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Examining the Effects of Language Brokering on Student Identities and Learning Opportunities in Dual Immersion Classrooms

Published on Nov 1, 2011in Journal of Language Identity and Education0.74
· DOI :10.1080/15348458.2011.614544
Jin Sook Lee2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara),
Laura Hill-Bonnet1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Stanford University),
Jason Raley4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
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Abstract
In settings where speakers of two or more different languages coexist, language brokering, the act of interpreting and translating between culturally and linguistically different speakers, is commonly practiced. Yet the examination of language brokering and its implications in classroom settings have not received much attention in the literature. The purpose of this study is to better understand how language brokering functions as an organizational tool in dual immersion classroom interactions to position second language (L2) students in ways that support or constrain learning opportunities. Our data suggest that although language-brokering events enable L2 learners to gain access to critical information in learning contexts, they also work to position the language broker as being more “able” in relation to the student receiving the brokering services, whose opportunities to publicly construct an “able” student identity are restricted. However, in dual immersion programs, the continual shifting of linguis...
  • References (25)
  • Citations (29)
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References25
Newest
Published on Nov 30, 2009in Bilingual Research Journal
Anne Marie Coyoca1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UC: University of California),
Jin Sook Lee1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UC: University of California)
This paper examines language-brokering events to better understand how children utilize their linguistic resources to create spaces where the coexistence of two languages can enable or restrict understanding and learning of academic content for themselves and others. An analysis of the structure of language-brokering events reveals that different directional processes and points of initiation are involved, and that these structures lead to different consequences for learning. The data illustrate...
Published on Mar 1, 2009in Review of Research in Education2.49
Jin Sook Lee2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara),
Katherine Anderson9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NIE: National Institute of Education)
Published on Nov 26, 2007
Mary Bucholtz28
Estimated H-index: 28
,
Kira Hall14
Estimated H-index: 14
Published on May 1, 2007in American Journal of Education1.32
Lisa M. Dorner9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Marjorie Faulstich Orellana18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Christine P. Li‐Grining1
Estimated H-index: 1
This study illustrates the regularity with which the children of mostly Mexican immigrants in Chicago interpret languages and cultural practices for their families. It also tests the hypothesis, generated from qualitative research, that such “language brokering” is related to academic outcomes. Using data collected from a subset of children ( \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage...
Published on Jan 1, 2007
Jean Lave27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
Debra Skinner1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsLiisa H. Malkki1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jan 1, 2007
Kim Potowski13
Estimated H-index: 13
Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: Immersion classroom research and methodology of this study Chapter 3: Inter-American Magnet School Chapter 4: Fifth grade language use and proficiency Chapter 5: Identity investments of fifth graders Chapter 6: Language use in eighth grade Chapter 7: Spanish proficiency in eighth grade Chapter 8: Identity investments in eighth grade Chapter 9: Conclusions
Published on Dec 5, 2005
Stanton Wortham24
Estimated H-index: 24
1. Self/knowledge 2. Social identification and local metapragmatic models 3. Academic learning and local cognitive models 4. Tyisha becoming an outcast 5. Maurice in the middle 6. Denaturalizing identity, learning and schooling Appendices References.
Published on Nov 1, 2005in Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences0.73
Alejandro Morales5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln),
William E. Hanson9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Purdue University)
This article reviews the literature in the area of language brokering. Language brokers are children of immigrant families who translate and interpret for their parents and other individuals. Results suggest that language brokers possess unique characteristics that make them suitable for their role as the family’s translator and interpreter. Parents select the child language broker based on certain personal qualities. Language brokers translate and interpret a variety of documents in a variety o...
Published on Aug 1, 2005in Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences0.73
Robert S. Weisskirch24
Estimated H-index: 24
(California State University, Monterey Bay)
Children of immigrant parents often translate written and face-to-face communication for parents and other adults, also known as language brokering. Fifty-five sixth-grade, Latino adolescents report their experiences and feelings toward language brokering, their level of acculturation, and their ethnic identity in a questionnaire. Generally, the participants view language brokering positively. Those who are less acculturated are translating more frequently than those who are more acculturated. F...
Cited By29
Newest
Published on Jan 16, 2019in Language Policy1.00
Kamilla Kraft2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen)
Taking the Norwegian construction industry as its site of study, this article discusses under which conditions migrant workers in the Norwegian construction industry obtain the status as new speakers in the workplace. These conditions are determined by language proficiency requirements and speaker hierarchies that are constructed through language management at various institutional levels (legislation, industry and workplace). Moreover, the article highlights how language management in the const...
Published on Aug 23, 2018in Education Sciences
Inclusion is a fundamental aspect of social studies education in general and democratic education in particular. Inclusion is especially important when we consider the possibilities for transnational civic culture and education. The theoretical framework of this study is based upon concepts of positionality, identity, and belonging as they are related to student understanding of communities. A dual-language, third-grade classroom provided the site for this ethnographic study. Data included parti...
Published on Aug 6, 2018in Journal of Latinos and Education
María Capdevila Gutiérrez (UCLM: University of Castilla–La Mancha), Fernando Rodríguez-Valls1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCLM: University of Castilla–La Mancha)
ABSTRACTLa poesia es un genero literario usado en los primeros anos de la vida y educacion cotidianamente. A medida que el nino crece, deja gradualmente de utilizarse hasta casi desparecer del curriculo en secundaria. Utilizar la poesia en el aula de programas de doble inmersion es un recurso favorecedor del desarrollo linguistico (en la L1 o L2) y de las habilidades criticas y analiticas. Trabajar con la poesia ayuda a maestros y estudiantes a indagar en cuestiones de identidad linguistica y cu...
Published on Jul 3, 2018in Bilingual Research Journal
Alexandra Babino2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Texas A&M University–Commerce),
Mary Amanda Stewart6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Texas Woman's University)
ABSTRACTDual language (DL) programs experience many tensions stemming from English hegemony in its curriculum, instruction, and assessment. These tensions often work in concert to usurp the three goals of DL programs to develop bilingualism, biliteracy, and bicultural competence while achieving grade level standards for its students. Subsequently, there is need to understand how DL teachers can and do enact agency as language policymakers to create DL programs that truly accomplishes its three-f...
Published on Jul 3, 2018in Bilingual Research Journal
Genevieve Leung4
Estimated H-index: 4
(USF: University of San Francisco),
Yuuko Uchikoshi10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Rosina Tong1
Estimated H-index: 1
ABSTRACTThough Cantonese has been spoken in the United States since the 1880s, very little is known about the attitudes of younger Cantonese speakers and learners and their ideas about their bi/multilingual identities. We fill this gap by reporting findings from focus group interviews with 14 fourth and fifth graders attending a Cantonese-English DLI school. We asked participants to discuss their beliefs about bi/multilingualism, their experiences with the DLI program, and their future aspiratio...
Published on Apr 3, 2018in Bilingual Research Journal
Anissa Wicktor Lynch (SUNY: State University of New York System)
ABSTRACTThis case study focused on transitional bilingual class and explored connections between the literacy practices co-constructed in this figured world and one student’s developing identity. Yanet, a newcomer student from Cuba, was encouraged to draw on community cultural wealth to support her own and her classmates’ language, literacy and identity development. Over time she figured an identity as an expert helping her to develop self-efficacy and a positive academic identity. Yanet’s teach...
Published on Apr 3, 2018in Bilingual Research Journal
Jennifer Collett (CUNY: City University of New York)
ABSTRACTEmergent bilinguals’ engagement and participation with learning is closely connected to the identities they are able to construct in this learning. In this paper, I present a model for understanding how young emergent bilinguals begin to construct identities with language and learning across school-based activities. Drawing upon Holland, Lachiotte, Skinner & Cain’s (1998) framework of how identities are shaped across figured worlds, and Nasir & Hand’s (2006, 2008) notion of practice-link...