Richard O. Prum
Yale University
144Publications
44H-index
6,451Citations
Publications 144
Newest
Published on Feb 28, 2019in Journal of Evolutionary Biology 2.54
Samuel S. Snow1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Yale University),
Suzanne H. Alonzo22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of California, Santa Cruz)
+ 1 AuthorsRichard O. Prum44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Yale University)
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Published on Feb 1, 2018in Genome Biology and Evolution 3.94
Cong Liang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Yale University),
Jacob M. Musser5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Yale University)
+ 2 AuthorsGünter P. Wagner59
Estimated H-index: 59
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 12.35
Dakota E. McCoy1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Harvard University),
Teresa J. Feo6
Estimated H-index: 6
(National Museum of Natural History)
+ 1 AuthorsRichard O. Prum44
Estimated H-index: 44
(American Museum of Natural History)
Many studies have shown how pigments and internal nanostructures generate color in nature. External surface structures can also influence appearance, such as by causing multiple scattering of light (structural absorption) to produce a velvety, super black appearance. Here we show that feathers from five species of birds of paradise (Aves: Paradisaeidae) structurally absorb incident light to produce extremely low-reflectance, super black plumages. Directional reflectance of these feathers (0.05–0...
100 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2018in Evolution 3.82
Christopher J. Clark12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of California, Riverside),
Jimmy A. McGuire32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 2 AuthorsRichard O. Prum44
Estimated H-index: 44
(American Museum of Natural History)
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 25, 2018in bioRxiv
Jacob M. Musser5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Yale University),
Günter P. Wagner59
Estimated H-index: 59
(Yale University)
+ 4 AuthorsRichard O. Prum44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Yale University)
Birds and other reptiles possess a diversity of feather and scale-like skin appendages. Feathers are commonly assumed to have originated from ancestral scales in theropod dinosaurs. However, most birds also have scaled feet, indicating birds evolved the capacity to grow both ancestral and derived morphologies. This suggests a more complex evolutionary history than a simple linear transition between feathers and scales. We set out to investigate the evolution of feathers via the comparison of tra...
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Published on Aug 4, 2017in Science 41.06
Innes C. Cuthill55
Estimated H-index: 55
(University of Bristol),
William L. Allen8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Swansea University)
+ 24 AuthorsAlmut Kelber36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Lund University)
Coloration mediates the relationship between an organism and its environment in important ways, including social signaling, antipredator defenses, parasitic exploitation, thermoregulation, and protection from ultraviolet light, microbes, and abrasion. Methodological breakthroughs are accelerating knowledge of the processes underlying both the production of animal coloration and its perception, experiments are advancing understanding of mechanism and function, and measurements of color collected ...
57 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in The Auk 2.44
Patricia L. R. Brennan11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Massachusetts Amherst),
Ian Gereg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsRichard O. Prum44
Estimated H-index: 44
(American Museum of Natural History)
ABSTRACT Ducks are an excellent group to study avian genital evolution. Penis morphology of ducks is diverse, and penis length and elaboration are positively correlated with levels of male competition resulting from forced extra-pair copulations, and with female genital elaboration resulting from sexual conflict. Here we examined whether penis morphology is affected by social environment. We found experimental evidence that in a male-biased social environment, consisting of several males and few...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Science Advances
Andrej Singer15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of California, San Diego),
Leandra Boucheron4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of California, San Diego)
+ 7 AuthorsOleg Shpyrko22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of California, San Diego)
Many organisms in nature have evolved sophisticated cellular mechanisms to produce photonic nanostructures and, in recent years, diverse crystalline symmetries have been identified and related to macroscopic optical properties. However, because we know little about the distributions of domain sizes, the orientations of photonic crystals, and the nature of defects in these structures, we are unable to make the connection between the nanostructure and its development and functionality. We report o...
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in The American Naturalist 4.26
Richard O. Prum44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Yale University),
Larry Samuelson45
Estimated H-index: 45
AbstractInterspecific social dominance mimicry (ISDM) is a form of social parasitism in which a subordinate species evolves to mimic and deceive a dominant interference competitor in order to avoid attack by the dominant species. ISDM has been proposed to result in (1) antagonistic coevolutionary arms races in appearance between the model and the mimic (e.g., Ramphastos toucans) and (2) the evolution of complexes of multiple species converging on a common visual appearance (e.g., kiskadee flycat...
3 Citations Source Cite
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