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A hierarchical model of plumage: Morphology, development, and evolution

Published on Aug 15, 2003in Journal of Experimental Zoology 2.43
· DOI :10.1002/jez.b.27
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Kansas),
Jan Dyck7
Estimated H-index: 7
Abstract
Plumage is a complex component of the avian phenotype. The plumage of an individual is composed of numerous hierarchically arranged developmental and morphological modules. We present a hierarchical model of plumage that provides an intellectual framework for understanding the development and evolution of feathers. Independence, covariation, and interaction among plumage modules create numerous opportunities for developmental and evolutionary diversification of feather complexity and function. The hierarchical relationships among plumage modules are characterized by both top-down and bottom-up effects in which properties of modules at one level of the hierarchy determine or influence the properties of modules at lower or higher levels of the hierarchy. Plumage metamodules are created by covariation or interaction among modules at different levels of the hierarchy. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 298B: 73–90, 2003. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • References (50)
  • Citations (44)
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References50
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2002in Nature 41.58
Mingke Yu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Southern California),
Ping Wu23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Southern California)
+ 1 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
(University of Southern California)
regenerating flight feather follicles of chickens. We show that the antagonistic balance between noggin and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has a critical role in feather branching, with BMP4 promoting rachis formation and barb fusion, and noggin enhancing rachis and barb branching. Furthermore, we show that sonic hedgehog (Shh) is essential for inducing apoptosis of the marginal plate epithelia, which results in spaces between barbs. Our analyses identify the molecular pathways underlying t...
157 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2002in The Quarterly Review of Biology 2.32
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Kansas),
Alan H. Brush18
Estimated H-index: 18
ABSTRACT Progress on the evolutionary origin and diversification of feathers has been hampered by conceptual problems and by the lack of plesiomorphic feather fossils. Recently, both of these limitations have been overcome by the proposal of the developmental theory of the origin of feathers, and the discovery of primitive feather fossils on nonavian theropod dinosaurs. The conceptual problems of previous theories of the origin of feathers are reviewed, and the alternative developmental theory i...
194 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 15, 2002in Journal of Experimental Zoology 2.43
Matthew P. Harris25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Wisconsin-Madison),
John F. Fallon42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Kansas)
To examine the role of development in the origin of evolutionary novelties, we investigated the developmental mechanisms involved in the formation of a complex morphological novelty—branched feathers. We demonstrate that the anterior-posterior expression polarity of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) in the primordia of feathers, avian scales, and alligator scales is conserved and phylogenetically primitive to archosaurian integumentary appendages. In feather developmen...
104 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 22, 2002
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Kansas),
Scott Williamson24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Kansas)
Feathers are complex, branched keratin structures that exhibit a diversity of pigmentation patterns. Feather pigments are transferred into developing feather keratinocytes from pigment cells that migrate into the tubular feather germ from the dermis. Within–feather pigment patterns are determined by differential pigmentation of keratinocytes within independent barb ridges during feather development. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that determine which keratinocytes receive pigment...
55 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2002in Journal of Morphology 1.71
Lorenzo Alibardi27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Bologna)
Little is known of the lipid content of β-keratin-producing cells such as those of feathers, scutate scales, and beak. The sequence of epidermal layers in some apteria and in interfollicular epidermis in the zebrafinch embryo (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis) was studied. Also, the production of β-keratin in natal down feathers and beak was ultrastructurally analyzed in embryos from 3–4 to 17–18 days postdeposition, before hatching. Two layers of periderm initially cover the embryo, but there are...
49 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2001in Integrative and Comparative Biology 2.75
Kevin Padian27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of California, Berkeley)
SYNOPSIS. Adaptive scenarios in evolutionary biology have always been based on incremental improvements through a series of adaptive stages. But they have often been justified by appeal to assumptions of how natural selection must work or by appeal to optimality arguments or notions of evolutionary process. Cladistic methodology, though it cannot logically falsify hypotheses of process, provides hypotheses of evolutionary pattern independent of other considerations and so provides a useful test ...
35 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 15, 2001in Journal of Experimental Zoology 2.43
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(University of Kansas),
Scott Williamson24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Kansas)
We present the first explicit theory of the growth of feather shape, defined as the outline of a pennaceous feather vane. Based on a reanalysis of data from the literature, we pro- pose that the absolute growth rate of the barbs and rachis ridges, not the vertical growth rate, is uniform throughout the follicle. The growth of feathers is simulated with a mathematical model based on six growth parameters: (1) absolute barb and rachis ridge growth rate, (2) angle of heli- cal growth of barb ridges...
69 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2001in Nature 41.58
Qiang Ji3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Mark A. Norell57
Estimated H-index: 57
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 2 AuthorsDong Ren25
Estimated H-index: 25
Non-avian theropod dinosaurs with preserved integumentary coverings are becoming more common1,2,3,4,5,6; but apart from the multiple specimens of Caudipteryx, which have true feathers2,7, animals that are reasonably complete and entirely articulated that show these structures in relation to the body have not been reported. Here we report on an enigmatic small theropod dinosaur that is covered with filamentous feather-like structures over its entire body.
114 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2001in Nature 41.58
Hans-Dieter Sues35
Estimated H-index: 35
The evolution of feathers and flight were generally thought to be inextricably linked. But new fossils from China show that feathers pre-dated the origin of flight and of birds.
19 Citations Source Cite
Cited By44
Newest
Published on Apr 29, 2019in Protoplasma 2.46
Julia Lachner3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Florian Ehrlich1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 4 AuthorsLeopold Eckhart29
Estimated H-index: 29
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in The Journal of Experimental Biology 3.18
Chi-Chih Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Uppsala University),
Axel Klaesson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Uppsala University)
+ 4 AuthorsJochen B. W. Wolf32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
ABSTRACT Functional validation of candidate genes involved in adaptation and speciation remains challenging. Here, we exemplify the utility of a method quantifying individual mRNA transcripts in revealing the molecular basis of divergence in feather pigment synthesis during early-stage speciation in crows. Using a padlock probe assay combined with rolling circle amplification, we quantified cell-type-specific gene expression in the histological context of growing feather follicles. Expression of...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 20, 2019in Systematic Biology 8.52
Chad M. Eliason9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Field Museum of Natural History),
Michael J. Andersen12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of New Mexico),
Shannon J. Hackett26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Field Museum of Natural History)
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Published on Jun 5, 2018in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 3.14
Maria Eugenia Leone Gold4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Stony Brook University),
Mark A. Norell57
Estimated H-index: 57
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniela Schulz19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Yeditepe University)
Brain-behavior studies using 18F-FDG PET aim to reveal brain regions that become active during behavior. In standard protocols, 18F-FDG is injected, the behavior is executed during 30-60 min of tracer uptake, and then the animal is anesthetized and scanned. Hence, the uptake of 18F-FDG is not itself observed and could, in fact, be complete in very little time. This has implications for behavioral studies because uptake is assumed to reflect concurrent behavior. Here, we utilized a new, miniature...
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Published on Dec 1, 2017in BMC Genomics 3.73
Chih-Kuan Chen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National Taiwan University),
Chun-Ping Yu6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Academia Sinica)
+ 7 AuthorsWen-Hsiung Li94
Estimated H-index: 94
(University of Chicago)
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important in various biological processes, but very few studies on lncRNA have been conducted in birds. To identify IncRNAs expressed during feather development, we analyzed single-stranded RNA-seq (ssRNA-seq) data from the anterior and posterior dorsal regions during zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) embryonic development. Using published transcriptomic data, we further analyzed the evolutionary conservation of IncRNAs in birds and amniotes. A total of 1,081 l...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Royal Society Open Science 2.50
Yann Bourgeois9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Paul Sabatier University),
Boris Delahaie7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Paul Sabatier University)
+ 11 AuthorsClaire Mould1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Paul Sabatier University)
Understanding the mechanisms responsible for phenotypic diversification within and among species ultimately rests with linking naturally occurring mutations to functionally and ecologically significant traits. Colour polymorphisms are of great interest in this context because discrete colour patterns within a population are often controlled by just a few genes in a common environment. We investigated how and why phenotypic diversity arose and persists in the Zosterops borbonicus white-eye of Reu...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in BMC Evolutionary Biology 3.03
Thanh-Lan Gluckman3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Cambridge),
Nicholas I. Mundy31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Cambridge)
Avian plumage is ideal for investigating phenotypic convergence because of repeated evolution of the same within-feather patterns. In birds, there are three major types of regular patterns within feathers: scales, bars and spots. Existing models of within-feather pattern development suggest that scales have the simplest developmental mechanism, bars require more stringent regulation than scales, and spots have the strictest developmental parameters. We hypothesized that increasing stringency in ...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Evolution 3.82
Chad M. Eliason9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Texas at Austin),
Matthew D. Shawkey30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Ghent University),
Julia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Texas at Austin)
Melanin pigments contained in organelles (melanosomes) impart earthy colors to feathers. Such melanin-based colors are distributed across birds and thought to be the ancestral color-producing mechanism in birds. However, we have had limited data on melanin-based color and melanosome diversity in Palaeognathae, which includes the flighted tinamous and large-bodied, flightless ratites and is the sister taxon to all other extant birds. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and spectrophotometry...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 16, 2015in Annual Review of Animal Biosciences 6.78
Chih-Feng Chen15
Estimated H-index: 15
(National Chung Hsing University),
John Foley19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 5 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
(University of Southern California)
The feather is a complex ectodermal organ with hierarchical branching patterns. It provides functions in endothermy, communication, and flight. Studies of feather growth, cycling, and health are of fundamental importance to avian biology and poultry science. In addition, feathers are an excellent model for morphogenesis studies because of their accessibility, and their distinct patterns can be used to assay the roles of specific molecular pathways. Here we review the progress in aspects of devel...
40 Citations Source Cite