The single, ancient origin of chromist plastids

Published on Nov 26, 2002in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 9.50
· DOI :10.1073/pnas.242379899
Hwan Su Yoon24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Iowa),
Jeremiah D. Hackett24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Iowa)
+ 1 AuthorsDebashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
(University of Iowa)
Abstract
Abstract Algae include a diverse array of photosynthetic eukaryotes excluding land plants. Explaining the origin of algal plastids continues to be a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Current knowledge suggests that plastid primary endosymbiosis, in which a single-celled protist engulfs and “enslaves” a cyanobacterium, likely occurred once and resulted in the primordial alga. This eukaryote then gave rise through vertical evolution to the red, green, and glaucophyte algae. However, some modern algal lineages have a more complicated evolutionary history involving a secondary endosymbiotic event, in which a protist engulfed an existing eukaryotic alga (rather than a cyanobacterium), which was then reduced to a secondary plastid. Secondary endosymbiosis explains the majority of algal biodiversity, yet the number and timing of these events is unresolved. Here we analyzed a five-gene plastid data set to show that a taxonomically diverse group of chlorophyll c2-containing protists comprising cryptophyte, haptophyte, and stramenopiles algae (Chromista) share a common plastid that most likely arose from a single, ancient (≈1,260 million years ago) secondary endosymbiosis involving a red alga. This finding is consistent with Chromista monophyly and implicates secondary endosymbiosis as an important force in generating eukaryotic biodiversity.
  • References (2)
  • Citations (281)
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References2
Published on Jan 1, 1997
Debashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
D. Bhattacharya, An introduction to algal phylogeny and phylogenetic methods * S. Turner, Molecular systematics of oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria * C.F. Delwiche, J.D. Palmer, The origin of plastids and their spread via secondary symbiosis * T. Friedl, The evolution of the Green Algae * V.A.R. Huss, H.D. Kranz, Charophyte evolution and the origin of land plants * G.W. Saunders, G.T. Kraft, A molecular perspective on red algal evolution: focus on the Florideophycidae * D. Bhattacharya, H.A. Sch...
76 Citations Source Cite
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Cited By281
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Methods of Molecular Biology
Jinling Huang20
Estimated H-index: 20
(East Carolina University),
J. Peter Gogarten42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Connecticut)
20 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 31, 2006in Algae 1.56
Reyes-Prieto Adrian1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Hwan-Su Yoon1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Debashish Bhattacharya64
Estimated H-index: 64
Genomic data is accumulating in public database at an unprecedented rate. Although presently dominated by the sequences of metazoan, plant, parasitic, and picoeukaryotic taxa, both expressed sequence tag (EST) and complete genomes of free-living algae are also slowly appearing. This wealth of information offers the opportunity to clarify many long-standing issues in algal and plant evolution such as the contribution of the plastid endosymbiont to nuclear genome evolution using the tools of compa...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 16, 2011in Nature Precedings
Wriddhiman Ghosh10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Prabir Kumar Haldar1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsMasrure Alam5
Estimated H-index: 5
Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Advances in Botanical Research 1.39
Thomas Mock29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of East Anglia),
Linda Medlin11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Abstract Diatoms are unicellular eukaryotes with nano-patterned silica cell walls and they contribute about 20% of global primary production. Their beautiful shells and significance for life on our planet already caused scientific interest many centuries ago. However, the development of genetics and genomics-enabled technology about two decades ago and their application to diatom research has caused a step change in our understanding of diatom evolution, biology and ecology. In contrast to plant...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2003in Journal of Applied Phycology 2.40
Thierry Tonon29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of York),
David Harvey9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of York)
+ 1 AuthorsIan A. Graham54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of York)
Two novel cDNAs, Plubc1 and Plubc2, encoding ubiquitin-conjugatingenzyme E2, were isolated from a Pavlova lutheri cDNA library. They areeach encoded by single copy genes in thealgae genome. Sequence comparison withplant, yeast and algal E2 sequences showedthat PlUBC1 and PlUBC2 are members of newE2 subfamilies. Time-course expressionanalysis of the two cDNAs revealed thatPlubc1 is transitionallyover-expressed at the end of theexponential phase of growth of the culture,while Plubc2 is constitutiv...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 5, 2015in PLOS ONE 2.77
Jong Im Kim10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Chungnam National University),
Hwan Su Yoon14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Sungkyunkwan University)
+ 3 AuthorsWoongghi Shin14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Chungnam National University)
Teleaulax amphioxeia is a photosynthetic unicellular cryptophyte alga that is distributed throughout marine habitats worldwide. This alga is an important plastid donor to the dinoflagellate Dinophysis caudata through the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum in the marine food web. To better understand the genomic characteristics of T. amphioxeia, we have sequenced and analyzed its plastid genome. The plastid genome sequence of T. amphioxeia is similar to that of Rhodomonas salina, and they share significan...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 4.41
Thomas Cavalier-Smith43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Oxford),
Ema E. Chao15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Oxford),
Rhodri Lewis10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford)
Abstract Heliozoan protists have radiating cell projections (axopodia) supported by microtubular axonemes nucleated by the centrosome and bearing granule-like extrusomes for catching prey. To clarify previously confused heliozoan phylogeny we sequenced partial transcriptomes of two tiny naked heliozoa, the endohelean Microheliella maris and centrohelid Oxnerella marina , and the cercozoan pseudoheliozoan Minimassisteria diva . Phylogenetic analysis of 187 genes confirms that all are chromists; b...
24 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2001in Water Environment Research 0.82
Paula C. Furey8
Estimated H-index: 8
(St. Catherine University),
Antonia Liess1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Eastern Michigan University)
A review of literature on substratrum-associated microbiotia from 2013 covers topics on benthic algae, bacteria and viruses from a range of aquatic environments, but focuses on freshwater ecosystem ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2011in Plant Biology 2.16
C. Koch1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ),
B. Brumme1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)
+ 3 AuthorsChristian Wilhelm34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Leipzig University)
Synchroma grande (Synchromophyceae, Heterokontophyta) is a marine amoeboid alga, which was isolated from a benthic habitat. This species has sessile cell stages (amoeboid cells with lorica and cysts) and non-sessile cell stages (migrating and floating amoebae) during its life cycle. The different cell types and their transitions within the life cycle are described, as are their putative functions. Cell proliferation was observed only in cells attached to the substrate but not in free-floating or...
2 Citations Source Cite
Andreas P. M. Weber57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Michigan State University),
Robin J. Horst1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Michigan State University)
+ 1 AuthorsChristine Oesterhelt8
Estimated H-index: 8
Treatises on extremophiles are frequently focused on organisms belonging to the Archaea and Eubacteria kingdoms. However, a significant number of eukaryotes, both unicellular and multicellular, have evolved to live and thrive in extreme environments. Although less is known about eukaryotic life in extreme environments in comparison to prokaryotic extremophiles, advances in genomics and in comprehensive, high‐throughput metabolic profiling techniques have provided new insight into the metabolic a...
24 Citations Source Cite
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