Effects of drought on contrasting insect and plant species in the UK in the mid-1990s

Published on Feb 20, 2002in Global Ecology and Biogeography 5.96
· DOI :10.1046/j.1466-822X.2002.00174.x
Michael D. Morecroft33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Oxford),
C. E. Bealey1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Defence Evaluation and Research Agency)
+ 2 AuthorsI. P. Woiwod1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Hertfordshire)
Abstract
Abstract Aim We examined the effects of drought in the summer of 1995 and the subsequent year on contrasting species of plants, moths, butterflies and ground beetles. We tested whether population increases were associated with: (a) species of warm environments (b) species of dry environments (c) species with rapid reproduction (d) species with high rates of dispersal. Location The study was conducted at Environmental Change Network (ECN) sites throughout Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Methods Climate monitoring, recording of plant species in permanent plots, transect walking for butterflies, light trapping for moths and pitfall trapping for carabid beetles were used. Results There was an overall increase in the number of species recorded in permanent vegetation plots between 1994 and 1996, principally among the annual and biennial vascular plants, probably as a result of gap colonization in grasslands. Most butterfly and moth species increased between 1994 and 1995. Among the butterflies, a southern distribution and high mobility were associated with species tending to increase throughout the period 1994–96, whereas declining species tended to have a northern distribution. A similar number of carabid beetle species increased as decreased in the period 1994–96; decreasing species tended to be associated with lower temperatures and wetter soils. Conclusions Current climate change scenarios indicate that the incidence of droughts in the United Kingdom will increase. A series of dry, hot summers could lead to a rapid change in the population of some species although others, including many plants, may be more resilient. This may lead to complex changes in ecosystems and needs to be considered in planning conservation strategies.
  • References (37)
  • Citations (64)
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References37
Published on May 1, 1999in Nature 41.58
Chris D. Thomas81
Estimated H-index: 81
,
Jack J. Lennon28
Estimated H-index: 28
627 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 12, 1989in Journal of Applied Entomology 1.63
M. D. Eyre1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
M. L. Luff1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsChris Topping23
Estimated H-index: 23
Abstract The ground beetle and weevil communities on thirty grassland sites differing in intensity of management were sampled using pitfall traps in north-east England. The beetle communities were analysed using classification (TWINSPAN) and ordination (DECORANA) and, together with measured environmental variables, canonical correlation analysis (CANOCO). Classification and ordination of the ground beetle data indicated that management was the most important factor affecting the communities; the...
48 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 1997in Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 3.12
Christopher D. Preston30
Estimated H-index: 30
,
M. O. Hill21
Estimated H-index: 21
Abstract Classifications of British and Irish vascular plants into floristic elements are reviewed. Only H.C. Watson and J.R. Matthews have attempted to devise a more or less comprehensive classification, based on the British range of the species (Watson) or the European distribution (Matthews). A new classification of 1481 native species is presented, based on their range in the Northern Hemisphere. Species are classified by their occurrence in one or more major biomes (Arctic, Boreal, Temperat...
159 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1998in Biological Conservation 4.66
Felix Kienast35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
Otto Wildi14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Bogdan Brzeziecki11
Estimated H-index: 11
In this ecological risk assessment we evaluated potential climate-induced vegetation changes in mountain forests of Central Europe and possible impacts on species richness. The analysis was performed on all lkm grid points of the Swiss forest inventory (c. 11500 points) as well as on two subsets representing the forested points within the geographical limits of two inventories of legally protected reserve areas. The core of the approach is (a) a conceptual model of the movement of climatic range...
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Published on Jan 19, 2006in Soil Use and Management 1.34
Michael D. Morecroft33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Oxford),
T. P. Burt57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Durham University)
+ 1 AuthorsA.P. Rowland1
Estimated H-index: 1
. The effect of drought between summer 1995 and 1997 on stream and river nitrate concentrations was investigated using sites close to the long-running meteorological station in Oxford, UK. Nitrate concentrations in the River Windrush were relatively low during the drought, but after it had ended reached the highest level since records began in 1973. The low concentrations during the drought probably reflect a reduced contribution from agricultural runoff. High nitrate concentrations were found i...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 1992in Surveys in Geophysics 3.76
André Berger48
Estimated H-index: 48
(Université catholique de Louvain),
C. Tricot8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Université catholique de Louvain)
The greenhouse effect on the Earth is identified by the difference between the effective radiating temperature of the planet and its surface temperature. The difference between the energy emitted by the surface and that emitted upward to space by the upper atmosphere quantifies it; it can therefore be defined as the long wave energy trapped in the atmosphere. Climate forcing and the response of the climate system within which climate feedback mechanisms are contained, will be defined in this rev...
233 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 1991in Ecological Entomology 2.24
S. P. Rushton1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
M. L. Luff1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
M. D. Eyre1
Estimated H-index: 1
. 1 Pterostichus species were sampled on ninety-two sites distributed throughout north-east England using pitfall trapping. 2 The incidence of each species was related to measured site environmental variables using logistic regression. 3 Four species groups were identified on the basis of size. The extent of overlap in habitat types between species in each group varied. Two large species overlapped considerably whilst the smaller species showed different responses to one or more environmental va...
86 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 1995in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
Roy Sanderson27
Estimated H-index: 27
,
S. P. Rushton42
Estimated H-index: 42
+ 1 AuthorsJ. P. Byrne1
Estimated H-index: 1
1. The role of spatial factors in determining the structure and function of plant and invertebrate communities on a 117 ha upland moor in north-east England was investigated using ordination and Mantel tests. 2. The vegetation species composition was spatially autocorrelated and associated with the soil conditions. The species composition of Auchenorrhyncha (Hemiptera) communities appeared to be determined by both the soil conditions and vegetation species composition, whereas Heteroptera (Hemip...
95 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 1994in Nature 41.58
Georg Grabherr28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Vienna),
Michael Gottfried16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Vienna),
Harald Pauli19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Vienna)
768 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 1989in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
S. P. Rushton42
Estimated H-index: 42
,
M. L. Luff11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
M. D. Eyre10
Estimated H-index: 10
(1) The effects of pasture improvement procedures and subsequent pesticide use on the ground beetle and spider faunas of semi-natural upland grasslands in Northumberland in 1985-87 were analysed using pitfall trapping and multivariate techniques. (2) The sites were classified and ordinated on the basis of their species lists of spiders and ground beetles. Stepwise linear discriminant analyses were used to identify the major environmental features influencing the distribution of species across si...
88 Citations Source Cite
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  • Citations (64)
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Cited By64
Published on May 1, 2014in Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change 5.12
Tom H. Oliver26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Michael D. Morecroft33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Natural England)
Global change drivers are known to interact in their effects on biodiversity, but much research to date ignores this complexity. As a consequence, there are problems in the attribution of biodiversity change to different drivers and, therefore, our ability to manage habitats and landscapes appropriately. Few studies explicitly acknowledge and account for interactive (i.e. non-additive) effects of land use and climate change on biodiversity. One reason is that the mechanisms by which drivers inte...
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Published on Mar 1, 2011in Journal of Zoology 1.96
Melanie Gibbs13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Christer Wiklund52
Estimated H-index: 52
(Stockholm University),
H Van Dyck4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Université catholique de Louvain)
In seasonal environments, phenotypic plasticity in response to gradual changes in environmental variables may result in the production of discrete seasonal morphs. Production of the appropriate seasonal morph at the correct time relies on individuals interpreting environmental cues during their development. The speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria (L.) has previously been shown to have developmental and phenotypic plasticity across seasons and space (habitats). Here, we examine the developmen...
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Published on Apr 1, 2004in Journal of Biogeography 4.15
Konrad Martin9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Hohenheim),
Michael Sommer2
Estimated H-index: 2
Aim The objectives were to (1) analyse the combined effects of soil pH, Ca content and soil moisture on total density and species richness of land snails in forest ecosystems, (2) explore relationships between the quantitative composition of snail assemblages and habitat characteristics, (3) investigate the relationships between soil pH and density of some of the most frequent species, and (4) compare the data with those from studies conducted in other temperate-humid regions of Europe. Location...
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Published on Jan 1, 2012in Evolutionary Applications 4.69
Melanie Gibbs13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Hans Van Dyck32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Casper J. Breuker16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Oxford Brookes University)
With global climate change, rainfall is becoming more variable. Predicting the responses of species to changing rainfall levels is difficult because, for example in herbivorous species, these effects may be mediated indirectly through changes in host plant quality. Furthermore, species responses may result from a simultaneous interaction between rainfall levels and other environmental variables such as anthropogenic land use or habitat quality. In this eco-evolutionary study, we examined how mal...
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Published on Sep 1, 2006in Annals of Forest Science 2.36
Gaëlle Rouault5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Institut national de la recherche agronomique),
Jean-Noël Candau6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 3 AuthorsNathalie Warzée2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Université libre de Bruxelles)
Bien que la secheresse affecte directement la physiologie et la croissance des arbres, l'impact de facteurs secondaires (insectes ravageurs, pathogenes et feu) est souvent plus important que le stress original et peut conduire a la mortalite des arbres. En 2003, une secheresse et des vagues de chaleur ont provoque des degâts importants dans les forets d'Europe centrale et occidentale. Cet article rend compte de l'impact de la secheresse et de la canicule sur les populations d'insectes forestiers...
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Published on Jun 1, 2006in Austral Ecology 1.73
Peter S. Grimbacher13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Cooperative Research Centre),
Carla Catterall36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Cooperative Research Centre),
Roger Kitching36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Cooperative Research Centre)
Despite the enormous contribution of invertebrates to global biodiversity and ecosystem function, the patterns and causes of insect responses to tropical rainforest destruction and fragmentation remain poorly understood. We studied the responses of beetles to these factors in a fragmented upland rainforest landscape in north-east Queensland, Australia. Beetles were sampled using flight interception traps from six replicate sites in rainforest interior, rainforest edge, small rainforest remnants ...
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Published on Oct 1, 2012in Entomologia Experimentalis Et Applicata 1.45
Natalie Robinson4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Colorado Boulder),
Stephen Armstead1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Colorado Boulder),
M. Deane Bowers39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Colorado Boulder)
We compared variation in butterfly communities across 3 years at six different habitats in a temperate ecosystem near Boulder, Colorado, USA. These habitats were classified by the local Open Space consortium as Grasslands, Tallgrass, Foothills Grasslands, Foothills Riparian, Plains Riparian, and Montane Woodland. Rainfall and temperature varied considerably during these years. We surveyed butterflies using the Pollard-Yates method of invertebrate sampling and compared abundance, species richness...
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Published on Jan 1, 2011in Acta Societatis Botanicorum Poloniae 0.88
Zbigniew Dzwonko15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Stefania Loster11
Estimated H-index: 11
We examined to what extend the rate and direction of changes in unmanaged grassland depend on fluctuations in climatic conditions. Vegetation data from permanent plots in a semi-natural grassland in southern Poland collected over 12 years were used. Relations between weather variables, time, and the cover of 41 more frequent species and 14 plant functional groups were analysed. The greatest effect on the dynamics of species and functional groups had precipitation in spring and/or early summer, p...
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Published on Apr 1, 2015in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Esther Klop2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Wageningen University and Research Centre),
Bram Omon1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wageningen University and Research Centre),
Michiel F. WallisDeVries24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Butterfly Conservation)
Nitrogen deposition is considered as one of the main threats to biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Three mechanisms have been proposed to explain the detrimental effect of excess nitrogen on butterflies: loss of host plants, deterioration of food plant quality and microclimatic cooling in spring. Here, we investigated whether these mechanisms might explain the dramatic recent decline of the Wall Brown butterfly Lasiommata megera. Monitoring data from the Netherlands indeed show a greater de...
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Published on May 26, 2005in Biodiversity Informatics
Enrique Martínez-Meyer28
Estimated H-index: 28
(National Autonomous University of Mexico)
Global climate change and its broad spectrum of effects on human and natural systems has become a central research topic in recent years; biodiversity informatics tools?particularly ecological niche modeling (ENM)?have been used extensively to anticipate potential effects on geographic distributions of species. Misuse of these tools, however, is counterproductive, as biased conclusions might be reached. In this paper, I discuss some issues related to niche theory, geographic distributions, data ...
89 Citations Source Cite