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Authoritarianism Goes Global: Countering Democratic Norms

Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Democracy3.67
· DOI :10.1353/jod.2015.0049
Alexander Cooley14
Estimated H-index: 14
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Abstract
Over the past decade, the international backlash against liberal democracy has grown and gathered momentum. Authoritarians have experimented with and refined a number of new tools, practices, and institutions that are meant to shield their regimes from external criticism and to erode the norms that inform and underlie the liberal international political order. These global political changes and systemic shifts have produced new counternorms that privilege state security, civilizational diversity, and traditional values over liberal democracy. The effects of these changes are most visible in the narrower political space that nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are facing, the shifting purposes that regional organizations are embracing, and the rising influence of non-Western powers as international patrons.
  • References (22)
  • Citations (47)
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References22
Newest
Published on Mar 4, 2015in Review of International Political Economy2.80
Kendra Dupuy3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UW: University of Washington),
James Ron18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Aseem Prakash38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UW: University of Washington)
How do public regulations shape the composition and behavior of non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Because many NGOs advocate liberal causes, such as human rights, democracy, and gender equality, they upset the political status quo. At the same time, a large number of NGOs operating in the Global South rely on international funding. This sometimes disconnects from local publics and leads to the proliferation of sham or 'briefcase' NGOs. Seeking to rein in the politically inconvenient NGO sec...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Democracy3.67
Larry Diamond42
Estimated H-index: 42
Larry Diamond is founding coeditor of the Journal of Democracy, se- nior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, and director of Stan- ford's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. The year 2014 marked the fortieth anniversary of Portugal's Revolu- tion of the Carnations, which inaugurated what Samuel P. Huntington dubbed the "third wave" of global democratization. Any assessment of the state of global de...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Democracy3.67
Steven Levitsky28
Estimated H-index: 28
,
Lucan A. Way20
Estimated H-index: 20
Published on Nov 23, 2014
Kendra Dupuy3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UW: University of Washington),
James Ron18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CIDE: Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas),
Aseem Prakash38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UW: University of Washington)
What motivates countries to enact laws that restrict foreign funding to domestically operating non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? We suggest governments often pass these laws to combat perceived foreign attempts to shape domestic politics. Political elites are not necessarily opposed to NGOs per se, but rather see foreign intrusion via funding to civil society as a threat to their political power. We test our argument using an original dataset of laws regulating foreign funding flows to dome...
Published on Feb 20, 2014
Thomas Carothers2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Saskia Brechenmacher2
Estimated H-index: 2
Published on Jan 1, 2013
Charles Wolf2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Xiao Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Eric Warner2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract : With the world's second largest economy, China has the capacity to engage in substantial programs of development-assistance and government investment in any and all of the emerging market countries. In the first decade of the 21st century, it has expanded and directed this capacity in 93 countries for both the benefit of the recipients and its own interests. Yet, until recently, little was known about the size and direction of such programs. Thomas Lum of the Congressional Research Se...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Journal of Democracy3.67
Darin Christensen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Jeremy M. Weinstein17
Estimated H-index: 17
Recent assaults on foreign-funded civil society groups in Egypt and Russia reflect a worrisome trend: Since 2002, twenty countries have updated their laws to restrict foreign funding to NGOs. Under what conditions do governments set these restrictions in place? Using original data from nearly 100 countries and case studies of regime behavior in East Africa and the former Soviet Union, we find that vulnerable governments restrict foreign support to civil society when they feel vulnerable to domes...
Published on Sep 1, 2012in Europe-Asia Studies1.35
David Lewis3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Bradford)
Abstract The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) represent competing sets of international norms in Central Asia. The contestation between these sets of norms has not led to a complete polarisation between members of the two organisations, however. Instead, the OSCE has used a range of discursive tactics to reduce political contestation, downplaying some contested issues and seeking shared discourses on security threats. This...
Published on Jul 23, 2012
Alexander Cooley14
Estimated H-index: 14
The struggle between Russia and Great Britain over Central Asia in the nineteenth century was the original "great game." But in the past quarter century, a new "great game" has emerged, pitting America against a newly aggressive Russia and a resource-hungry China, all struggling for influence over one of the volatile areas in the world: the long border region stretching from Iran through Pakistan to Kashmir. In Great Games, Local Rules, Alexander Cooley, one of America's most respected Central A...
Cited By47
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2019
Dani K. Nedal1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University),
Daniel H. Nexon13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Georgetown University)
This article aims to rekindle the debate on the politics of aid in the increasingly common – yet still under-studied – authoritarian and low-intensity conflict settings, detailing the case of Ethiopia in 2016, when a 50-year drought coincided with a wave of protests and a state of emergency. During four months of qualitative fieldwork in 2017, state, civil society, Ethiopian and international actors were approached – from humanitarian headquarters to communities in the Amhara, Oromiya and Somali...
Published on Mar 4, 2019in Third World Quarterly2.16
Marianne Kneuer5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Hildesheim),
Thomas Demmelhuber4
Estimated H-index: 4
(FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
+ 1 AuthorsTobias Zumbrägel1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
AbstractThe evidence of regional authoritarian clustering across different world regions goes together with the finding that after the end of the bipolar world regional patterns of interaction became more important. Especially in the 2000s a process of revitalisation of regional organisations and even the creation of new regional organisations took place. Interestingly, these newly founded organisations consist predominantly of authoritarian regimes. Due to the emergence and resilience of author...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Modern African Studies0.92
I. Desportes1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Dorothea Hilhorst17
Estimated H-index: 17
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H. Mandefro1
Estimated H-index: 1
markdownabstractThis article aims to rekindle the debate on the politics of aid in the increasingly common – yet still under-studied – authoritarian and low-intensity conflict settings, detailing the case of Ethiopia in 2016, when a 50-year drought coincided with a wave of protests and a state of emergency. During four months of qualitative fieldwork in 2017, state, civil society, Ethiopian and international actors were approached – from humanitarian headquarters to communities in the Amhara, Or...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Political Research Quarterly1.58
Susanna P. Campbell4
Estimated H-index: 4
(AU: American University),
Matthew DiGiuseppe5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Mississippi),
Amanda Murdie2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UGA: University of Georgia)
Do development international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) facilitate or destroy the bureaucratic capacity of the states in which they operate? The literature is split on this question. Some scholars argue that development INGOs weaken state capacity by delivering social services that the government is supposed to provide. Others argue that by increasing a country’s domestic demand for improved human rights, development INGOs improve a government’s capacity to fulfill them. In this paper...
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Andrea Cassani4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Milan),
Luca Tomini3
Estimated H-index: 3
(ULB: Université libre de Bruxelles)
What is autocratization and how many forms can it take? In this chapter, the authors elaborate a conceptual framework for the analysis of post-Cold War processes of autocratization. They define autocratization as a process of regime change towards autocracy that makes the exercise of political power more arbitrary and repressive and that restricts the space for public contestation and political participation in the process of government selection. The authors identify six possible forms of autoc...
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