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Sensor materials for the detection of human neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G activity in wound fluid
Published on Jun 1, 2011in Experimental Dermatology 2.61
· DOI :10.1111/j.1600-0625.2011.01256.x
Andrea Hasmann8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Graz University of Technology),
Ulrike Gewessler4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 8 AuthorsGeorg M. Guebitz41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Graz University of Technology)
Abstract
Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and cathepsin G (CatG) are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory disorders. These serine proteinases are released by neutrophils and monocytes in case of infection. Wound infection is a severe complication regarding wound healing causing diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In this study we have shown the potential of HNE and CatG to be used as markers for early detection of infection. Significant differences in HNE and CatG levels in infected and non-infected wound fluids were observed. Peptide substrates for these two enzymes were successfully immobilised on different surfaces, including collagen, modified collagen, polyamide polyesters and silica gel. HNE and CatG activities were monitored directly in wound fluid via hydrolysis of the chromogenic substrates. Infected wound fluids led to significant higher substrate hydrolysis compared with non-infected ones. These different approaches could be used for the development of devices which are able to detect elevated enzyme activities before manifestation of infection directly on bandages. This would allow a timely intervention by medical doctors thus preventing severe infections.
  • References (69)
  • Cited By (30)
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References69
Published on Jan 1, 1984in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 1.76
Lars Ekerot9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Kjell Ohlsson39
Estimated H-index: 39
Cumulative evidence indicates that articular destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might be mediated by proteolytic enzymes1,2,3. The hypothesis of enzymatic degradation is emphasized by the presence in the arthritic joint of a multitude of proteolytic enzymes with potential ability to attack the macromolecules of cartilage matrix. These enzymes can originate from nearly all cell types found in the inflamed joint as proliferating synovial lining cells,4 polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs)5, 6...
33 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 1988in Biochemical Journal 3.86
M A Selak3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Temple University),
M Chignard1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Temple University),
J B Smith10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Temple University)
The present studies were undertaken to characterize a serine protease released by N-formyl-L-Met-L-Leu-L-Phe (fMet-Leu-Phe)-stimulated neutrophils that rapidly induces platelet calcium mobilization, secretion and aggregation. The biological activity associated with this protease was unaffected by leupeptin, was only weakly diminished by N-p-tosyl-L-Lys-chloromethane, but was strongly inhibited by alpha 1-antitrypsin, soyabean trypsin inhibitor, N-tosyl-L-Phe-chloromethane and benzoyloxycarbonyl-...
131 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1988
Timothy J. Williams1
Estimated H-index: 1
The first phase of wound healing consists of an inflammatory response. It was the study of wounds that first led to the proposal that the visual manifestations of inflammation are caused by changes in blood vessels: dilatation underlying redness and plasma extravasation underlying tissue swelling (Hunter, 1794). Inflammation is important in wound healing because the associated micro-vascular changes result in the transfer of blood constituents from the vessels to the tissues. Thus, intradermal i...
7 Citations Source Cite
H. P. Hofer10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Graz),
Elisabeth M Kukovetz6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Graz)
+ 4 AuthorsR. J. Schaur15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Graz)
In the search for objective methods to monitor the course of wound healing, the proteinase PMN elastase (n=56 pat.), the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) (n=18 pat.), and polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN) migratory behaviour were measured [1, 6, 7, 11]. This “stimulated PMN-locomotion” was quantified by a new PMN migration filter assay (n=10 pat.) [2]. We determined the clinical course during “per primam (pp)” wound healing (group 1), “pp” wound healing with seconda...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1997in Laboratory Investigation 4.26
Sarah E. Herrick27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
Gillian S. Ashcroft38
Estimated H-index: 38
+ 3 AuthorsMark W. J. Ferguson57
Estimated H-index: 57
Chronic wound healing states are often associated with aging, and despite the increased number of aged patients with nonhealing wounds, controversy still exists concerning the effects of age on wound repair. Our previous work showed that in both venous ulcers in humans and acute wounds in aged animals, fibronectin, an early component in granulation tissue, is deficient compared to normal skin and acute wounds in healthy young animals, respectively. In the present study, we have determined the pr...
109 Citations
Published on Sep 25, 1980in Journal of Biological Chemistry 4.01
J A McDonald1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
D G Kelley1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract We have identified the biological activity of three polypeptides released by limited proteolysis of human plasma fibronectin by leukocyte elastase. A Mr = 140,000 peptide contains cell-spreading activity; a Mr = 60,000 peptide mediates binding to denatured collagen (gelatin), and a Mr = 29,000 peptide contains glutaminyl residues responsible for the transglutaminase (blood coagulation factor XIIIa)-catalyzed incorporation of amines. More extensive proteolysis yielded numerous peptides, ...
248 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 1986in Journal of Immunology 4.54
Stephen J. Weiss72
Estimated H-index: 72
(Life Sciences Institute),
John T. Curnutte52
Estimated H-index: 52
(University of Michigan),
S Regiani1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Michigan)
Both normal and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) neutrophils were able to degrade the subendothelial matrix secreted by human endothelial cells via an elastase-dependent process. In the absence of the plasma antiproteinase, alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha-1-PI), normal neutrophils protect their released elastase from inactivation by using the chlorinated oxidants hypochlorous acid and endogenous N-chloroamines to suppress the antiproteinase's activity. In contrast, CGD neutrophils were un...
101 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 1975in American Journal of Pathology 4.07
S. J. Leibovich1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
R. Ross1
Estimated H-index: 1
The role of the monocyte/macrophage in wound repair has been investigated by studying the healing process in wounds depleted of this cell and/or its phagocytic activity. Hydrocortisone acetate (0.6 mg/g body weight) administered as a subcutaneous depot was used to induce a prolonged monocytopenia in guinea pigs, and antimacrophage serum (AMS) was used for local elimination of tissue macrophages. In vitro, the presence of complement, macrophages are rapidly lysed and used killed by AMS. In the ab...
1,100 Citations
Published on Aug 10, 1982in Journal of Biological Chemistry 4.01
C F Reilly1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
D A Tewksbury1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsJames Travis67
Estimated H-index: 67
Abstract Human neutrophil cathepsin G and human skin mast cell chymase rapidly convert angiotensin I to angiotensin II with only minor cleavage elsewhere in the molecule. The rate of cleavage is consistent with a potential role for either or both of these enzymes in an alternate pathway for angiotensin II synthesis. Since neither enzyme in inhibited by captopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inactivator, it is possible that leukocyte and mast cell enzymes may play a significant role in the d...
227 Citations
Cited By30
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 3.34
Gregor Tegl5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna),
Doris Schiffer3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
+ 2 AuthorsGeorg M. Guebitz41
Estimated H-index: 41
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
Wound infection is a severe complication causing delayed healing and risks for patients. Conventional methods of diagnosis for infection involve error-prone clinical description of the wound and time-consuming microbiological tests. More reliable alternatives are still rare, except for invasive and unaffordable gold standard methods. This review discusses the diversity of new approaches for wound infection determination. There has been progress in the detection methods of microorganisms, includi...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 16, 2015in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 8.10
Mir-Morteza Sadat Ebrahimi3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Yvonne Voss1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Holger Schönherr37
Estimated H-index: 37
In this work, a self-reporting hydrogel for the rapid in situ detection of bacterial enzymes is reported. To implement the reporting function for the bacterium Escherichia coli into a film-based sensing format, chitosan hydrogel films on solid backing supports were equipped with a reporting function for the enzyme β-glucuronidase (β-GUS), which is secreted by >98% of all known E. coli strains. Covalent coupling of the fluorogenic substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide or the complementar...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2013in Wound Repair and Regeneration 2.95
Andrea Heinzle5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Nicole E. Papen‐Botterhuis1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 7 AuthorsEva Sigl5
Estimated H-index: 5
A gelatinase-based device for fast detection of wound infection was developed. Collective gelatinolytic activity in infected wounds was 23 times higher (p ≤ 0.001) than in noninfected wounds and blisters according to the clinical and microbiological description of the wounds. Enzyme activities of critical wounds showed 12-fold elevated enzyme activities compared with noninfected wounds and blisters. Upon incubation of gelatin-based devices with infected wound fluids, an incubation time of 30 min...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2015in European Polymer Journal 3.74
Mir-Morteza Sadat Ebrahimi3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Siegen),
Benedikt Steinhoff1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Siegen),
Holger Schönherr37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Siegen)
Abstract In this work the development of a responsive hydrogel coating for the remote sensing of bacterial enzymes is reported for the selective, sensitive and rapid in situ detection of (pathogenic) bacteria. The approach is based on the combination of a portable optical fiber setup with a self-reporting hydrogel applied as a coating on the glass fiber tip. To implement the enzyme sensing function, chitosan was functionalized with the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β- d -glucu...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 2, 2015in Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics 3.33
Doris Schiffer3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna),
Gregor Tegl5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
+ 5 AuthorsGeorg M. Guebitz41
Estimated H-index: 41
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
There is a pressing need for point-of-care diagnostics indicating early stages of infection. Polymers can respond to enzymes secreted by microorganisms or released by the human immune system. This provokes either a direct color reaction or release of dyes, allowing early-stage detection of wound infections and contamination of medical devices. Conventional methods for the detection of infection indicators are based on slow, laboratory-based procedures and, consequently, do not allow a timely ass...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2015in Wound Repair and Regeneration 2.95
Miriam H.E. Blokhuis-Arkes3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Medisch Spectrum Twente),
Marieke Haalboom1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Medisch Spectrum Twente)
+ 4 AuthorsRoland J. Beuk3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Medisch Spectrum Twente)
In clinical practice, diagnosis of wound infection is based on the classical clinical signs of infection. When infection is suspected, wounds are often swabbed for microbiological culturing. These methods are not accurate (clinical judgment in chronic wounds) or provide results after several days (wound swab). Therefore, there is an urgent need for an easy-to-use diagnostic tool for fast detection of wound infection, especially in chronic wounds. This study determined the diagnostic properties o...
6 Citations Source Cite
Markus W. Löffler8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Tübingen),
Heiko Schuster12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Tübingen)
+ 1 AuthorsStefan Beckert16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Tübingen)
Valid and reproducible sampling techniques as well as processing protocols are required for the assessment of biomarkers and mediators contained in wound exudate. Moreover, the ideal technique should be easy to use even in daily clinical routine. This is challenging since wound fluid represents an inhomogeneous mixture of different exogenous and endogenous sources. Analyzing wound fluid, however, may facilitate clinical decision making. Many techniques for obtaining wound fluid have been describ...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2013in Biosensors and Bioelectronics 8.17
Tim R. Dargaville20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Queensland University of Technology),
Brooke L. Farrugia12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Queensland University of Technology)
+ 3 AuthorsNicolas H. Voelcker43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of South Australia)
Abstract Wound healing involves a complex series of biochemical events and has traditionally been managed with ‘low tech’ dressings and bandages. The concept that diagnostic and theranostic sensors can complement wound management is rapidly growing in popularity as there is tremendous potential to apply this technology to both acute and chronic wounds. Benefits in sensing the wound environment include reduction of hospitalization time, prevention of amputations and better understanding of the pr...
147 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2014in Electrochemistry Communications 4.66
Anna McLister4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Ulster University),
Jolene Phair6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Ulster University)
+ 1 AuthorsJames Davis29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Ulster University)
Abstract At present, there is a clear requirement for the development of new sensors or the translation of existing systems for the point of care management of chronic wounds. The availability of such devices could significantly improve clinical outcome — particularly in the early identification of infection. This review identifies electrochemical research strategies that are being targeted at wound diagnostics and provides a critical overview of emerging research that could be pivotal in settin...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Acta Biomaterialia 6.38
Liane Moura9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Coimbra),
Ana M.A. Dias23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Coimbra)
+ 1 AuthorsHermínio C. de Sousa24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Coimbra)
Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a chronic, non-healing complication of diabetes that lead to high hospital costs and, in extreme cases, to amputation. Diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, abnormal cellular and cytokine/chemokine activity are among the main factors that hinder diabetic wound repair. DFUs represent a current and important challenge in the development of novel and efficient wound dressings. In general, an ideal wound dressing should provide a moist wound environment, o...
195 Citations Source Cite
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