
Abstract
Deficits in sequence-specific learning (SSL) may be a product of Parkinson’s disease (PD) but this deficit could also be related to dopamine replacement. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dopamine replacement affected acquisition and retention of a standing Continuous Tracking Task in individuals with PD. SSL (difference between random/repeated Root Mean Square Error across trials) was calculated over 2 days of practice and 1 day of retention for 4 groups; 10 healthy young (HY), 10 healthy elders, 10 individuals with PD on, 9 individuals with PD off their usual dosage of dopamine replacement. Improvements in acquisition were observed for all groups; however, only the HY demonstrated retention. Therefore, age appeared to have the largest effect on SSL with no significant effect of medication. Additional research is needed to understand the influence of factors such as practice amount, task difficulty, and dopamine replacement status on SSL deficits during postural tasks.
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  • Citations (10)
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Cited By10
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#1Serene S. Paul (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 16
#2Leland E. Dibble (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 27
Last. Sydney Y. Schaefer (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 13
view all 6 authors...
ABSTRACT Background Dopamine replacement medication has positive effects on existing motor skills for people with Parkinson disease (PD), but may have detrimental effects on the learning of motor skills necessary for effective rehabilitation according to the dopamine overdose hypothesis. Objectives This study aimed to determine whether dopamine replacement medication (i.e. levodopa) affects: learning of a novel upper extremity task, decrements in skill following withdrawal of practice, the rate ...
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#1Markey Olson (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 2
#2Thurmon E. Lockhart (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 24
Last. Abraham Lieberman (St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center)H-Index: 18
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Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurological disorder traditionally associated with degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra, which results in bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and postural instability and gait disability (PIGD). The disorder has also been implicated in degradation of motor learning. While individuals with PD are able to learn, certain aspects of learning, especially automatic responses to feedback, are faulty, resulting in a reliance on feedforward syste...
3 CitationsSource
#1Serene S. Paul (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 16
#2Sydney Y. SchaeferH-Index: 13
Last. Leland E. Dibble (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 27
view all 6 authors...
Introduction. Treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with exogenous dopamine (ie, levodopa) may positively affect motor symptoms, but may negatively affect other functions such as the learning of mo...
1 CitationsSource
#1Heather Hayes (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 6
#2Shantae George (UofU: University of Utah)
Last. Leland E. Dibble (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 27
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Background Sequence-specific learning (SSL); the ability to implicitly integrate repeated sequences compared to random sequences during a motor sequence paradigm, is impaired in healthy elders (HE) compared to healthy young (HY). Prior studies have provided limited practice (small repetitions and only 1 to 3 days). Research question Using a standing, postural control task we sought to assess if more practice (7 days) would remediate the differences observed in SSL for HE. Methods We use...
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#1Deborah A. Jehu (U of O: University of Ottawa)H-Index: 5
#2Hiram Cantú (McGill University)H-Index: 1
Last. Julie Nantel (U of O: University of Ottawa)H-Index: 3
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#1Serene S. Paul (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 16
#2Leland E. Dibble (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 27
Last. Daniel S. Peterson (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 14
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Abstract Background Falls are a significant burden for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), however, individuals across the spectrum of disease severity respond differently to fall prevention interventions. Despite the multifactorial causes of falls in people with PD, recent work has provided insight into interventions that hold promise for fall prevention. Further, studies have begun to identify patient characteristics that may predict responsiveness to such interventions. Research question We...
8 CitationsSource
#1Mark E. Lester (Baylor University)H-Index: 2
#2James T. Cavanaugh (UNE: University of New England (United States))H-Index: 17
Last. Leland E. Dibble (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 27
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Abstract Background The ability to adapt postural responses to sensory illusions diminishes with age and is further impaired by Parkinson disease. However, limited information exists regarding training-related adaptions of sensory reweighting in these populations. Methods This study sought to determine whether Parkinson disease or age would differentially affect acute postural recovery or adaptive postural responses to novel or repeated exposure to sensory illusions using galvanic vestibular sti...
2 CitationsSource
#1Karen Van Ooteghem (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 5
#2James S. Frank (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 32
Last. Fay B. Horak (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 82
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Abstract Introduction Although balance training is considered the most effective treatment for balance impairments in Parkinson’s disease (PD), few studies have examined if learning for balance control remains intact with PD. This study aimed to determine if learning for automatic postural responses is preserved in people with PD. Methods Eleven participants with moderate PD (68 ± 6.4 years; H&Y: 2–3) on their usual medication maintained balance on a platform that oscillated forward and backward...
3 CitationsSource
#1Daniel S. Peterson (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 14
#2Bauke W. Dijkstra (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 1
Last. Fay B. Horak (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 82
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Protective postural responses to external perturbations are hypokinetic in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and improving these responses may reduce falls. However, the ability of people with PD to improve postural responses with practice is poorly understood. Our objective was to determine whether people with PD can improve protective postural responses similarly to healthy adults through repeated perturbations, and whether improvements are retained or generalize to untrained perturbations...
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#1Daniel S. Peterson (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 14
#2Fay B. Horak (OHSU: Oregon Health & Science University)H-Index: 82
14 CitationsSource