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Hippocampal volume and functional connectivity changes during the female menstrual cycle.

Published on Sep 1, 2015in NeuroImage5.81
· DOI :10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.06.012
Nina Lisofsky6
Estimated H-index: 6
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Johan Mårtensson12
Estimated H-index: 12
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
+ 3 AuthorsSimone Kühn40
Estimated H-index: 40
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
Cite
Abstract
Hippocampal volume has been shown to be sensitive to variations in estrogen and progesterone levels across rodents' estrous cycle. However, little is known about the covariation of hormone levels and brain structure in the course of the human menstrual cycle. Here, we examine this covariation with a multi-method approach that includes several brain imaging methods and hormonal assessments. We acquired structural and functional scans from 21 naturally cycling women on four time points during their cycles (early follicular phase, late follicular phase, ovulation and luteal phase). Hormone blood concentrations and cognitive performance in different domains were assessed on each of the measurement occasions. Structural MRI images were processed by means of whole-brain voxel-based morphometry and FreeSurfer. With either method, bilateral increases in hippocampal volume were found in the late follicular phase relative to the early follicular phase. The gray matter probability in regions of hippocampal volume increase was associated with lower mean diffusivity in the same region. In addition, we observed higher functional connectivity between the hippocampi and the bilateral superior parietal lobe in the late follicular phase. We did not find any reliable cycle-related performance variations on the cognitive tasks. The present results show that hormonal fluctuations covary with hippocampal structure and function in the course of the human menstrual cycle.
  • References (70)
  • Citations (40)
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References70
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Human Brain Mapping4.55
Simone Kühn40
Estimated H-index: 40
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Jürgen Gallinat47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Charité)
The most important cognitive domains where hippocampal formation is crucially involved are navigation and memory. Some evidence suggests that different hippocampal subregions mediate these domains. However, a quantitative meta-analysis on neuroimaging studies of spatial navigation versus memory is lacking. By means of activation likelihood estimation (ALE), we investigate concurrence of brain regions activated during spatial navigation encoding and retrieval as well as during episodic memory enc...
Published on Feb 1, 2014
Martina Mihalj5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Ines Drenjančević3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 4 AuthorsRudika Gmajnić5
Estimated H-index: 5
Aim: To investigate the role of sex hormones in the modulation of specific cognitive functions across the menstrual cycle of young healthy women, and to apply improved study design by addressing limitations recognized in previous studies. Methods: A homogenous group of 16 young healthy women, with no history of health problems related to menstrual cycle, major psychiatric and neurological disorders or addictions was included in study. All participants were medical students of similar age (21.56±...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Translational Neuroscience2.04
Dema Hussain5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Concordia University),
Waqqas M. Shams5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Concordia University),
Wayne G. Brake24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Concordia University)
Studies in both rodents and humans have made much progress in shedding light on how fluctuations in ovarian hormones can affect memory in women across the lifespan. Specifically, advances in neuroscience have identified multiple memory systems that are each mediated by different brain areas. Two memory systems used to navigate an environment are ‘place’ and ‘response’ memory. They are defined as either using an allocentric strategy: using a spatial or cognitive map of the surroundings, or an ego...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in NeuroImage5.81
Lily R. Qiu4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Jürgen Germann3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 4 AuthorsJason P. Lerch5
Estimated H-index: 5
Abstract Recent human and rodent brain imaging studies have shown that the shape of the brain can be changed by experience. These mesoscopic alterations in neuroanatomy are hypothesized to be driven by changes at the level of neuronal processes. To examine whether the shape of the brain changes rapidly, we used MRI to examine changes in the volume of the hippocampus across the 4–6 day estrous cycle in the female mouse. It is well known that changing steroid levels across the cycle influence dend...
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Pain6.03
Cheng-Hao Tu7
Estimated H-index: 7
(NYMU: National Yang-Ming University),
David M. Niddam16
Estimated H-index: 16
(NYMU: National Yang-Ming University)
+ 5 AuthorsJen-Chuen Hsieh40
Estimated H-index: 40
(NYMU: National Yang-Ming University)
Abstract Dysmenorrhea is the most prevalent gynecological disorder in women of child-bearing age. Dysmenorrhea is associated with central sensitization and functional and structural changes in the brain. Our recent brain morphometry study disclosed that dysmenorrhea is associated with trait-related abnormal gray matter (GM) changes, even in the absence of menstrual pain, indicating that the adolescent brain is vulnerable to menstrual pain. Here we report rapid state-related brain morphological c...
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Brain Research2.93
T De Bondt1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Antwerp),
Yves Jacquemyn13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Antwerp)
+ 3 AuthorsPaul M. Parizel38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Antwerp)
Abstract During the menstrual cycle, hormone-driven functional and morphological changes occur in the female brain. The influence of hormonal contraceptives on these changes has received only little attention in the medical literature. The purpose of our study is to measure regional gray matter volume changes as a function of the cycle phase and use of hormonal contraceptives, in relation to blood concentrations of sex hormones. We performed a prospective study in 30 healthy young women; 15 wome...
Published on May 1, 2013in Human Brain Mapping4.55
Lindsey Ossewaarde11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Guido van Wingen34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
+ 3 AuthorsGuillén Fernández70
Estimated H-index: 70
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
Premenstrual increases in negative mood are thought to arise from changes in gonadal hormone levels, presumably by influencing mood regulation and stress sensitivity. The amygdala plays a major rol ...
Published on May 1, 2013in Human Brain Mapping4.55
H. Michael Zhang5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Arne D. Ekstrom36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
r r Abstract: Previous studies suggest the importance of medial temporal lobe, areas of parietal cortex, and retrosplenial cortex in human spatial navigation, though the exact role of these structures in repre- senting the relations of elements within a spatial layout (''allocentric'' representation) remains unre- solved. Hippocampal involvement, in particular, during memory processing is affected by whether a previously formed representation is employed in a novel fashion (''flexible'' usage) o...
Published on Nov 1, 2013in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews8.00
Martin Lövdén38
Estimated H-index: 38
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Elisabeth Wenger11
Estimated H-index: 11
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
+ 2 AuthorsLars Bäckman83
Estimated H-index: 83
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
Recent research using magnetic resonance imaging has documented changes in the adult human brain's grey matter structure induced by alterations in experiential demands. We review this research and relate it to models of brain plasticity from related strands of research, such as work on animal models. This allows us to generate recommendations and predictions for future research that may advance the understanding of the function, sequential progression, and microstructural nature of experience-de...
Published on Jun 1, 2012in Zeitschrift Fur Medizinische Physik2.32
Vyara Tonkova2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Volker Arhelger2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsHeiko Neeb2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract We present an algorithm for the fast mapping of myelin water content using standard multiecho gradient echo acquisitions of the human brain. The method extents a previously published approach for the simultaneous measurement of brain T 1 , T 2 * and total water content. Employing the multiexponential T 2 * decay signal of myelinated tissue, myelin water content was measured based on the quantification of two water pools (“myelin water” and “rest”) with different relaxation times. As the...
Cited By40
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Nature Communications11.88
Ivana Jaric1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Fordham University),
Devin Rocks (Fordham University)+ 2 AuthorsMarija Kundakovic21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Fordham University)
Male and female brains differ significantly in both health and disease, and yet the female brain has been understudied. Sex-hormone fluctuations make the female brain particularly dynamic and are likely to confer female-specific risks for neuropsychiatric disorders. The molecular mechanisms underlying the dynamic nature of the female brain structure and function are unknown. Here we show that neuronal chromatin organization in the female ventral hippocampus of mouse fluctuates with the oestrous ...
Published on Mar 18, 2019in Molecular Brain4.05
Paul A. S. Sheppard (UBC: University of British Columbia), Elena Choleris37
Estimated H-index: 37
(U of G: University of Guelph),
Liisa A.M. Galea59
Estimated H-index: 59
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
It is well established that estrogens affect neuroplasticity in a number of brain regions. In particular, estrogens modulate and mediate spine and synapse formation as well as neurogenesis in the hippocampal formation. In this review, we discuss current research exploring the effects of estrogens on dendritic spine plasticity and neurogenesis with a focus on the modulating factors of sex, age, and pregnancy. Hormone levels, including those of estrogens, fluctuate widely across the lifespan from ...
Published on 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Belinda Pletzer11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Salzburg),
TiAnni Harris2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Salzburg),
Esmeralda Hidalgo-Lopez2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Salzburg)
Oral contraceptive (OC) effects on the brain have gained increasing interest, but are highly controversial. Previous studies suggest that OC users have larger hippocampi, parahippocampi, fusiform gyri and Cerebelli. Preliminary evidence from one of those studies even suggests an effect of previous contraceptive use on the hippocampi of women who are not current users of OCs. Furthermore, more recent studies postulate an involvement of previous OC treatment in later development of mood disorders....
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Brain Research2.93
Kyoko Konishi (Harvard University), Sara Cherkerzian12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Brigham and Women's Hospital)
+ 6 AuthorsJill M. Goldstein64
Estimated H-index: 64
(Harvard University)
Abstract Dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS) is an adrenal androgen that is, in part, aromatized to estradiol. It continues to be produced after menopause and provides estrogenicity after depletion of ovarian hormones. Estradiol depletion contributes to memory circuitry changes over menopause, including changes in hippocampal (HIPP) and dorsolateral- and ventrolateral-prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; VLPFC) function. Further, major depressive disorder (MDD) patients have, in general, lower levels of...
Published on 2019in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews8.00
Kelly G. Lambert3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UR: University of Richmond),
Amelia J. Eisch55
Estimated H-index: 55
(UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
+ 2 AuthorsMichael Merzenich
Abstract Although neuroscience research has debunked the late 19th century claims suggesting that large portions of the brain are typically unused, recent evidence indicates that an enhanced understanding of neural plasticity may lead to greater insights related to the functional capacity of brains. Continuous and real-time neural modifications in concert with dynamic environmental contexts provide opportunities for targeted interventions for maintaining healthy brain functions throughout the li...
Published on May 1, 2019in NeuroImage5.81
Julian David Karch2
Estimated H-index: 2
(LEI: Leiden University),
Julian D. Karch (LEI: Leiden University)+ 7 AuthorsAndreas M. Brandmaier12
Estimated H-index: 12
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
Abstract Adequate reliability of measurement is a precondition for investigating individual differences and age-related changes in brain structure. One approach to improve reliability is to identify and control for variables that are predictive of within-person variance. To this end, we applied both classical statistical methods and machine-learning-inspired approaches to structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) data of six participants aged 24–31 years gathered at 40–50 occasions distribute...
Published on Jun 13, 2019in Neuropsychopharmacology7.16
Belinda Pletzer11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Salzburg),
TiAnni Harris2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Salzburg)
+ 1 AuthorsEsmeralda Hidalgo-Lopez2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Salzburg)
Estradiol and progesterone vary along the menstrual cycle and exert opposite effects on a variety of neurotransmitter systems. However, few studies have addressed menstrual cycle-dependent changes in the brain. In the present study we investigate menstrual cycle changes in brain activation and connectivity patterns underlying cognition. Thirty-six naturally cycling women underwent functional MRI during two cognitive tasks: spatial navigation and verbal fluency. While no significant performance d...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Molecular Neurobiology4.59
Ivana Grković5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Belgrade),
Nataša Mitrović5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Belgrade)
+ 3 AuthorsNadežda Nedeljković5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Belgrade)
Purinergic signaling is the main synaptic and non-synaptic signaling system in brain. ATP acts as a fast excitatory transmitter, while adenosine sets a global inhibitory tone within hippocampal neuronal networks. ATP and adenosine are interconnected by ectonucleotidase enzymes, which convert ATP to adenosine. Existing data point to the converging roles of ovarian steroids and purinergic signaling in synapse formation and refinement and synapse activity in the hippocampus. Therefore, in the prese...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Neurobiology of Aging4.40
Cynthia Anckaerts1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Antwerp),
Jaana van Gastel4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Antwerp)
+ 12 AuthorsP. E. J. Bols27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Antwerp)
Abstract A large proportion of the population suffers from endocrine disruption, e.g., menopausal women, which might result in accelerated aging and a higher risk for developing cognitive disorders. Therefore, it is crucial to fully understand the impact of such disruptions on the brain to identify potential therapeutic strategies. Here, we show using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging that ovariectomy and consequent hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal disruption result in the select...